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Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 5:23 AM
Docere Docere is offline
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Your city's "favoured quarter"

Does your city have "favored quarter" - i.e. a wedge running from the core towards affluent suburbs. Thinking for example of Chicago's North Side lakefront to North Shore for example.

In Toronto, there's a "favored quarter" area that runs north from downtown. The area looks something like this:

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  #2  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 5:41 AM
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Seattle would be anywhere near water, and/or on a hill overlooking water. That's in all directions on both sides of the city limits.

The eastern suburbs are generally the favored third otherwise.
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  #3  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 6:08 AM
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In Edmonton, it's generally south, but more specifically, southwest, hugging the river valley as it heads southwest towards Devon. West end would be closely following thereafter.
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Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 7:30 AM
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In the Twin Cities it runs from downtown Minneapolis through the southwest. It probably began because the best lakes in Minneapolis are to the southwest of downtown. These became the focus of most of the cities early upscale neighborhoods (Uptown, Kenwood, Linden Hills), then when suburbanization began, the first high end suburbs (Edina, St Louis Park) were a continuation of that. The west suburbs are favored too, mostly because Lake Minnetonka is a big lake with tons of bays and inlets which gave it a huge amount of shoreline for upscale development. The least favored is to the north and northwest.
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  #5  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 12:35 PM
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Boston is arranged more like the "donut" model with a wealthy center and then lower income neighborhoods in the rest of the urban area with wealthier areas resuming outside their but most of the wealthiest areas are concentrated towards the west and northwest of the city.

Here is a map of per capita income.

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  #6  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 12:50 PM
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Like most cities in Europe, London's runs west (upwind), starting from Mayfair.
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  #7  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 1:54 PM
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west oslo, definitely. the east was historically factories and workforce housing, and its more modern areas are where most of the city's (and by extension, country's) immigrant population live. parts of the groruddalen, as it is known in norwegian, are 95-100% immigrant. west oslo, by contrast, is much more posh, aristocratic, grand, etc. - at least to the extent modest norwegian culture will allow.

la's western areas, especially those on the beach and in nearby hills, are indeed the preferred areas. this extends all the way down from malibu to the palos verdes area, before picking up again in coastal orange county. the non-coastal, but hilly areas, of west la, such as beverly hills, brentwood, bel-air, calabasa, beverly park, etc., - are also very sought after, historically influential, and expensive areas.

more recently, however, the cultural, dining, arts, creative, etc., scenes have been moving east. it has more or less been expanding west-to-eat from hollywood, to silverlake, to echo park, to downtown la and boyle heights, and up to highland park. even koreatown, in the geographic center of the city, is getting in on the action. i'd say this is where most young people and those into the arts, urbanity, etc., are (or want to be) these days.
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Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 2:19 PM
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archcityhomes.com

this is a 10 year old map, and property values are much higher now in the city (in the middle and south), and much much much higher in the inner pre-war suburbs in the middle. nonetheless it very plainly shows the favored quarter around and west of forest park, right down the center. west is obviously upwind of city factory corridors as well as the huge concentrations of Illinois-side industry.

the center-to-west corridor is also the highest elevation area in the close-in areas, kind of a saddle between the rivers, historically far less pollution, cooler temperatures in summer, less flooding, etc.
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Last edited by Centropolis; Aug 21, 2016 at 2:56 PM.
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  #9  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 4:21 PM
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Cleveland is a bit strange in this regard. Within the city limits, downtown and the west side neighborhoods are favored (and receiving the bulk of reinvestment). But as soon as you leave the city limits, its the east side the is favored, starting with Cleveland Hts and moving in a wedge eastward and also including the University Circle area within the city.

Here's a quick sketch of the dividing line within the city and the suburbs...
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  #10  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 4:27 PM
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Here's the simplified version for DC. Basically, go northwest.



And here's Denver/Boulder. Both face southeast.

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  #11  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 4:34 PM
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Oh hey, a friend of mine, Payton Chung, made a whole series of income maps looking at favored quarters in some cities (I don't know why some and not others). Here are small versions. Click the link to see them bigger.



























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  #12  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 4:34 PM
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NYC has none really.

In the suburbs the North/Northeast suburbs (Westcehster and Fairfield counties) are ever so slightly more expensive/desirable apples to apples than in other directions, so I guess you could argue there's a suburban favored quarter, kinda. But Long Island and NJ have tons of wealth too, so its barely evident. You're only getting a slight discount buying in, say Westfield, NJ instead of Darien, CT.

Detroit has a favored quarter, heading due north alongside Woodward, analogous to Toronto along Yonge, but in Detroit most (definitely not all) of the city proper portion is somewhat depressed. But even in the crappy portions the homes are generally huge and were once grand.

Once you get outside city limits almost all the metro-area wealth is within a few miles of Woodward, so I do feel it's a bit bizzaroworld Toronto, as the wealth in Toronto clings to either side of Yonge once you hit the older suburban neighborhoods north of Yorkville.
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  #13  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 4:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Like most cities in Europe, London's runs west (upwind), starting from Mayfair.
I never thought of this, but you're right. It's definitely true in Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne, Munich, Budapest.

Frankfurt and Rome are north, though. I think Madrid too. There are probably some other exceptions.
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  #14  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 5:15 PM
Docere Docere is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
NYC has none really.

In the suburbs the North/Northeast suburbs (Westcehster and Fairfield counties) are ever so slightly more expensive/desirable apples to apples than in other directions, so I guess you could argue there's a suburban favored quarter, kinda. But Long Island and NJ have tons of wealth too, so its barely evident. You're only getting a slight discount buying in, say Westfield, NJ instead of Darien, CT.
NYC is really an example of a ring pattern where you have a wealthy core in Manhattan, then outer boroughs and industrial cities, then wealthy suburbs. Certainly no wedge of wealth running out of Manhattan.

Quote:
Detroit has a favored quarter, heading due north alongside Woodward, analogous to Toronto along Yonge, but in Detroit most (definitely not all) of the city proper portion is somewhat depressed. But even in the crappy portions the homes are generally huge and were once grand.

Once you get outside city limits almost all the metro-area wealth is within a few miles of Woodward, so I do feel it's a bit bizzaroworld Toronto, as the wealth in Toronto clings to either side of Yonge once you hit the older suburban neighborhoods north of Yorkville.
Interesting that Detroit has somewhat of a "Yonge St." pattern, where wealth runs through a "central corridor." Though I guess an incomplete one as you don't have a more or less contiguous zone running out of the downtown.
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Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 5:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
NYC is really an example of a ring pattern where you have a wealthy core in Manhattan, then outer boroughs and industrial cities, then wealthy suburbs. Certainly no wedge of wealth running out of Manhattan.
Yeah, there's poverty and wealth in all directions, and often intertwined in a manner fairly unusual in the U.S. There are housing projects in the Upper East Side and in Greenwich, CT, blocks from billionaires. Maybe slight regional preference for North/Northeast directional, but nothing consistent.

Long Island itself has a favored quarter, though (North Shore) and NJ has some favored quarters usually along rail lines (west of Newark, a corridor in Bergen close to Manhattan, etc.).

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Originally Posted by Docere View Post
Interesting that Detroit has somewhat of a "Yonge St." pattern, where wealth runs through a "central corridor." Though I guess an incomplete one as you don't have a more or less contiguous zone running out of the downtown.
Yeah, I've always thought that Yonge and Woodward play roughly analagous roles as major Great Lakes cities with massively divergent fortunes and with different national contexts. You can even see it within Detroit proper, in the struggling neighborhoods, where those closest to Woodward are grand, neglected homes.

I've also noticed that these "favored quarters" are often the residence for the "old guard". Toronto is amazingly diverse though the Yonge corridor north of downtown feels very white, Protestant, old-school Toronto wealth. I remember dining at an Indian restaurant on Avenue Rd. and the whole restaurant felt old, rich WASP, nothing like the typical Toronto. Corridors in DC, Houston and the like tend to be similar, very white and not reflecting regional diversity.
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Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 6:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Yeah, I've always thought that Yonge and Woodward play roughly analagous roles as major Great Lakes cities with massively divergent fortunes and with different national contexts. You can even see it within Detroit proper, in the struggling neighborhoods, where those closest to Woodward are grand, neglected homes.
Trying to imagine Yonge St. being rundown through much of the old city of Toronto (a run-down Rosedale?), Yonge and Eglinton as New Center, and I guess the consistently affluent zone doesn't really start until Lawrence or York Mills!

Quote:
I've also noticed that these "favored quarters" are often the residence for the "old guard". Toronto is amazingly diverse though the Yonge corridor north of downtown feels very white, Protestant, old-school Toronto wealth. I remember dining at an Indian restaurant on Avenue Rd. and the whole restaurant felt old, rich WASP, nothing like the typical Toronto. Corridors in DC, Houston and the like tend to be similar, very white and not reflecting regional diversity.
Basically - the Yonge corridor south of the 401 - running from Bathurst to Bayview/Leslie is WASP and Jewish (York Mills - the newest, most suburban part is the exception - has a lot of wealthy Asians). Bathurst is of course the main street for Jewish Toronto and it runs next to and in some cases bumps up with the traditional old money corridor - i.e. Forest Hill.
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  #17  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2016, 7:23 PM
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If you ask me, the lack of a favored quarter is one of the keys to NYC's success as a city. The wealth and poverty are spread out on the map like salt and pepper, thus no particular side of town is overburdened with poverty and disinvestment. I think this creates stability and holds up property values
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  #18  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2016, 12:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Citylover94 View Post
Boston is arranged more like the "donut" model with a wealthy center and then lower income neighborhoods in the rest of the urban area with wealthier areas resuming outside their but most of the wealthiest areas are concentrated towards the west and northwest of the city.

Here is a map of per capita income.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Here's the simplified version for DC. Basically, go northwest.



And here's Denver/Boulder. Both face southeast.

These two surprised me. In a lot of cities, "favoured quarters" tend to have geographic advantages; ie being near or in the region's more interesting geographic features. In Minneapolis, its the lakes, in LA its the coast and the hills, in Vancouver its the mountains and coast.

Following that logic, Boston's favoured quarters would more likely hug the coastline and Denver's hug the Front Ranges, but they don't. Instead, the favoured quarters abutt prairie and forest.

Why is this?
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  #19  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2016, 3:56 AM
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Austin would be south/southwest to mid northwest, including in-town neighborhoods and Hill Country McMansion Land.

Fort Worth would be south/southwest, most of the westside, and a bit of northwest. There are other affluent areas in the far northeast towards DFW airport in areas annexed in recent years.

Dallas is pretty much due north from near downtown highrises on out through opulent areas like Highland Park, University Park, Preston Hollow and so on with a slight jog north/northeast until things get to be a bit more standard issue high-end suburban for miles and miles and miles. Plano used to be the end of the rainbow, but now it extends to McKinney, Frisco, and beyond almost 30 miles from downtown.

Last edited by austlar1; Aug 22, 2016 at 4:11 AM.
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Old Posted Aug 22, 2016, 12:18 PM
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dallas is absolutely unbelievable. colossal 1960s subdivisions that take as long to drive out of as a normal entire commute.
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