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  #2081  
Old Posted Oct 2, 2019, 6:47 PM
Vin Vin is online now
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With mentality like this, no wonder the West Coast had been on its decline since the 70s. Americanism at its best I reckon. Should've retained more of Victoria's British roots instead.
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  #2082  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2019, 9:54 PM
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And you people expect competence from local government?

You must be new to politics


Speaking of Fairfield, I just found out what the boundaries are and they are way further northwest than I thought, they start at Fort and Blanshard so the starbucks on the corner there, the courthouse and the Y are all in Fairfield

https://web.archive.org/web/20091012...irfl_map.shtml
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  #2083  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2019, 11:20 PM
aastra aastra is offline
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I'm pretty sure we talked about it on this very board way back in the glory days of the old Victoria construction threads. I seem to remember the neighbourhood boundary was shown as running down the middle of Fort Street, so if you were walking from Starbucks toward the Capitol 6 you wouldn't even be downtown yet until you were halfway across the crosswalk.

All those times you went to the Royal Theatre to see a movie back in the day or a live show today... you thought you were going downtown but you actually weren't.

The goofy neighbourhood boundaries were invented to encroach and impinge on downtown. The Royal Theatre is all the proof that you could ever need. Why the heck would a neighbourhood like Fairfield have a big ol' downtown theatre in it?
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  #2084  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2019, 11:52 PM
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I'll bet if you asked every single resident of Escher which neighbourhood they live in, you might get one smartass that would say Fairfield and that's it

Quote:
Originally Posted by aastra View Post
The goofy neighbourhood boundaries were invented to encroach and impinge on downtown. The Royal Theatre is all the proof that you could ever need. Why the heck would a neighbourhood like Fairfield have a big ol' downtown theatre in it?
No one considers the southeast section of downtown Fairfield so why would they do that?
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  #2085  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2019, 4:43 PM
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Check this out:

Quote:

Daily Colonist
January 22, 1913

Site Chosen for Location of B.C. Electric Suburban Terminals

A Magnificent Site Has Been Acquired at the Northeast Corner of Pandora Avenue and Douglas Street



MAMMOTH TEN-STOREY BUILDING TO GO UP

Great Structure to Be Permanent Home of Suburban Lines -- Location Is in Very Heart of the City

Exemplifying in the most eloquent fashion the tremendous pace at which Victoria is expanding into a great city and at the same time the unbounded confidence in its future possessed by one of the big commercial institutions of the Dominion, is the announcement which The Colonist is enabled to make that the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, has acquired a large area of property on the northeast corner of Douglas Street and Pandora Avenue as a site on which to erect a mammoth office building which will also house the suburban terminal station to handle the business resultant from the opening of traffic on the tram line to the end of the Saanich Peninsula.

A New Civic Centre

...the cars will reach the building from Douglas Street via Cormorant Street on three tracks running through the terminal station, each track capable of holding trains of three cars each, to Pandora Avenue, down that thoroughfare to Douglas and so out to Saanich.

"In considering the question of locating a site for the suburban terminals we have been impressed with the growing commercial importance of the section where this property is situation, and the company was exceedingly anxious to bring their passengers on the suburban line to the very heart of the city. Pandora Avenue, when the widening work shall have been completed, will be one of the most imposing thoroughfares in the city, running right through to Oak Bay on the east...

Fine Strategical Site

"Then again, we were impressed with the significance which attaches to the determination of the Hudson's Bay Company to errect a great departmental store on the corner of Fisguard and Douglas Street. This one thing in itself has been held by many to suggest that a new centre of civic activity would be constituted in that section..."

For the year 1909 the total number of passengers carried on all the local lines of the company was 5,093,509. Last year (1912) the total was slightly under 11,000,000, or to be exact, 10,976,690. The increase in the three years has aggregated no less than 116 per cent, a showing which few cities in the country can make.

The rapid growth of the city and the building up, especially, of the outlying sections, has necessitated extensions to the system, the Ross Bay, Hillside Avenue and Burnside Avenue extensions as well as the double tracking of many sections of the old routes...
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  #2086  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2019, 4:49 PM
aastra aastra is offline
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In the early 1910s it seems there were four ten-story buildings in the works at the same time:
  • Permanent Loan Building at Douglas and Johnson - Eventually built, but now demolished
  • Weiler Building at Douglas and Kane (now Broughton) - Never built
  • Rorison/Albion Trust Building at Wharf and Government (future Imperial Oil Station/Tourism Victoria property?) - Never built, but plenty of blasting/excavation
  • B.C. Electric Terminal Building at Douglas and Pandora - Never built

****

More about the mysterious Rorison Building:

Quote:
Daily Colonist
August 7, 1912

Among the larger deals is the Rorison building... This will be a ten storey building with a basement and sub-basement, the latter opening out directly on the bay. The building will be 120 feet by 100 feet, with the larger face on Government street. The exterior is to be of pressed brick faced with terra cotta. The floors will be of marble and terrazo...
*****

I suppose these projects are what inspired the following (not sure why they wanted to limit by floor count, if the Empress Hotel and various churches and cathedrals that had lower floor counts were already taller):

Quote:
Daily Colonist
April 9, 2013

Ten Storeys is Limit

By an amendment to the building by-law passed by the City Council last night, the limit of buildings in the city was put at ten storeys. Alderman Dilworth objected, claiming that a person owning a valuable piece of real estate ought to be allowed to erect a structure of greater height...

...the concensus of opinion of the aldermen was to the effect that there is no necessity in Victoria of buildings of greater height than ten storeys.
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Last edited by aastra; Oct 6, 2019 at 2:32 AM.
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  #2087  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2019, 5:06 PM
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Quote:
...not sure why they wanted to limit by floor count, if the Empress Hotel and various churches and cathedrals that had lower floor counts were already taller)
I need to remind myself, in 1913 the Humboldt Street wing of the Empress Hotel doesn't exist yet. The existing wings of the Empress Hotel would have been about as tall as maybe a 10-12 story commercial building.

So I stand corrected, probably the only thing in town at the time that would have been MUCH taller would have been St. Andrew's Cathedral on Blanshard Street. Not sure if St. John the Divine on Quadra Street had its spire yet by 1913.
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  #2088  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2019, 6:23 PM
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cool info astra! 100 years later and we finally got a 6 storey building there
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  #2089  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2019, 9:59 PM
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"Alderman Dilworth objected, claiming that a person owing a valuable piece of real estate ought to be allowed to erect a structure of greater height...." I think he mean't "owning" not "owing" but he was of course, right

It's funny that before the term "nimby" existed" the Weiler Building got reduced from 10 stories to this:



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  #2090  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2019, 2:31 AM
aastra aastra is offline
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That was my typo. I'll fix it. FYI: the 1899 Weiler Building on Government was already ~14 years old by the time that 10-story Weiler proposal was being talked about for Broughton and Douglas. They also owned the 1880s building at Broughton and Broad (which some of us might remember as the old Counting House movie theatre). So it seems the Weilers were trying to get their ducks in a row along Broughton with the proposal for Douglas.

Quote:
Daily Colonist
February 5, 1913

NEW BUILDING TO COST $500,000

Ten-Storey Structure Will Be Erected by Weiler Bros., Ltd., at Corner of Douglas and Kane Streets

Messrs. Weiler Brothers, Ltd., house furnishers, everywhere recognized as among the largest corporations in its line on the American continent, yesterday gave final instructions to the firm's architect, Mr. A. A. Cox of Vancouver to hasten the completion of plans already in the rough so that construction may proceed early this Spring of a massive steel building, ten stories in height, which the company will utilize for its own trade purposes exclusively and which will occupy the site recently purchased from Dr. R. L. Fraser, comprising 120x120 feet at the corner of Douglas and Kane Streets.
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Last edited by aastra; Oct 6, 2019 at 2:56 AM.
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  #2091  
Old Posted Oct 6, 2019, 2:53 AM
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And now that I look further into it, I guess this building is what the 10-story concept was eventually downsized to become a few years later than originally planned.
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  #2092  
Old Posted Oct 7, 2019, 7:45 PM
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At least all the Weiler buildings aren't ugly, and can be preserved.

Worst are those ugly 2-3 storey rebuilts after the original ones are destroyed, like the few along Douglas Street.
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  #2093  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2019, 7:29 PM
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  #2094  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2019, 10:03 AM
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got this last month 8-)



larger - https://imgur.com/a/6uznejb
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  #2095  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2019, 7:31 PM
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Hey Skylinegazer, was this taken from the Medical building on View and Cook?

I posted a few aerial shots in the Canada section you can find here
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  #2096  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2019, 9:28 PM
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Great photos Zoomer!
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  #2097  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2019, 3:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoomer View Post
Hey Skylinegazer, was this taken from the Medical building on View and Cook?
actually it was taken from 1112 Fort St., the old BC Ferries building

and rad photos BTW!
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  #2098  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2019, 4:57 PM
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We've got a new entry in the history of the housing crisis (at the bottom of this list):

Quote:
Daily Colonist
March 10, 1946

Housing Delays

Under the caption of "What's holding up housing," The Financial Post last week summarized present conditions across Canada as disappointing, and without the results that this nation had looked for.

"Looked at from any angle, Government attempts so far to solve the housing crisis have fallen tragically short of the mark..."

"Today we have scores of thousands of families cooped up in overcrowded living quarters and the situation is getting more desperate every week...
Quote:
Daily Colonist
October 15, 1967

Housing Crisis Stymies B.C.

Trade Minister Loffmark appearing on television recently, made some viewers angry when he called public housing projects "ghettoes." He claims they relegate a growing number of Canadians to the status of perpetual renters and make the government a landlord, both bad.

Attorny General Bonner... made it clear that public housing is viewed with considerable official disfavor here.

...in the end it is Ottawa -- not B.C. -- which holds the key to the housing crisis.

...the question is really the basic one of whether Canadians shall continue to own their own homes or whether we become a nation of tenants.

...the prospects of the average working man owning his own home today are so remote as to be practically out of sight.

B.C. spokesmen obviously see a diminishing role for the single family dwelling in Victoria and Vancouver. They would like to encourage more self-owned apartments and row houses, and last session passed a Strata Titles Act which permits this.
Quote:
Daily Colonist
December 6, 1967

City, Candidates Looking for Votes

(one candidate's statment below)

"I believe that we must also face our housing crisis realistically. The present city program of urban renewal and slum clearance is not progressing quickly enough."

(aastra says: it progressed pretty damn quickly in the Blanshard-Rose neighbourhood and in the Cormorant Street section of Chinatown -- the former to facilitate the city's Blanshard Street extension and the latter to facilitate the city's Centennial Square project)
Quote:
Daily Colonist
December 12, 1967

B.C. Starts Blitz on Homes Crisis

Establishment of a central housing authority, involving all three levels of government, to attack the acute housing crisis in BC was announced Monday by the provincial government.
Quote:
Daily Colonist
March 6, 1968

Victorians Tackle Homes Crisis

The Community Welfare Council has announced plans for a meeting of organizations interested in solutions to Victoria's housing crisis.

The council will meet Friday to draw up an agenda...
Quote:
Daily Colonist
August 31, 1968

Rent Controls Suggested to Solve Housing Crisis

Governments may be forced into rent control until the housing crisis is solved, Saaanich Ald. Edith Gunning suggested Friday.

Big Problem
"I don't know what to do until there are enough houses available, except to go into rent control."

Older Homes
"Saanich has tried to do something by buying older houses to rent to low-income families, but that seems to be falling through because there are no suitable houses on the market."

"There are so many factors beyond our control -- high land prices, and high interest costs are the main ones. I've never been in favor of rent controls, but you wonder what else can be done to keep rents at a reasonable level."

...the crisis has reached such proportions that all reasonable solutions will have to be considered.
Quote:
Daily Colonist
January 7, 1969

Pump-Priming Fund Urged for City Housing

- Saanich sets up council committee to tackle housing crises; Oak Bay's future tied to townhouses and garden courts

Mayor Hugh Stephen proposed Monday that Victoria set up a $150,000 pump-priming fund that could result in construction of $3,000,000 worth of low-rental housing in the city.

Among the mayor's proposals for this year were:

- a new zoning concept for downtown development
Quote:
Daily Colonist
April 2, 1969

Rigid Bylaws Blamed for House Shortage

A Victoria architect-planner - D.M. Cowin - Tuesday blamed the housing crisis on municipalities because of their rigid bylaws and told Saanich housing committee that its municipality was one of the worst offenders.

The committee later was less than enthusiastic about Mr. Cowin's proposal for helping to ease the housing crisis in Saanich by the construction of at least 20 patio dwelling units.

He said Transport Minister Paul Hellyer's housing report stressed the need for freedom of choice but a home-seeker has only two options - "a single-family residence at a cost he can't afford or a filing cabinet unsuitable for family living."

He said it was time to base calculations on people instead of on buildings and to set performance standards determining the number of persons per acre, the minimum open areas per person, the distance between opposite windows and the capacities of streets and services.

The patio housing proposal calls for the use of "industrialized" (prefabricated) houses which would be assembled on the building site at a saving of from 12/5 to 15 per cent of conventional costs.

Quote:
Daily Colonist
September 7, 1969

"There's No Place to Go in City"
Rent increases, apathy, shortage of housing hit pensioners, Indians, people with children

"Landlords are becoming extortionists, helped by the housing crisis, the tearing down of older houses..."

The bitter comment came Saturday from a 70-year-old pensioner who can either leave his housekeeping room or pay a $5 a month rent increase.

"Please don't use my name, or I shall get an eviction notice, and there's just no place to go in the city," he added.

The pensioner was just one more victim of a housing crisis which hit Victoria about three years ago...

...there's a need for about 1,200 housing units in Victoria, and today's bleak picture is unlikely to change at least during the next two years.

Other families, unable to pay high rents or unacceptable to landlords because they have children or pets, are doubling up in substandard accommodation.

...rent for apartments, duplexes, houses and housekeeping rooms is being increased two or three times a year, while older houses are being torn down to make way for expensive apartment blocks.

"I don't quite know who they're going to put into the new apartment blocks,"

"The pensioners can't afford to go in, and people with children wouldn't be allowed, even if they could pay the rent."

The destruction of older houses that have been used as suites for families and housekeeping rooms for pensioners distresses both the elderly and those who work in housing.

"There just aren't enough houses now, and these people who are moved out to make way for apartments have no place to go,"

"So many places that are for rent are only temporary because they are to be pulled down for apartments,"

Silver Threads director... also complained about spiralling rents, temporary housing, and tenement-like conditions.

"The plaster has been off the walls, linoleum torn, and not a lick of paint on the places. The landlord will say openly that he has no intention of doing anything, and he doesn't care if he rents or not."

"A city lot will sell for $7,000 to $8,000, so it really doesn't matter too much to him,"
Quote:
Daily Colonist
September 14, 1969

Efforts for Two Years May Ease House Crisis

Efforts are being made by both government and private agencies to solve Victoria's housing crisis, and the worst problems could be over in about two years time, says Victoria assistant city manager William Hooson.

...the first limited-dividend building in Victoria will be a 20-storey apartment at Fort and Quadra, intended mainly for pensioners.

(aastra says: also known as View Towers)
Quote:
Daily Colonist
September 14, 1969

Squeeze Is On
High Density Inevitable

The housing squeeze tightened up another notch Monday, when the federal government's Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation interest rates go up to 9.5 per cent.

The day of the single-family home, so long considered the natural aspiration of everyone, may be just about over in Canada, said Mr. Jackson (Philip G. Jackson, president of Victoria Real Estate Board).

Condominium housing -- in effect, row housing or apartments put up for shared ownership rather than for rent -- may be the only way for the average man to own his own four walls in the future...

But in Canada condominium housing is a relatively new idea and lending institutions are not used to it.
Quote:
Daily Colonist
September 24, 1976

Question answered with suite bonanza

There are signs that the housing shortage in Victoria will be greatly relieved -- if not eliminated -- in the next 12 months.

The housing construction boom expected to begin shortly will produce at estimated 2,000 apartment units. The city's engineering department is processing about $60 million worth of buildings permit applications.

...the 2,000 units would "make a sizeable dent" in the city's housing shortage.

There are 34 or 35 projects involved, comprising the 2,000 units: all projects are of the four-storey frame construction type.

All will have reasonably-priced rental accommodation because they will be partly financed by federal low-interest money.

City officials say there isn't a condominium project among the 34.

Builders feared that the commission might rule against the four storeys, allowing only three-storey frame buildings.

Quote:
Globe and Mail
20 March 1980

REPORT ON CANADA CMHC study


Greater Vancouver has the most serious housing shortage in North America, says a study released by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.

The corporation also disclosed that: Victoria and Vancouver rank first and second in Canada for the lowest vacancy rate.
Quote:
Vancouver Sun
19 October 1989

Housing Crisis Rally

Dozens of families are expected to march on Victoria city hall this morning. They want council to use its influence to get the province to ban adult-only apartment buildings. The rally is sponsored by Citizens for Affordable Housing, a citizens' pressure group which has grown up in response to Victoria's housing crisis.
Quote:
The Province
22 November 1989

RENTAL CARROT: VICTORIA OFFERS RATE CUT TO DEVELOPERS

Victoria is handing out $20 million to B.C. developers to build about 2,000 rental-housing units.

But critics say the scheme will do more for developers than for people needing affordable housing.

New Democratic Party housing critic Robin Blencoe said the plan will do nothing to create affordable housing in the province.

"All this does is build housing units that most British Columbians can't afford, and it uses taxpayers' dollars to do it," said the Victoria MLA. "This isn't a trickle-down theory - it's a drip."

"It really will do virtually nothing to ease the housing crisis," he said.
Quote:
Vancouver Sun
28 February 1990

Victoria, municipalities agree to seek solutions to rental housing crisis

The provincial government and the Union of B.C. Municipalities came to a meeting of the minds Tuesday over the housing crisis, and have agreed to jointly look at solutions, UBCM president Len Traboulay said.

...the provincial review, which will be conducted between the UBCM and staff from the ministries of municipal affairs, social services and housing, finance and labor and consumer services, are aimed at shepherding amending legislation through the next sitting of the legislature.

Those changes will hopefully address secondary suites, affordability and availability of suites, rent review and elimination of discrimination against couples with children...
Quote:
Vancouver Sun
02 August 1990

B.C. rental crisis worst in country: Situation 'gross' for Victoria, Vancouver

The rental housing crisis in Victoria and Vancouver is worse than anywhere else in Canada, a new study shows.

"For renters, the situation appears to be deteriorating,"

...the proportion of renters paying more than 30 per cent of their gross incomes for housing was higher in Greater Victoria than anywhere else in Canada.

...about 20 per cent of Victoria renters were paying more than half their gross income for rent.

Social planners generally say no one should have to pay more than 30 per cent of their income for housing.

...48 per cent of Victoria's renters were in fact paying more than that. In Vancouver, the figure was 45 per cent.

...the problem has worsened in the past year or so because "rent increases are generally outpacing incomes."

...the problem is likely to continue to worsen because the region is facing a severe shortage of land zoned and serviced for rental housing.

The average rent increase in the past year has been 11 per cent.

...municipalities should require new subdivisions and housing projects to include 20 per cent of their units as "affordable rental units."
Quote:
Vancouver Sun
29 May 1993

Trouble in the Garden: Behind Victoria's grand facade lies a crisis in affordable housing

CRISIS? WHAT CRISIS?

...all's quiet down on the waterfront in the James Bay district overlooking the inner harbor, where... the classy, brick-faced Harbourside condo towers are all sold out save for a couple of suites for $320,000 and $580,000.

Yet across town... Kaye Melliship, intense and intelligent, is fighting a lone and losing battle to generate more affordable housing and stave off what she perceives as the "serious housing crisis" that has Victoria in its grip.

A planner with the Capital Region Housing Corp., Melliship says she can't find any affordable housing for her waiting list of 1,060 families, 361 seniors and 154 disabled people who, for a variety of reasons, require less expensive accommodation.

"There is a vast need for affordable housing right now in Victoria. We know that 20,000 to 30,000 households are paying too much for their housing and could require some assistance to make ends meet," she says.

Defining affordable as the ability for low- and moderate-income families to have rental and ownership opportunities that cost 30 per cent or less of their income, she points out that Victoria is the most difficult city in Canada for people to get out of renting and buy their own place.

Only 7.5 per cent of renters in Victoria can afford to buy a house or condominium of their own compared with 20.5 per cent in Vancouver, 27 per cent in Toronto and 35 per cent in Montreal.

She sees a number of barriers to affordable housing:

* Lack of municipal policies, plans and strategies.
* A dramatic cut in capital funds from senior government for non-market housing.
* High cost of land and absence of land servicing.
* No-growth policies in communities due to constraints in the capacity of infrastructure and community values.
* Lengthy development approval processes.

Les Bjola, president of Victoria Real Estate Board, agrees that there is a great need for more affordable housing, but he believes the problem stems from two key issues: an increasing shortage of developable land and the lack of quality regional planning.

"The land shortage is even more pronounced here than in Vancouver...

Melliship and Bjola are concerned about the way 1,200 acres of land in the Tod Inlet area and 1,800 acres south in the Highlands district of Langford will ultimately be developed. They would like to see the land developed in a way that permits higher densities, which would generate more affordable housing.
Quote:
Times-Colonist
08 July 2002

It's tough finding rental units: Proposed revisions to tenancy act could make situation worse

For students and other renters on a tight budget... finding a place to live in Victoria is difficult.

Peggy Prill, a market analyst with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation calls Victoria a "constrained" market.

When the corporation measured the vacancy rate of the region's rentals last October, it sat at 0.5 per cent -- that's equal to 130 of the region's 26,000 units available.

A healthy vacancy rate is at about two per cent, she said.

Prill said there are many reasons for the housing shortage.

The problem is compounded by the fact there have been no new rental units built for over 20 years and population has grown steadily, especially among students who return to the city for school each September.
Quote:
Times Colonist
January 14, 2005

City council rejects second application for James Bay towers

Victoria council showed little appetite Thursday for new residential towers in James Bay when it rejected two proposals for apartment buildings.

Reg Stewart and his family wanted to build the first private-sector rental accommodation in the neighbourhood since the 1970s. However, council rejected rezoning applications by companies linked to the family for 16-storey and 12-storey towers opposed by most neighbouring residents.

Mark Johnston, a consultant and former city administrator representing the Stewarts, said the projects would provide badly needed rental accommodation for the city.

The proposed towers would have gone up next to the existing buildings developed by the Stewarts several decades ago -- the Goodacre Towers, Regent Towers and Charter House buildings. Their proposal also offered $400,000 for the James Bay New Horizons seniors centre for a food-services facility.

The city planning department said this fell way short of the $3-million cash benefit required under the city's "density bonus" policy...

Mayor Alan Lowe said while the city needs more rental accommodation, the proposals were "too big and too dense." Towers built in the 1970s could no longer serve as the model for James Bay...

Coun. Pamela Madoff said that neighbourhood was effectively "downzoned" in the 1970s after residents complained about too many tall buildings...

Quote:
CBC News
November 10, 2006

Victoria launches homelessness strategy

Victoria city council has invited anti-poverty activists to work on its new housing strategy committee, which will try to come up with solutions for the estimated 2,000 homeless in the capital.

...councillors prepared to hear from dozens of people who have been lobbying council for less talk and more action.

But after hearing from just one speaker, Coun. Sonya Chandler announced plans to create a housing strategy committee, and invited the ad hoc citizens group to join it.

"I think that there's some pretty immediate stuff that can happen, that can satisfy everybody," she told the crowd.

The group has asked the city to create 50 more emergency shelter beds and to seize abandoned buildings downtown and convert them into affordable housing units.
Quote:
Aging population in financial limbo and a housing crisis
Times-Colonist
December 30, 2014

...thousands of Victorians are struggling to live below the poverty line, an increasing number of them approaching or well past the retirement years.

"The trend is the population in general is aging, which includes people in the poorest sectors. But there are significant affordability issues [in Victoria] as well,"

With the Victoria rental vacancy rate dropping to 1.5 per cent in October from 2.8 per cent in the same month last year and the average cost of a bachelor apartment more than $700 a month, elderly singles on a basic pension have few options.
Quote:
CTV Vancouver Island
November 28, 2017

There's good and bad news for renters in one of the country's tightest markets: Greater Victoria's vacancy rate is slightly up – but average monthly rents have increased sharply.

New data from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation shows that the capital city's overall vacancy rate has risen to 0.7 per cent.

That's up from 0.5 per cent, which was among the lowest vacancy rates in Canadian cities.

But the CMHC report says the average rent in Greater Victoria is now $1,072 – up 7.7 per cent from $994 in 2016.

It's the largest year-over-year increase since 1991, and CMHC says it mirrors accelerated prices in the home ownership market.

"Metro Victoria's rental market remains tight. Supply has not kept up with population growth and a shift away from homeownership," senior market analyst Braden Batch said...
Quote:
Times-Colonist
February 17, 2019

Comment: Step up or step aside, developers

The rapid price escalation of real estate has effectively erased many first-time homebuyers’ downpayments, and where the flow of renters into homeownership has frozen, adding to the competition for rental units.

With a generation shut out of homeownership, and competition for rentals fierce, people with any sign that they are different don’t have a snowball's chance in hell of securing a place to live.
Quote:
Times-Colonist
October 25, 2019

...council wasn't in the middle of a housing crisis when it approved the official community plan in 2012 or it might look far different today.

"Putting this amount of housing and this amount of density on this site responds to the housing crisis..."

(article: "Victoria council OKs four-tower Harris Green project that includes fire hall and housing")
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Old Posted Oct 31, 2019, 4:49 PM
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