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  #21  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 2:34 AM
PragmaticIdealist PragmaticIdealist is offline
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Just to the North of Loma Linda is the Riverfront District of San Bernardino, the main commercial, business, and financial area in the city. Three sbX stations are planned here.















































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  #22  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 2:39 AM
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Back at the city center, a professional baseball stadium is located a block South of the multimodal transit station, which combines sbX, Metrolink, and light-rail/D.E.M.U. with improved local bus service.



This stadium is within walking distance of most areas within the Vision & Action Plan boundaries.

Another more historic stadium is located about a mile South at the National Orange Show site where Lewis Development will open its project in 2014. The stadium, itself, which has hosted everything from football games to horse shows to Presidential speeches is the recipient of funds from President Obama's Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which will go towards enhancing the versatility of the venue, retrofitting it seismically, and restoring it to its original stateliness. And, again, the site is only about a hundred feet from the sbX station there.
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  #23  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 2:44 AM
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Nice. Now all we need is passenger service at SBD to complete the package.

The IE might one day be a decent place to live.
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  #24  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:08 AM
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Speaking of which, the stylish new San Bernardino International Airport is within weeks of completing its new international and executive terminals and customs facilities, which will join the refurbished existing terminal and the new 150,000-gallon fuel farm.





















The executive terminal features 14,000 square feet of hangar-integrated office space.
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  #25  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:18 AM
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http://www.pe.com/localnews/inland/s....461873f.html#

Quote:
Counters and kiosks are in place, ready to sell tickets and check in travelers at San Bernardino International Airport's newly refurbished passenger terminal.

High-definition TV monitors display place-holder arrivals and departures, escalators and decorative water sculptures are in motion, and a high-tech security room monitors for suspicious activity. A booming recorded voice tells visitors not to leave bags unattended.

One thing is missing from this picture: The airport has yet to land a commercial airline to bring revenue-generating passenger service to the terminal.

Fifteen years after the 1994 closing of Norton Air Force Base, local authorities are close -- yet in many ways still very far away -- from turning the abandoned military airfield into a productive enterprise that generates jobs and tax revenues.

Non-aviation development has generated hundreds of jobs and brought big-named companies to the project. Still, it produces nowhere near the 10,000 direct jobs of the airbase's heyday, not to mention the ripple impact those positions once generated.

More than $180 million has been spent on aviation-related base renovations -- $80 million of which has been spent or committed to the nearly completed passenger terminal, whose cost has more than doubled from original estimates. Final work on the passenger terminal, tarmac and parking lots will be completed by year's end.

Officials for the past year have said a seriously interested but undisclosed domestic passenger carrier could announce new service for the terminal at any time. But in a still brutal economy for the airline industry, even if a carrier arrives this year, airport authorities and aviation economists say the local facility could face unknown millions more in investment costs to make commercial air service viable.

Authorities say they've boosted the San Bernardino airport's prospects considerably with the recent hiring of New Jersey-based AvPorts to oversee local airport operations. The firm, once part of Pan American Airlines, has an 80-year track record that includes managing seven airports, mostly on the East Coast, as well as one of the larger passenger terminals at Newark International.

"This is a crucial launch point for the airport," said Pat Morris, San Bernardino's mayor and head of a joint-powers authority that oversees the air base refurbishing, referring to the new hire.

Starting Sept. 1, AvPorts' top priority is to use its expertise and industry contacts to bring in the mix of passenger carriers, private aircraft, cargo and support services that the local airport must have to become economically viable.

"Our experience is that people who want to come to an airport want to be able to deal with one entity," said AvPorts Chief Operating Officer John Harden, referring to companies the airport will be looking to attract. "We work well that way, as a one-stop resource."

TOUGH JOB AHEAD

For years, San Bernardino airport development has come in fits and starts. As the economy nosedived, authorities have increasingly found themselves offering financial assistance to keep crucial aircraft support businesses afloat.

Experts say it may take even more international lobbying and enhanced financial incentives to get airlines to operate locally, at a time when carriers have been cutting flights drastically at airports, including Ontario International.

"The economy we're operating in is much different now than it was just two years ago," said Scot Spencer, who has been overseeing improvements to the main terminal since 2007 and who leases and subleases space in the airport's service hangars. "For us lately it's been for every two steps forward, it's maybe one-and-a-half steps back."

In some ways, the Norton renovation has been a tale of two projects.

On the outskirts of the airfield, more than 3,000 jobs and millions in new tax revenues have been generated by offices and distribution centers operated by companies such as Stater Bros., Mattel, Kohl's and Pep Boys in projects master-planned by Texas-based Hillwood Development.

That revenue, combined with federal transportation and development grants, has fueled the bulk of work done so far on the airport.

"If it weren't for those industrial projects, I don't think we would have what we have now on the airport side," said Don Rogers, interim executive director of the Inland Valley Development Agency, which oversees projects tied to the Norton refurbishing.

POSSIBLE SCENARIOS

To improve passenger service and other on-site business prospects, the San Bernardino airport may need to do more financial pump-priming.

Michael Burrows, assistant director of the Inland development agency, said officials are in the "very preliminary" stages of figuring out how to financially assist businesses on the airport grounds and lure new ones. That might include setting up a loan or matching-funds program with the help of government grants.

Local officials may need to go well beyond previously discussed start-up incentives, such as reduced landing fees for carriers.

"To get someone to add flights, you would probably have to pay them a lot of money to do that - maybe $2 million a year," said Darryl Jenkins, a former airline business professor at George Mason University near Fairfax, Va., who is now an airline consultant. "You would probably have to find a way to guarantee them no losses for at least a couple of years."

Alan Bender, an airline business expert and professor with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla., said San Bernardino may have to offer airlines a way to share the risk of setting up new service. For instance, some smaller airports have set up ticket banks, through which businesses guarantee they will buy a fixed number of tickets per year to ensure the airline makes a set level of revenue.

San Bernardino may need to emphasize leisure rather than business travel, and it may become a good tourist alternative to the Palm Springs airport when the economy improves -- for instance, as an arrival point for mountain ski resort visitors. Major carriers likely won't be looking to add new business services in the current economy.

"There's a large number of people for whom San Bernardino will be the most convenient place to fly out," Bender said of leisure travelers.
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  #26  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:20 AM
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Commercial airline arrival is expected at SBIA

Quote:
At San Bernardino International Airport, confidence abounds that a deal to bring a commercial airline to the facility will be announced by the end of this year.

"We have it basically completed," said Donald L. Rogers, SBIA's interim executive director. "We have an expectation of commercial airline service at the end of the year."
http://www.sbsun.com/news/ci_13277806
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  #27  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:25 AM
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General overviews with further annotations are available here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pragmat...7606105868674/
... and here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pragmat...7606105868674/

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  #28  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:27 AM
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Expanding upon the American Sports University, which currently occupies several blocks in the city center is the "superuniversity" campus, an interdisciplinary space right in the heart of the urban environment and comprised of student and faculty housing, as well as student-life and educational facilities shared among Loma Linda University, San Bernardino State University, and the University of Redlands, as well as the city's creative and technical schools, in addition to the preeminent medical centers and research hospitals of the valley that are all connected by sbX.

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  #29  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:29 AM
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  #30  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:32 AM
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These are preliminary concept plans for the new Celebration Square and for new infill retail at Heritage Row, as well as the adjacent garden resort that expands on the existing Maruko hotel by creating the elaborate pool area on the roof of the existing parking structure and by sharing those amenities with the Pelli-designed City Hall adapted for hospitality reuse. Both towers would receive new facades consisting mainly of transparent glass replacing the mirrored windows and new balconies overlooking the activity in Celebration Square and the pool area.





While the porte cochere for the Maruko property faces the 215 freeway, the valet area for the Pelli building is oriented to the San Bernardino International Airport. In fact, vistas along the 3rd Street arterial greenway will dramatically terminate with the former City Hall.
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  #31  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:33 AM
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Heritage buildings to be integrated into the dynamic and contemporary fabric of this area include:











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  #32  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:34 AM
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The stodginess and datedness of the existing street furniture and light standards will be replaced in order to create a series of vibrant and appealing outdoor rooms for bocce ball, chess, al fresco dining, etc. available to both resort guests and the general public, including nearby loft residents and office workers, as well as shoppers and diners drawn to the appropriately-anchored existing and new retail surrounding the remodeled square and extending to the historic courthouse, adapted for reuse, and the plaza there, which will be activated with new civic uses such as street festivals and a differentiated open-air market.







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  #33  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:35 AM
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Initial phasing for the Vision & Action Plan concentrates on Theatre Square and areas to the East of E Street, but the cancer that has been eating from within the core of San Bernardino for so long has been the Victor Gruen-designed Central City Mall, the quintessential dead shopping center, which is to be demolished in phases while preserving certain key buildings.



Since the County of San Bernardino has outgrown its current site and since the City of San Bernardino needs to seismically-retrofit its City Hall, both governments have decided to combine their efforts in order to create an iconic Civic Square/Festival Square near the proposed Gateway Park. Typically-seen as stodgy, these government uses will, instead, be recast as active civic environments with supporting retail and public-realm amenities at street level and in the upper reaches of the towers.



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  #34  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:41 AM
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  #35  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:43 AM
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  #36  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:45 AM
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  #37  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:50 AM
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The county's move to a bigger facility where operations can be consolidated frees the Postmodernist Arrowhead Plaza, where eastward vistas along Fourth Street terminate, for a new occupant or an adaptive reuse.



Arrowhead Plaza can remain a simple office building, but, because of the nature of its design, the site holds all sorts of possibilities, including new utilization of the forecourt, the colonnades, and the surrounding gardens.







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  #38  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 3:53 AM
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On the left of this image is San Bernardino's city center and the light-rail/D.E.M.U. tracks of the Redlands Subdivision, as well as their relationship to the existing passenger terminals of San Bernardino International Airport at Third Street and Tippecanoe Avenue.



This image shows the proposed route for California High-Speed Rail in the Greater Los Angeles area.



On the left of this image is the high-speed rail route (denoted by the blue line) and its relationship to San Bernardino International Airport.


Last edited by PragmaticIdealist; Sep 10, 2009 at 7:45 AM.
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  #39  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 4:08 AM
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With the Pacific Electric Railway, you can see the way that the two urban cores of Los Angeles and San Bernardino were originally connected before freeways changed development patterns.

This configuration predicts future transit-oriented development patterns using local and regional rail and B.R.T., combined with the San Bernardino International Airport and the potential for an adjoining high-speed rail station, especially as oil prices rise, traffic congestion worsens, and populations densify.

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  #40  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 4:20 AM
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I just found planning documents related to the multimodal transit station and the rest of the local rail project between San Bernardino and Redlands. And, evidently, the mode SanBAG has chosen is Diesel Multiple Units (D.M.U. or D.E.M.U.), the same system in use for the Sprinter line in northern San Diego County.

D.M.U. is like light rail, except the trains do not require electrical catenary wires, which would help provide better energy efficiency but which would also degrade visual resources, especially in historic districts.

A landscaped multi-use trail is expected to run parallel with the rail service's right-of-way.

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