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  #81  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:03 AM
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Three new bridges are proposed as part of the Vehicular Circulation Plan.





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  #82  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:04 AM
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The Arrowhead Springs Resort is situated on the Rim of the World Scenic Byway, which connects, by way of San Bernardino, Lake Arrowhead, Big Bear Lake, and the rest of the San Bernardino Mountains with the heavily-populated regions in southern California.





Other existing and proposed uses for the property include:
  • A 16-acre botanical garden
  • A chautauqua
  • An equestrian center
  • Equestrian estates
  • A new golf course that is designed to function as flood control
  • Golf estates
  • A retirement community
  • Townhomes and condominiums
  • Dedicated spa suites
  • A wedding pavilion
  • An auditorium
  • An amphitheatre
  • A tennis club
  • A differentiated convention center, including facilities for corporate retreats
  • The private bungalows that originally belonged to people like Lucille Ball, Humphrey Bogart, Elizabeth Taylor, and Eleanor Roosevelt
  • A museum and library interpreting the site
  • A helipad available for adventure skiing
  • And, a 1,400-acre private nature reserve with multi-use bridle trails





The resort was originally accessed by way of the Pacific Electric Red Cars via this right-of-way, which has since been converted to a public trail.

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  #83  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:09 AM
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  #84  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:10 AM
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  #85  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:11 AM
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  #86  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:12 AM
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Diagram of Proposed Land Uses within Half a Mile of Stations along the Reactivated Pacific Electric Redlands Subdivision
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  #87  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:12 AM
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Site Plan of Proposed Transit-Oriented, Mixed-Use Redevelopment of Existing Commercial Activity Center at California Street



A large parking deck would be constructed over the existing Wal-Mart store, which has expressed an interest in moving to a different location.
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  #88  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:17 AM
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Loma Linda University Medical Center is San Bernardino County's second-largest private employer, and it is expanding in a big way during this recessionary economy.

Among L.L.U.M.C.'s affiliates are: Loma Linda University Children's Hospital; Loma Linda University Medical Center East Campus; Loma Linda University Proton Treatment Center; and, Loma Linda University clinical faculty corporations, such as Loma Linda University Health Care, Faculty Medical Group of L.L.U.S.M. and Loma Linda University Behavioral Medicine Center. The medical center and its affiliates have embarked on an expansion program with the construction of several new hospital and medical facilities in an effort to meet the region's growing health care needs.

Loma Linda medical center officials have begun developing plans for a new children's hospital to replace the current 250-bed facility. The hospital opened in 1993 and treats more than 125,000 children annually. The institution also was expected to receive $2.8 million in federal funding for its ground-breaking space-radiation research through use of the Proton Beam Accelerator. The expected funds were part of $18.5 million in local earmarks supported by Rep. Jerry Lewis of Redlands that were included in the $410 billion recovery and reinvestment act signed by President Barack Obama on March 10.

While all this new construction means more access to health care, there is also a need for hundreds of doctors, nurses, technicians and other support staff to operate these new facilities.

Whether there are enough nurses to meet the demand is an ongoing question as California's nursing schools are understaffed and face funding reductions, which have forced them to put potential students on waiting lists.

"We need to make sure there is funding for education," said Jill Furillo, the Southern California director of the California Nurses Association. "There is not a lack of people wanting to go into nursing. There will be a problem if funding for nurse education and training is cut back in the middle of a health-industry expansion."

While government, health care, education, and transportation are serving as the foundation for the revitalization of San Bernardino's city center, the synergy between education and health care is particularly interesting since a nursing student at San Bernardino State University, for instance, could serve an internship with Loma Linda University Medical Center and reside in student housing on San Bernardino's "superuniversity" campus. San Bernardino is well-positioned to meet the growing demand for both health care and education, as well as for education in the health-care field, specifically.

http://www.inlandsocal.com/business/...a.2aa26e0.html
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  #89  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:19 AM
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Construction is nearing completion on the Inland Regional Center and much of the rest of a new 30-acre master-planned business park in the Riverfront District in San Bernardino.



The site is located across the street from the San Bernardino Golf Club and within a mile of San Bernardino International Airport
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  #90  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:23 AM
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San Bernardino features, Northwest of San Bernardino State University, Glen Helen Pavilion, the largest amphitheatre in North America and the historic site of "The Us Festival," created by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak in 1982.

The Us Festival, an event compared with Woodstock, celebrated the nascent confluence of art and technology. And, a revival of the idea may soon be in the works to accompany San Bernardino's re-branding effort, which emphasizes a fresh, young, creative, and tech-savvy image in keeping with similar lifestyle brands, like Apple, Google, and Obama for America.

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  #91  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:25 AM
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  #92  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:30 AM
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Here is the proposed site of Heritage Row, pedestrianized for the annual Route 66 Rendez-vous, "The Great Celebration of America's Mother Road."



Heritage Row is the site of the Fox Theatre (1929).







Along with the California Theatre (1928),....





... the Sturges Center for the Fine Arts, including the Sturges Auditorium (1924),...







... and Bing Wong Hall,...





... the sheer concentration of large performance venues that currently exist in San Bernardino's city center offers the opportunity to develop a true theatre district with several choices every day and night for live theatre; lectures; ballet and other dance; opera; symphonies; etc.
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  #93  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:33 AM
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A handful of outdoor performance spaces also currently exist in the city center.



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  #94  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:37 AM
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While just outside the Vision & Action Plan boundaries, the activity surrounding the existing Metrolink and Amtrak station, built in 1918, is important as the area will serve as one of San Bernardino's most historic and unique places.















Appearing most recently in Universal Pictures' "The Changeling," the depot has recently undergone a $16 million renovation, and the building now houses, in addition to a refurbished passenger terminal, the San Bernardino History and Railroad Museum, which is just the first piece in a plan to assemble historic and architecturally-interesting structures that require removal in order to make way for the North lake system.



















Additionally, new transit-oriented development has already begun to take shape there in the form of the first phases of The Mercado at San Bernardino Station, which includes a Contextualist, Mission Revival design, as well as a pedestrian-orientation on 3rd Street and an automobile-orientation on 2nd.











While a smattering of neighborhood retail currently exists on the lower level, a new parking terrace is now under construction to allow for the occupancy of more destination retail.



The City of San Bernardino also owns the Santa Fe 3751, which is fully-operational and which the city wants to use more frequently for trips to the Grand Canyon and Las Vegas, as well as Palm Springs and even the Orange Empire Railway Museum in Perris.



Some discussion has also been given to the prospect of a "citrus train" departing San Bernardino and transporting visitors through the orange groves of Redlands' San Timoteo Canyon, which is destined for more agri-tourism uses, especially those that connect with the existing agri-tourism in Oak Glen. Dinner excursions and the like could be part of an effort to make the Old San Bernardino Station more of a center for tourism, and the city is currently seeking federal funding for a storage facility in order to avoid leaving the locomotive in Los Angeles where the machine is currently stowed.



































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  #95  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:39 AM
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Such excursions recall the region's original tourism industry that was centered around cities like Riverside and Redlands, as well as San Bernardino's own Arrowhead Springs, and that gave visitors an appreciation for the Inland Empire's spectacular orange groves, countryside, and parklands, much of which are still very much in existence despite their proximity to the metropolitan areas.

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  #96  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:41 AM
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Speaking of museums, San Bernardino has a museum of art and antiquities with a world-class permanent collection that, unfortunately, is tucked in a far corner of the city where there isn't much traffic.















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  #97  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:42 AM
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Possible new locations for the Robert V. Fullerton Museum of Art in the city center include three potential adaptive reuses. The largest is the Harris Company building, which features: an expansive glass-roofed atrium; a mezzanine with a cafe; three additional floors; a basement; a rooftop garden; and, street-oriented frontages, potentially available for retail, on three sides of the structure.



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  #98  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 9:43 AM
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The other two are both government-owned and are on the National Register of Historic Places. The larger is the Classical Revival courthouse, which will be vacated with the construction of the new state and county courts complex in the proposed Democracy Park, and the smaller is the graciously-designed post office.






Last edited by PragmaticIdealist; Nov 16, 2009 at 11:23 AM.
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  #99  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 8:30 PM
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The artists selected for The Esplanade, including the sbX stations, were announced last week.


San Bernardino:

Cliff Garten
http://www.flickr.com/photos/0ccam/3661151243/

Amy Bauer

Brian Boldon

Brian Howe

Freya Bardell

Leticia Huerta

Roberto L. Delgado

John O'Brien

Kyungmi Shin

Russell Rock

Jeanie Centouri


Loma Linda:

Juan Navarrete

Patricia Navarrete


Quote:
Juan and Patricia Navarrete have received awards and recognitions for several public art projects around the country. The couple created the "Ice Crystals" hanging sculpture in Fort Collins, Colo., and "Petroglyph Medallions," an installation of 100 copper lamppole sculptures along a 3-mile stretch in downtown Phoenix.

"We want people to get a sense of history and feel invigorated by just being there," Patricia Navarrete said of the Loma Linda art concept.

"The whole idea behind sbX is to enhance the look and livability of neighborhoods," said David Rutherford, spokesman for the project. "We feel that public art will play a role in doing that."
http://www.insidebayarea.com/california/ci_13242190
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  #100  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2009, 8:36 PM
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The Hall of Geological Wonders at the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands has been completed, but the new expansion is still awaiting its exhibits.
http://www.pe.com/localnews/inland/s...9.30cf347.html
Quote:
A $1.9 million grant from the California Cultural and Historical Endowment that will help pay for the exhibits was frozen by the state budget deficit in December, delaying the wing's opening until early 2010, McKernan said.

Those funds would pay for the four largest exhibits in the building, which will house 24 displays. The rest of the $5 million cost of exhibits is coming from county funds, the nonprofit San Bernardino County Museum Association and fundraising efforts, McKernan said.

He acknowledges some frustration with the delay. County officials had hoped to open the new building this spring.

"We're anxious and the community is anxious and the Board of Supervisors is anxious to see it," he said. "We want to start bringing people in as soon as possible."

Mimi Morris, executive officer of the California Cultural and Historical Endowment, said she expects that grants will start going out by the end of May.

"It's really been an ordeal for a lot of our grantees," she said.

The museum has signed up with Platypus Studios, a Pasadena company that specializes in creating replicas, to fabricate the prehistoric creatures for display.

It's not a simple process, McKernan said.

"You don't go to a shelf and pull them off," he said.

And some of the exhibits are complex.

The mastodon exhibit, titled "Life to Death to Discovery," will feature both life-size replicas of the elephant-like prehistoric animals and a fossil find that shows what they look like when paleontologists discover their bones.

The teratorn, a bird of prey with a wingspan of about 16 feet, will be above a catwalk leading to an exhibit showing the relationship between dinosaurs and birds of today.

Some of the exhibits may be ready as soon as September, but McKernan said he wants the entire hall to be complete when the wing opens.

Some features -- an outdoor amphitheater that can seat 60 and a native vegetation garden -- already are finished. There have been concerts in the amphitheater, and the museum hopes to use the venue to highlight local musicians, McKernan said.

For example, at 3 p.m. June 7, when the museum will be open free of charge, Genevieve Duo will perform romantic classical and Celtic songs of harp and flute in the amphitheater.

The museum's vision for the hall is for it to showcase the county's rich geologic and paleontologic history, with a focus on the San Andreas Fault and how it has shaped the region, McKernan said.

"This venue will be like no other venue in North America," he said.




The museum is located two blocks Northeast of the proposed California Street station of the local rail service between San Bernardino and Redlands.
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