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  #2101  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2014, 1:22 AM
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Construction is supposed to start in June

http://www.vulture.com/2014/01/moma-...rt-museum.html

Davidson: MoMA Reveals Its Expansion Plans — and the Fate of the American Folk Art Museum

By Justin Davidson

Quote:
The Museum of Modern Art is on the march again, advancing westward down 53rd Street, sweeping away the old American Folk Art Museum and planting its flag in the base of a future skyscraper. Previous iterations trail behind it like a supply chain: Goodwin and Stone’s 1939 original (which now looks like a dollhouse version of an art museum), Philip Johnson’s 1951 annex, Cesar Pelli’s 1984 interpolation, Yoshio Taniguchi’s austere monolith from 2004 — they’re all being preserved and updated. Only the American Folk Art Museum building, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien’s twelve-year-old gem, has to go, because, like a cobbler’s shack next to an airport, it’s in the way.

The architects who are designing this destructive expansion — Diller Scofidio + Renfro — understand perfectly what they’re doing, and it causes them genuine grief. They tried all sorts of contortions to fit the quirky little thing into the juggernaut that is MoMA, and I accept their claim that if they couldn’t do it, nobody could. The connective tissue between one structure and the next would have created disfiguring scars, the mechanical apparatus on top would have occluded the lovely skylights, and the idiosyncratic staircase would have to have been amputated in any case. By the time the architects were done tinkering with their old friends’ creation, it would have been so bastardized that there was little point in keeping the remains. In an architectural version of the battlefield paradox, DS+R would have had to destroy the building in order to save it.

But that hesitancy shows in the provisional design for the next phase. The client is bent on art-world domination; the architects seem halfhearted. Instead of healing the scar left by the Folk Art Museum, they have left a gleaming gap. A triple-height “art bay,” ample enough to accommodate house-size sculptures and outfitted with a glass wall that can be raised like a portcullis, opens directly onto the street. (No tickets needed.) Above that is a white-walled exhibition cube that, with a little deft stagecraft, converts to a black-box theater. These are neat tricks that will foster MoMA’s deepening commitment to performance art, and activate 53rd Street, but they still replace an important work of recent architecture with a pair of stacked glass boxes. It’s a disappointing tradeoff, a Pyrrhic triumph of expansionist logic over irrational affection.

MoMA says it needs to grow now because the last time it expanded, in 2004, attendance nearly doubled, to 3 million visitors a year. The experience of communing with Matisse can now feel like a Black Friday sale at Best Buy. As the director Glenn Lowry acknowledges, building more galleries won’t solve the congestion problem once and for all. So long as tourists keep pouring into New York, as modern art retains its prestige, and as the collection keeps growing, a modest infusion of square footage won’t keep pace with the demand.
Originally, the expansion was to be a generation-spanning affair. Then events took on a momentum of their own. In 2007, MoMA sold the adjacent empty lot to the developer Hines, in exchange for three floors of gallery space in a new residential tower, the 1,050-foot 53 West 53rd Street designed by Jean Nouvel. (Construction on that building is supposed to start in June.) Only after the deal was made did the board recognize that it had tumbled into a major architectural problem: Thanks to the peculiarities of the site, linking the existing galleries to the new ones would mean that crowds would funnel along a single corridor on each floor, then double back, creating nightmarish bottlenecks.
The ah-ha solution arrived when the Folk Art Museum next door spiraled toward bankruptcy. MoMA paid off its $32 million debt and took over the building. Demolish it, and visitors could be channeled along a smoothly flowing loop. That sort of traffic engineering is crucial for a museum to function smoothly, but if you’re going to reconfigure a global art institution on one of Manhattan’s most celebrated blocks, it’s not exactly a sublime source of inspiration. (Besides, having extra space does nothing to untangle the mess of escalators and catwalks in the existing structure.)

The new design does contain several persuasive virtues. It creates new access points, including a free 54th Street entrance to the sculpture garden, now sealed behind a high penitentiary wall. It peels off a strip of the black-glass façade along 53rd Street to soften that NSA-headquarters look. It alleviates the Penn Station–at-rush-hour feeling of the through-block lobby by opening new passageways and sprucing up the box office and coat check. Most of all, it adds more than 30,000 square feet of new exhibition space on three floors. Which is, roughly, the equivalent of one ample Chelsea gallery. A lot of art is going to stay in storage.
The architects accomplish all this not through wholesale reconstruction but by the kind of surgical interventions that Diller Scofidio + and Renfro carried out at Lincoln Center. That renovation turned out to be simultaneously subtle and transformative. It’s possible that as the architects refine their work, MoMA will receive a similarly rejuvenating spa treatment. Maybe seeing the Picassos will get more pleasant, and the whole complex will shed its cold, corporate air. But for now the design feels less like an optimistic hosanna than a mournful chorus of compromises.

Last edited by NYguy; Jan 9, 2014 at 1:00 PM.
     
     
  #2102  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2014, 1:11 PM
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2014 is shaping up to be a big year. Scheduled to begin (or resume) rising:

- Tower Verre
- 3 WTC
- Nordstrom Tower (217 W 57th)
- 111 W. 57th
- 30 Hudson Yards (north tower)

And those are just among the tallest.



http://www.dezeen.com/2014/01/09/raz...ion-says-moma/

Razing Williams and Tsien's folk art museum building is "only option" says MoMa director





9 January 2014


Quote:
MoMA director Glenn D. Lowry has revealed that plans for the expansion of the New York museum will include demolition of the Williams and Tsien-designed former American Folk Art Museum next door, despite an outcry from architects, conservationists and critics.

In a statement last night, Lowry said the Museum of Modern Art will move forward with designs by Diller Scofidio + Renfro to extend its existing building over the site of the 13-year-old former folk art museum designed by American architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien, following a six-month study that investigated options for its retention.

"The plans approved today are the result of a recommendation from the architects after a diligent and thoughtful six-month study and design process that explored all options for the site," said Lowry.

"The analysis that we undertook was lengthy and rigorous, and ultimately led us to the determination that creating a new building on the site of the former American Folk Art Museum is the only way to achieve a fully integrated campus."

Diller Scofidio + Renfro's expansion will add approximately 3700 square metres (40,000 square feet) of new galleries and public spaces to the museum.

It will extend across two sites west of the museum's midtown Manhattan building, including both the folk art museum site at 45 West 53rd Street and three floors of a new residential tower underway next door, allowing the existing lobby and ground-floor areas to be transformed into a large public space.


http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/09/ar...r.html?hp&_r=0

By ROBIN POGREBIN
JAN. 8, 2014






Quote:
The architects plan to use the former folk art museum site for what they envision as the MoMA of the future, creating a ground-floor area they call the Art Bay. That space would be fronted with a sheet of glass that could be raised to open the gallery to the street.

The Art Bay would be a flexible space for exhibitions and performances, similar to the courtyard at MoMA PS1, an affiliate of MoMA in Long Island City, Queens. This is in keeping with the intentions of MoMA’s founding director, Alfred H. Barr Jr., to establish an art space “directly connected to the street,” Mr. Lowry said.

Redeveloping the folk art museum’s site would link MoMA’s existing galleries to a planned 82-story residential tower just west of the folk-art site, designed by the French architect Jean Nouvel. The tower, being developed by the Houston-based Hines — would include exhibition space for the museum.

Although MoMA’s 2004 renovation added space, the museum said it still needed more room. It had projected annual attendance of about 2.2 million in the Taniguchi building. Instead it has reached 3 million in a space of 125,000 square feet. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, by comparison, has 6 million visitors and 2 million square feet.) “Anyone who’s been in the building knows how crowded the galleries are,” Mr. Lowry said.

The expansion would add 15,500 square feet of gallery space in the folk art site at 45 West 53rd Street, and 39,000 square feet in the Nouvel tower.


Of course, seeing the best piece of work at MOMA won't be so hard...


Quote:
Originally Posted by hunser View Post
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Last edited by NYguy; Jan 9, 2014 at 1:26 PM.
     
     
  #2103  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2014, 3:41 PM
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I'm happy that this superb tower will cause the museum to fix that Taniguchi mess (that cost over $800 million bucks).
     
     
  #2104  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2014, 10:01 PM
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http://therealdeal.com/blog/2014/01/...ecture-review/

Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s MoMA redesign daringly opens up façade: Architecture review





January 10, 2014
By James Gardner


Quote:
.....the museum announced certain key additions, subtractions and modifications to the Kremlin-like fortress that continues to grow on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues.

True, MoMA has far too much traffic even for its expanded form: it receives half as many visitors as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, yet has only one eighth the space. Also, its severe and darksome lobby, which extends from 53rd to 54th streets, feels distinctly unwelcoming, even menacing.

In the interests of expanding the museum and making it more inviting to the city at large, MoMA has called in the capable firm of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, which has wrought such notable improvements upon the campus of Lincoln Center.

Diller Scofidio + Renfro will have an easier time of it here, since the existing buildings are more compatible with their style than the travertine palaces ten blocks north. According to the renderings, and aside from a few bold diagonals in the entrance, the architects will respect the strict rectilinear form of MoMA’s overall design, while playing their usual games with radical recession into depth in the new lobby, as well as with steep and intentionally uncomfortable stairways. The result will be a more coherent and open, lighter and more unified façade along the main entrance of 53rd Street.

Perhaps the architects’ boldest innovation will be the daring decision to open up the museum’s famed sculpture garden, to allow the public free and direct access from the street. Nothing in Tanaguchi’s design communicates more eloquently the divide between museum-goers (who can afford the $25 admission) and the rest of the city than that high-walled barrier, which is slatted just enough for pedestrians outside to catch a glimpse of the happy few. Now that barrier will be breached along 54th Street with a sheer glass canopy that recalls the architects’ work and Lincoln Center, even as it pays homage to Yanaguchi’s strict geometric idiom.

But, as MoMA has now confirmed, the expansion will result in the destruction of Tod Williams and Billy Tsien’s abandoned American Folk Art Museum, whose threatened demise caused such hand-wringing last spring. After considerable public outcry, not least from the architects themselves, Lowry announced back then that the building’s fate would be reconsidered. Now, after a decent interval and in consultation with the new architects, he has returned to his original intention to tear it down. As I stated at the time and as I continue to believe, this is the only right decision. The building was not functional and the design, from a purely aesthetic consideration, was substandard.
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  #2105  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2014, 12:38 AM
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Razing the small art space should be fast.
     
     
  #2106  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2014, 1:08 AM
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http://therealdeal.com/blog/2014/01/...ion-architect/

MoMA demolition of folk art museum “only option”: architect





January 29, 2014
Mark Maurer


Quote:
Architect Elizabeth Diller defended the Museum of Modern Art’s decision to tear down the former American Folk Art Museum to allow for expansion, arguing at a presentation last night that it was “the only option.”

The MoMA floor heights conflict with the layout of the American Folk Art Museum, and ramps connecting the two museum would not work, said Diller of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the architecture firm handling the project.

Despite a push by the architects to incorporate the building into their plans, MoMA confirmed earlier this month that it would proceed with demolition plans, as previously reported. The demolition is expected to occur by June.

“The hope is that you would take your responsibility to the building as seriously as you take your responsibility to your discipline,” architectural adviser Karen Stein said in response to Diller at the event, as Curbed reported.

The MoMA rebuild will connect to Hines’ planned 1,050-foot-tall Torre Verre. In October, the Jean Nouvel-designed project secured about $1 billion in financing, allowing the plan to move ahead after being stuck in limbo for a number of years .
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  #2107  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2014, 7:13 PM
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http://hines.com/property/detail.aspx?id=2082

Quote:
3W53rd
New York, NY

Hines, along with partners Goldman Sachs Real Estate Principal Investment Area and Pontiac Land Group of Singapore, are developing 53W53rd Street, an iconic residential condominium project that will be adjacent to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

Designed by Jean Nouvel, the sweeping 72-story, 750,000-square-foot tower will house 145 high-end condominium residences, designed by world-renowned architect Thierry Despont. In addition, the building's lower floors will include 36,000 square feet of new exhibition space for MoMA distributed over three floors.

The building’s unique silhouette tapers as it rises to a 1,050-foot-tall distinctive spire. Its metal and glass façade expresses the building's structural system with its many diagonal elements. The tower will include an extensive package of amenities including breathtaking New York City and Central Park views, spectacular common areas, a high-performance fitness facility including a 75-foot lap pool, and full-time concierge service.

All discretionary approvals necessary to build the project are in place and construction is expected to begin in mid 2014 with initial occupancy in late 2018. Lend Lease has been designated as the general contractor and Corcoran Sunshine Marketing Group will handle the project's marketing and sales, which are expected to begin in 2014.
     
     
  #2108  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2014, 7:20 PM
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Wow...great news!
     
     
  #2109  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2014, 8:36 PM
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Wait, first it says designed by Jean Nouvel, then it says designed by Thierry Despont?

But it's great to hear that construction on this will start this year, definitely don't want to miss this thing going up.
     
     
  #2110  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2014, 8:52 PM
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Despont will design the interior (the condos)
     
     
  #2111  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2014, 3:28 PM
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Hopefully more information about the project is revealed here...





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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
     
     
  #2112  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2014, 11:31 PM
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My friend and fellow forum member Danielson27 made these models and I just took the screenshots of them, sorry for them not being clad!!! One57, 432 Park, Torre Verre, 111 W57, 225 W57, 220 CPS are all there.

From Central Park:


From the West:


From the Empire State Building:


From Rockefeller Center:


From Rockefeller Center:
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  #2113  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 1:16 AM
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Great news - I'm anxious for work to commence, as I know we all are.
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  #2114  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 2:35 AM
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Those models just show me we need that 200 ft back. But I'm still excited for this one to be built as is.
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  #2115  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 12:03 PM
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http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/79275

Bronze on Your Hands: Diller Scofidio + Renfro Faces Folk Museum Backlash





February 7, 2014
The Editors


Quote:
Liz Diller faced down a hostile crowd at the recent “MoMA Expansion Conversation,” hosted by the Architectural League, the Municipal Art Society, and AIA New York. Apparently she’s had some practice.

One elder statesman of the New York architecture community reports that Diller made a series of phone calls to prominent architects prior to the public release of MoMA’s plans asking for their advice and support. This gray eminence apparently told her the firm should resign from the commission. At which point Ric Scofidio apparently chimed in, saying, succinctly, “Never!”

An editor from another publication reports rumors of dissent within Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Apparently some associates in the firm have asked not to work on the project, fearing a Scarlet Letter on their resumes.
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  #2116  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 7:37 PM
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Architects should be proud of being part of the project to replace that ill-conceived Folk Art Museum. The front blocks natural light from entering the building. It looks like something that belongs in a corporate atrium with a waterfall running down its face. And the inside is just as bad: extraneous staircases and too little wall space. The building was so poorly designed that the Museum went bankrupt.

Good riddance.

No one is in love with the interior of this building. If some people are incensed about the removal of the tombasil (white bronze) facade, they can raise funds to have it re-located. They might even be able to shame MoMA/Hines to kick in a million bucks towards having that done, in order to decrease the criticism.

This building cost $32 million to construct. It was so inefficient that the debt went into default in less than a decade. MoMA paid $31.2 million for it. Do people expect MoMA to just eat that expense and leave this inefficient building where it is, an enduring monkey wrench in the works of MoMA's plans?

Overall, this Folk Museum was just an absurd use of premium real estate. This building wasn't a good idea anywhere, but it was an awful idea in its present location.

Last edited by McSky; Feb 11, 2014 at 8:01 PM.
     
     
  #2117  
Old Posted Feb 11, 2014, 9:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McSky View Post
Architects should be proud of being part of the project to replace that ill-conceived Folk Art Museum. The front blocks natural light from entering the building. It looks like something that belongs in a corporate atrium with a waterfall running down its face.
Like the Trump Tower on 5th.

When all is said and done, and this beauty is built, all with have envy they weren't part of this great, iconic development. MOMA is already iconic, the tower will become an icon, and the merger of the two is where this comes into play.
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  #2118  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2014, 2:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McSky View Post
Architects should be proud of being part of the project to replace that ill-conceived Folk Art Museum. The front blocks natural light from entering the building. It looks like something that belongs in a corporate atrium with a waterfall running down its face. And the inside is just as bad: extraneous staircases and too little wall space. The building was so poorly designed that the Museum went bankrupt.

Good riddance.

No one is in love with the interior of this building. If some people are incensed about the removal of the tombasil (white bronze) facade, they can raise funds to have it re-located. They might even be able to shame MoMA/Hines to kick in a million bucks towards having that done, in order to decrease the criticism.

This building cost $32 million to construct. It was so inefficient that the debt went into default in less than a decade. MoMA paid $31.2 million for it. Do people expect MoMA to just eat that expense and leave this inefficient building where it is, an enduring monkey wrench in the works of MoMA's plans?

Overall, this Folk Museum was just an absurd use of premium real estate. This building wasn't a good idea anywhere, but it was an awful idea in its present location.
     
     
  #2119  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2014, 3:02 AM
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Originally Posted by gttx View Post
But think of the children!!!
     
     
  #2120  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2014, 5:23 PM
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http://www.archdaily.com/474847/opin...content=474847

OPINION: DS+R Should Have Resigned from the MoMA Commission


Quote:
With all the controversy surrounding Diller Scofidio +Renfro (DSR) and MoMA’s decision to demolish the American Folk Art Museum to make way for expansion, DS+R has increasingly come under fire (indeed, even DS+R’s democratizing move to make the MoMA’s sculpture garden accessible to the public has provoked considerable ire). In the following article, which originally appeared on Metropolis as “Damage Control,” critic and author Martin Pedersen questions: why didn’t DS+R just walk away?....

Given the outrage surrounding the decision and MoMA’s damaged credibility as a cultural institution, it’s hard to see how this won’t inflict real harm on the architects’ reputations. The whole sorry episode has been extremely damaging to the DSR brand, which was once arty, innovative and culturally hip. It’s what now, exactly?


http://www.artsjournal.com/culturegr...expansion.html

Gladiator in the Architects’ Den: Elizabeth Diller’s Bravura Performance on MoMA’s Expansion

January 29, 2014
by CultureGrrl


Quote:
She probably didn’t change the hearts and minds of the many in the architectural community who adamantly oppose the Museum of Modern Art’s (to my mind justifiable) decision to knock down the 12-year-old American Folk Art Museum in connection with its next expansion.

But Elizabeth Diller walked away from last night’s presentation and panel discussion on the expansion (sponsored by two of her critics—the Architectural League and the Municipal Art Society of New York, as well as the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter) with a long round of strong applause ringing in her ears.

Her intelligent, poised presentation (with numerous slides of conceptual renderings and floorplans) detailed the results of her firm’s failed attempts to find a design solution that would “serve the museum’s mission and curatorial goals” while preserving the Tod Williams Billie Tsien-designed American Folk Art Museum. (Those architects were notable by their absence.) “We were unable to find an adaptive reuse solution,” Diller said.

During the question-and-answer period, Glenn Lowry, director of the Museum of Modern Art, stated flatly that, notwithstanding pleas by some that the knockdown be delayed and reconsidered, “we’ve worked through a lot of options and we’ve made our decision” [emphasis added].


( It was more suitable to the article )




http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/13/ny...e-on.html?_r=0

Folk Art Building Will Be Demolished, but Its Facade Will Live On

FEB. 12, 2014


Quote:
Contrary to what you may have read lately, the Museum of Modern Art is intent on carefully preserving the former American Folk Art Museum next door.

At least, the part of it that is most recognizable to the public: an 82-foot-high sculptural ensemble of 63 panels, cast in a gorgeous copper-bronze alloy, each panel different from those around it. Some look like lunar landscapes, others like lava flows. They are arrayed in three planes that fold into one another as a palm would crease when closing.

We will take the facade down, piece by piece, and we will store it,” Glenn D. Lowry, the director of the Museum of Modern Art, said in an interview last week. “We have made no decision about what happens subsequently, other than the fact that we’ll have it and it will be preserved.”

Alberto Cavallero, a principal in Diller Scofidio, said the facade was “very amenable to disassembly” since the panels, three-eighths of an inch thick, are hung on a supporting armature. They will be wrapped for storage, he said.

“It would be a kinder fate for the museum facade to be at Storm King, as the front of an imaginary building in an enclosure of fresh air, than to be buried in storage for the foreseeable future,” said Darcy Miro, the artist who collaborated on the facade with Mr. Williams and Ms. Tsien. The Storm King Art Center is in the Hudson Valley. The panels were cast at the Tallix fine-arts foundry in Beacon, N.Y.

“It would be a mistake to just use it as adornment,” Ms. Miro said. “Maybe, as metal, it was always meant to go back to the land and leave the city.”

Maybe they should just put the thing on display in the museum, and shut the critics up.
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.

Last edited by NYguy; Feb 12, 2014 at 6:17 PM.
     
     
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