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  #401  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2015, 6:04 PM
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Infographic: The New New York Skyline:

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ne...own-manhattan/
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  #402  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2015, 5:10 PM
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From the Times today about 7 Bryant Park, which is quite striking in person:

7 Bryant Park Embraces Its Place in the City
By MICHAEL KIMMELMANNOV. 18, 2015


With little fanfare, an eye-catching work of corporate architecture has landed in Midtown: a 30-story, glass-and-stainless-steel building called 7 Bryant Park, between 39th and 40th Streets, along Sixth Avenue.

For months, I grumbled passing the construction site. The project was blocking views of the super-slim, hexagon-shaped Springs Mills Building next door, a green-glass International Style landmark from the early 1960s, by Harrison & Abramovitz. That building is a modernist jewel box. I often detour through the lobby because it’s so beautiful. It’s part of my private stash of city treasures, which all New Yorkers keep.

Then the scaffolding came down.

I’m not saying 7 Bryant Park is architecture for the ages. It’s not.

But the building clearly is not just another spec office tower, or at least it wasn’t designed to look like one. It makes the case for why architecture matters.

It’s a two-tiered midrise, with a setback a third of the way up and an arresting pair of cones incised almost as if by a giant ice-cream scooper out of one corner, the one facing the park. The first cone rises from the setback to the roof. The other, opening downward, clears space for a circular canopy, made of steel, hovering, a little like the Starship Enterprise, above the building’s entrance.

The building's entrance facing the park. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times
The effect is something akin to a flashing Broadway billboard, begging for attention. Hines was the developer. The architects are Yvonne Szeto and Harry Cobb from Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. Mr. Cobb’s Tour EDF in Paris, an elliptical skyscraper with a similar conical cavity, built for France’s main electric company in 2001, will come to mind among architecture aficionados.

The soft-spoken Mr. Cobb is 89. In his long, distinguished career, as teacher and designer, he has also overseen, among much else, Goldman Sachs’s bespoke headquarters in Lower Manhattan and the storied John Hancock Tower in Boston.

That building, one of the most beautiful skyscrapers ever built, an austere, double-notched rhomboid in the historic city center, has always stood out and blended in, its disappearing, wafer-thin profile and glass skin deferentially reflecting H. H. Richardson’s Trinity Church next door.

7 Bryant Park, center, with a conical cutout rising to the roof. Credit Chang W. Lee/The New York Times
Without approaching Hancock in grace or invention, 7 Bryant Park aspires to be what Mr. Cobb has categorized as a “contingent” building: “not self-centered or autonomous,” as he has put it, “but shaped by its place, its context.”

The context here is the park, diagonally across the street, to which the tower’s sculptured cones clearly gesture. Two blocks north, the much taller Bank of America Tower commands the skyline: It’s a crystalline behemoth and tent pole for the northwest edge of the park. Commercial property values start to drop south of 42nd Street, and the architecture changes, as well, getting less ambitious.

But 7 Bryant Park takes advantage of its location near the park’s southwest corner, as if to declare itself the Bank of America building’s little brother, which is to say, part of the uptown crowd. The logic is economical, not just architectural. Mr. Cobb is fond of Wittgenstein’s famous remark to the effect that just as every movement of the body isn’t a gesture, every building isn’t architecture. Translation: Architecture is a dividend that pays off when properly invested. The Bank of China bought 7 Bryant Park from Hines earlier this year.

There’s a civic dividend, too. The building’s entrance is now a modest plaza, with a fountain and bench, where passers-by can briefly sidestep the usual crush of office workers and maybe rendezvous with a friend. (“I’ll meet you under the Star Trek canopy” is a phrase I can almost imagine catching on.) Mr. Cobb also likes to say “a building should be a good citizen; it should make a place in the city.”

I might put it this way: Streets are more significant than buildings, and smart buildings make the most of this fact. Hines volunteered the plaza and forked over for a new subway entrance inside the tower, at 39th Street, to free up sidewalk acreage.

For their part, the architects found a way to animate the facade so that, seen from the park, it plays off its neighbors, the stately rhythm of its 10-foot-wide modular windows syncopating with the busier window patterns of the buildings around it. From inside, those modules open up the office floors of 7 Bryant Park to the outdoors, generously. Where the windows curve and incline to shape the cones, the effect is akin to standing on the prow of a ship, gazing down.

From outside, the wide modules ensure that the cones don’t become a distracting muddle of mullions when the building turns the corner. It’s an elegant, sculptural solution.

In the evening, colored lights in the spandrels outline a kind of mirrored Christmas tree. Artists talk about creativity feeding off restraints, self-imposed or otherwise, a truism architects have to live by. Mr. Cobb and Ms. Szeto capitalized on the limitation of a city setback rule to sharpen the points where the two cones meet. So there’s also a crispness and concision to the geometry, derived partly from necessity.

The other day, I watched gawkers in the park point at the new building, struck by the cones and the canopy: 7 Bryant Park is the latest Times Square attraction. I still miss seeing the block-length facade of the Springs Mills Building along Sixth Avenue. But I have to admit that too many mediocre commercial projects gets a pass in this city, making developers money while shortchanging the rest of us. This one by Hines, Ms. Szeto and Mr. Cobb could have been another one of those buildings. For being otherwise, they and it deserve a shout out.
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  #403  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2015, 9:10 PM
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Mayor Bill de Blasio has decided to tamp down on hotel development in industrial zones, but dozens of hotels are already on the rise in Long Island City’s manufacturing areas. YIMBY has a rendering of a 20-story hotel in the works there at 52-09 31st Place, in a particularly forlorn and polluted micro-hood known as Blissville.

The neighborhood is bounded by Hunters Point Avenue, Calvary Cemetery, and Newtown Creek, and further hemmed in by the elevated Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. Back in the 19th century, Blissville was known for being home to some of the city’s most polluting and malodorous industries, like chemical factories, soap makers, petroleum processors, fertilizer factories. Now, auto repair shops, warehouses, and building supply companies populate most of its low-slung commercial buildings.

The hotel will reach 210 feet into the air on a parcel just south of the BQE, between Bradley and Starr Avenues and just around the corner from Silvercup Studios. It’ll hold 200 rooms and 101,410 square feet of commercial space.

The first two floors will have a lobby, retail, conference rooms, and a dining hall. Floors three through 19 will host seven to 14 hotel rooms per story. Amenity spaces, like a gym and conference area, will fill the top floor, and there will be a roof deck. 51 parking spots will be divided between the cellar and first floor.

Forest Hills-based ARC Architecture and Design are the architects, and the developer is Delwar Hussain, who heads an LLC headquartered in Syosset, N.Y.
=====================
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  #404  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2015, 9:27 PM
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  #405  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 12:02 AM
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  #406  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 6:58 PM
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  #407  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2015, 11:35 PM
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No. 20 East End Avenue Rises in Manhattan's Upper East Side


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Architect Robert A.M. Stern is known for a wide range of architectural styles, ranging from Postmodern works in his early career to the New Classical-style towers that have become his recent calling card. One such historic-inspired tower, Corigin Real Estate Group's No. 20 East End Avenue, is now nearing structural completion at the intersection of 80th Street and East End Avenue in New York City's Upper East Side.
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  #408  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2015, 5:32 PM
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There should be a law passed requiring that every post-war, residential turd in the city be torn down and replaced with something like that.
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  #409  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2015, 11:29 PM
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  #410  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2015, 2:50 AM
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Project: 1665 Jerome Avenue



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The 13-story building will fill a long-vacant lot at 1665 Jerome Avenue, across the street from a ramp to the Cross-Bronx Expressway.

The development will reach 136 feet into the air and have 71 supportive housing units. Children aging out of foster care will live in the building, according to building permits filed back in 2012.

The housing will fill 58,000 square feet of community facility space on the fourth through 13th floors. The ground floor will host 4,600 square feet of retail, and a job training facility will occupy most of the second and third floors. The third floor will also have recreation space, a kitchenette, and offices for the non-profit running the building. Residents will be able to take advantage of a green roof and a shared roof terrace on the top floor.

The exterior will be modern and functional, and the facade will be clad in a mix of brick veneer, precast stone, and synthetic stucco. The design will certainly help revitalize the block, which is populated with auto shops, just like the rest of Jerome Avenue.

Body-Lawson Architects is designing the project.
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  #411  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2015, 8:53 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | 225 East Houston Street | 120 FT | 12 FLOORS

Project: 225 East Houston Street



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Here it comes. The Provident Loan Society building on East Houston Street is one step closer to sprouting a twelve-story (120-foot) tumor.

Owners Elsa and Dunnie Lai together filed paperwork for the $15 million project with the Department of Buildings ten days ago. As previously reported, plans call for a 41,000 square-foot transformation of the un-protected Provident Loan Society branch at 223-225 East Houston. Cutting to the chase, that equates to 38 apartments plus several recreational terraces and fitness rooms for tenants (34,200 square-feet). There is also bicycle storage with twelve spaces and commercial retail, presumably on the ground floor (6,800 square-feet).

Last month, we first revealed the potential eyesore to erupt from 223-225 East Houston. An ugly corner-hogger, at best. However, the renderings revealed probably won’t reflect the final product. The company believed to be the architect at the helm is now denying involvement. Bluarch principal Antonio Di Oronzo previously told DNAinfo that the firm is no longer working with the property owners. Not since last December, at least.
=======================
http://www.boweryboogie.com/2015/11/...ouston-street/
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  #412  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2015, 1:27 AM
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Project: 111 East 172nd Street



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Nonprofit Community Access filed plans Wednesday for a 126-unit,14-story apartment building at 111 East 172nd Street in the Bronx.

The Lower Manhattan-based organization, which helps people with psychiatric disabilities transition from shelters to independent living, plans to use more than half the units as “supportive housing” for individuals and families battling mental health or drug problems. The remainder will be affordable units for people making up to 50 percent of the neighborhood’s median income.

Peter Woll is the architect of record for the 107,000-square-foot project, the permit application shows.
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  #413  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2015, 1:33 AM
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Project: 6 Columbus Circle



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The site that is home to 6 Columbus Circle has hit the market, according to marketing materials from Cushman & Wakefield. The 12-story, 88-key boutique hotel allows for a development of up to 63,510 buildable square feet. One source with knowledge of the property, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said it would likely go for $1,400 per buildable square foot, or $88.9 million.

“This is the most spectacular site that we have brought to the market recently in Manhattan because of the views of Central Park,” Robert Knakal, the chairman of New York investment sales at C&W who is marketing the property, told Commercial Observer.

The source said it was likely the building would be razed and a new building erected in its place.
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https://commercialobserver.com/2015/...o-fetch-88-9m/
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  #414  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2015, 3:01 AM
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It's amazing they always seem to target the best looking buildings to demo. Meanwhile the ugly (and much shorter) building next door is left alone!

I am starting to think there's a conspiracy to strip NY piece by piece of all its character.

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  #415  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2015, 10:14 AM
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A jaw dropping feat of engineering for sure-check out the diagrams in the link!

Palace Theater To Be Lifted 29 Feet For Expanded Facilities And Retail
Quote:
Preservation consultant Elise Quasebarth of Higgins Quasebarth & Partners said it was originally built for vaudeville before becoming a movie house and home to other productions and eventually a Broadway theater. When constructed, it was actually surrounded by an office building bearing the “Palace” name. That bulding was removed in 1988.
======
Architect Scott Duenow of PBDW Architects said that the theater, with its 1,700-plus seat capacity, is now encompassed by the 45-story DoubleTree hotel tower. He described it as a separate building, basically a box with an inch-gap.
======

How will it be moved? Put simply, it will be jacked up. Put less simply, some of the current truss would be reinforced and then another part of it would be removed. A protective crate would be constructed around the theater, both above and below ground. Temporary shoring corner towers would also be put in place. Then beams would be inserted for the theater’s new platform before jacks using a telescopic hydraulic system are also inserted.

Then the theater will literally be jacked up one inch at a time
. “After the first inch, the rest is just repetitive,” Mazzo said. After every lift, they will check to make sure everything is going well. He estimates it will take two weeks to lift the theater.
http://www.yimbynews.com/2015/11/pal...nd-retail.html
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  #416  
Old Posted Dec 2, 2015, 4:11 PM
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Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
It's amazing they always seem to target the best looking buildings to demo. Meanwhile the ugly (and much shorter) building next door is left alone!

I am starting to think there's a conspiracy to strip NY piece by piece of all its character.

I absolutely share your frustration. My keen intuition tells me though that the building to its' west will probably also be acquired. They're shooting for a tall development here and they cannot accomplish that with 25 feet of frontage.
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  #417  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2015, 3:49 PM
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SHoP-Designed Complex Planned for Paint Factory Site in Long Island City
http://skyrisecities.com/news/2015/1...ng-island-city
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  #418  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2015, 2:48 AM
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  #419  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2015, 11:15 PM
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Last edited by chris08876; Dec 10, 2015 at 12:13 AM. Reason: Forgot the 3 in "320"
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  #420  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2015, 1:38 AM
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