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  #481  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 3:46 AM
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ardecila ardecila is offline
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Clearly you have no idea how architecture works here... modernism is the exception to the rule. That's okay in historic districts where even new revivalist buildings are required to use certain proportions, colors, and materials, but elsewhere, low-cost is the name of the game and the developer almost always wants something to look historic.

No, the GSA is not involved. You also have to understand Algiers Point (the adjacent neighborhood) which is hardly the type to support modern architecture. I could go further, but it's not really relevant.

Basically, I'm just happy when neo-traditional buildings actually look decent and have good urban form. Federal City (the Marine Corps buildings above) obviously don't meet those criteria, but they're hardly the worst offenders around here.
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  #482  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 4:03 AM
sguil1 sguil1 is offline
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Its a freakin military base! I'm sure the architecture was not their major concern. The space and functionality was probably first on the list. Besides its in algiers, what does it really matter. The important thing is that it is expected to bring about 10,000 military jobs in the next 15 years, plus families and further development to come with its. Not to mention the hundreds of construction jobs.
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  #483  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 2:09 PM
greenparrot greenparrot is offline
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it looks pretty military to me punched up a little....not bad for it's purpose.

All this "architectural" talk going on seems a little elitist. Try to keep on mind everyone is not an architect but just appreciates what they see and like. Kind of reminds me of the art critic that tries to convince us the 2 pieces of pipe welded together is something terrific.
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  #484  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 3:32 PM
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Busy Bee Busy Bee is offline
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^Thank god the incredible generations of architects that shaped our rich architectural heritage in our greatest cities didn't think like that.
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  #485  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 5:03 PM
greenparrot greenparrot is offline
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^Thank god the incredible generations of architects that shaped our rich architectural heritage in our greatest cities didn't think like that.
think like what? I certainly appreciate great architecture but every structure is not going to be a masterpiece treasured through the generations to come. This is a military installation in which the main purpose is function...of which I assume it serves.

I don't know all the architectural jargon....but if a building does not serve a function, belnd in to the surroundings, or its construction does not overcome great technilogical odds or provide some visual pleasure to me...as I define it for ME....it's relevance to ME is limited. I don't care if you call it neo-this or neo-that....it still may be crap. It kind of reminds me of a piece of art in City Park...I think it's a Katrina rememberence or something. I'm sure the intention was great...but it looks like crapola. We can surely create art or buildings that meet a test of relevance and visual appeal.
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  #486  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 7:46 PM
djp4lsu djp4lsu is offline
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I ain't no architect or nothing, but I think that the military buildings look great. They are a whole lot better than they could have been. This city is full of boring brick buildings from the "modern" era of the 1950's-60's. At least the Federal City plans show some details and stuff.
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  #487  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 10:05 PM
inCrescentCity inCrescentCity is offline
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Originally Posted by djp4lsu View Post
I ain't no architect or nothing, but I think that the military buildings look great. They are a whole lot better than they could have been. This city is full of boring brick buildings from the "modern" era of the 1950's-60's. At least the Federal City plans show some details and stuff.
Agreed. It looks like a miniature college campus. It's a nice relief to see these types of buildings being built amid some other, very ugly, buildings under construction in New Orleans.

As long as we are moving further away from the architecture present in our current City Hall/Library, I'm happy.
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  #488  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2009, 10:18 PM
sguil1 sguil1 is offline
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i like the passion i'm seein from this board...bring it
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  #489  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2009, 12:23 AM
Uptowngirl Uptowngirl is offline
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I like the Federal City, Marine buildings as well. For government buildings they look like ok infill style buildings to me. They aren't supposed to be jaw dropping and they do look 110% better than much of the Westbank. Modern yet, with a traditional "look".

There is room for some modernist architecture but a lot of it is pure drek. So many architects don't understand the built environment, and don't understand the people who live and work in and outside of the buildings they create. (Just like Tulane's URBANbuild...which is fucking awful)
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  #490  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2009, 3:01 AM
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Oh boy... I have no personal involvement with the urbanbuild houses, but they have gotten progressively better as the co-ordinators get a better sense of what is needed and push their students to design inside those constraints.

I have less respect for the Make It Right houses in the Lower 9th, as I believe I have mentioned before, because their oddly-sloped roofs are ungainly and tacky-looking.

On the other hand, there is some intangible factor in New Orleans that makes many modern architectural ideas seem out of place, when those ideas would work very well in other cities. It's not that those modern ideas are intrinsically bad, it's just that they are ill-suited for the context of New Orleans. Part of the problem is that there hasn't been much experimentation to see what fits in and what doesn't, since construction activity here occurs at a trickle and most clients aren't willing to take a chance with something new. For awhile, I believed this to be a result of poor-quality work on the part of local modernist architects, but that doesn't account for a few modernist designs that seem very successful (Wall/Willow at Tulane, some older buildings I have found in the Regional Modernism archives, City Hall Annex).

I'm going to try and pressure NORTA to purchase modern streetcars for the Loyola-Convention Center line, so the modern buildings along that route don't seem even more out of context.
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  #491  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2009, 4:14 AM
Uptowngirl Uptowngirl is offline
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I do agree...if there is a Loyola Line it needs modern streetcars, and I dont think even a modern car would look out of place on a St. Claude route either.
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  #492  
Old Posted Sep 29, 2009, 11:08 PM
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Domain Cos. completes Crescent Club
by CityBusiness staff reports


Domain Cos. today held the grand opening of Crescent Club, a $53 million, 228-unit mixed-income housing development built along the Tulane Avenue corridor.

Crescent Club, which features more than 3,000 square feet of retail, is part of Domain’s $125 million multiphase effort to revitalize Tulane Avenue.

Since Hurricane Katrina, Domain has completed nearly 500 housing units in the area, including the 183-unit Preserve and 72-unit Meridian.

Crescent Club was built using nearly $2 million in federal Gulf Opportunity Zone Housing Tax Credits as well as more than $19 million in federal community development block grants. The project is also using GO Zone funding to set aside some units as work force housing for police officers, firemen, teachers and medical and office workers.

Other funding for Crescent Club comes from New York-based Centerline Capital Group, which provided $20.9 million through the syndication of housing tax credits and $10.74 million in permanent financing through Freddie Mac. Bank of America and Regions Bank provided $10.74 million in construction financing. The New Orleans Industrial Development Board provided a real estate tax payment in lieu of taxes, or PILOT, and the city of New Orleans committed approximately $500,000 for infrastructure repairs.

Domain said it has broken ground on The Shops at Crescent Club, a $5 million, 15,000-square-foot retail development expected to be complete in June. It will be across the street from Crescent Club at 3001 Tulane Ave. The Shops at Crescent Club will include restaurants, a bank, a dry cleaner and a nail salon.
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  #493  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2009, 9:16 PM
sguil1 sguil1 is offline
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Crescent club looks great. Here is a rendering of the retail mentioned above. Tulane ave heading in the right direction, still needs a lot of work.

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  #494  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2009, 11:22 PM
sgray sgray is offline
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Cool Tulane Ave.

I saw a suggestion a while back to reduce Tulane Ave. from 6 to 4 lanes to create a landscaped median. If that wouldn't be feasible, maybe there could be other ways to beautify the thoroughfare. The landscaping they're doing on Veterans Blvd. in Jeff Parish is that same kind of vision.
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  #495  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2009, 11:46 PM
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I apologize for not mentioning this sooner, but FEMA is collecting Section 106 comments from members of the public about the upcoming demolition of the Phillis Wheatley and Thomy Lafon Schools. Both of these are wonderful Modernist buildings that ALREADY meet elevation guidelines, despite the fact that they were built in the 1960s (built on stilts). If enough comments in favor of preserving these buildings are collected, then FEMA may deny the Recovery School District's request for funds for demolition, forcing them to re-evaluate their plans.

If you have time, please go to FEMA's Section 106 website and post comments. The comment period closes today - it would be great if some of you could submit comments and help save these buildings.

Wheatley


Lafon
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  #496  
Old Posted Oct 1, 2009, 2:08 PM
greenparrot greenparrot is offline
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I saw a suggestion a while back to reduce Tulane Ave. from 6 to 4 lanes to create a landscaped median. If that wouldn't be feasible, maybe there could be other ways to beautify the thoroughfare. The landscaping they're doing on Veterans Blvd. in Jeff Parish is that same kind of vision.
I love neutral grounds but if they are going to make it 4 lanes I think it would be interesting to have a green buffer between the street and the buildings. I think this would soften the look of the area and make available areas for trees etc on both sides of the street.
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  #497  
Old Posted Oct 1, 2009, 2:18 PM
greenparrot greenparrot is offline
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
I apologize for not mentioning this sooner, but FEMA is collecting Section 106 comments from members of the public about the upcoming demolition of the Phillis Wheatley and Thomy Lafon Schools. Both of these are wonderful Modernist buildings that ALREADY meet elevation guidelines, despite the fact that they were built in the 1960s (built on stilts). If enough comments in favor of preserving these buildings are collected, then FEMA may deny the Recovery School District's request for funds for demolition, forcing them to re-evaluate their plans.

If you have time, please go to FEMA's Section 106 website and post comments. The comment period closes today - it would be great if some of you could submit comments and help save these buildings.

Wheatley


Lafon
I'm not sure these pictures do these building justice but the first one looks kind of interesting though. But specifically why should be against demolition. Economic considerations? i.e. can be renovated to perform its intended purposes cheaper. Archtectural considerations? Based on these pictures kind of a hard sell. I read some of the comments which keep bringing up the term mid-century modern or something like that. Just because it meets the definition of some architectural style of times past does that mean we keep it around?
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  #498  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2009, 1:49 AM
sguil1 sguil1 is offline
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Xavier Pharmacy School Expansion. Was wondering what this project was, always see the cranes right off of I-10 when coming into the city.





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  #499  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2009, 6:13 PM
inCrescentCity inCrescentCity is offline
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Xavier Pharmacy School Expansion. Was wondering what this project was, always see the cranes right off of I-10 when coming into the city.





That looks great, where is it located exactly?

Muses is all topped out and it looks like the basic skeleton is finished. They are working almost exclusively on the inside of the complex now. Phase 2 is under way across the street.

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  #500  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2009, 3:33 AM
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^^ Badass! We need many more of these things around the city, along major corridors.
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