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  #1  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2016, 10:18 PM
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Smile NEW YORK | 1568 Broadway (TSX Broadway) | 470 FT | 46 FLOORS (REDEVELOPMENT)

UPDATED RENDERS


























Redevelopment:

================


Redevelopment Of DoubleTree Hotel Site, 1568 Broadway, Times Square





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In November, the Landmarks Preservation Commission approved the lifting and reconfiguration of the landmarked Palace Theater at 1564 Broadway. Now, thanks to EB-5 documents, we have full renderings of what the DoubleTree Hotel site surrounding it will look like once the redevelopment is finished.

Indianapolis-based Maefield Development purchased the property for $540 million. They worked with the Nederlander Organization, which runs the Palace Theater, PBDW Architects, and preservation consultants Higgins Quasebarth & Partners to come up with a plan to literally raise the entire theater and reconfigure it to allow for a larger lobby and more back of house space.

The changes to the theater are to allow the redevelopment of the hotel that surrounds it. That includes new retail space below the theater, and a large new LED screen on the exterior. It also includes an overall redevelopment of the 45-story hotel tower, which uses the address 1568 Broadway.

Not much is known about the redevelopment at this point, except that there will be 704 rooms and the rendering shows that the aforementioned LED screen is so big it wraps from the southern end of the building on Seventh Avenue all the way to the eastern end of the building on West 47th Street.

EB-5 documents indicate the signage will measure 17,000 square feet in total. That will fall just 1,000 square feet shy of the world’s largest sign, which is also under construction at 7 Times Square, directly across the street from the DoubleTree. Even amongst the bright lights of Times Square, the additional wattage from the two projects combined will be quite substantial.

Actual construction permits have not yet been filed, but early applications indicate the possibility that there will also be condominium units on the site.
Current Tower/Design:


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1) NYY
2) http://wikimapia.org/11264077/Double...l-Times-Square

Last edited by NYguy; Sep 24, 2018 at 4:19 PM. Reason: Update
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  #2  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2016, 8:41 PM
PeterQM PeterQM is offline
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Permits Filed for Times Square Doubletree Hotel Expansion and Palace Theater Upraising
November 20, 2016
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Indiana-based Maefield Development has filed building permits to expand the Times Square DoubleTree Hotel at 1568 Broadway by some 350 rooms. The expansion will nearly double the hotel's room count to 745 suites, and will be facilitated by the redistribution of existing bulk and likely smaller room sizes. The development will also elevate the landmarked Palace Theater by 29 feet. The tower was built around the historic theater by way of a steel and concrete bridge-like structure. The theater's complicated relocation was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission earlier this year.








More info in the post here.
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  #3  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2017, 1:54 PM
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$2B Palace Theatre Redevelopment Progresses With L&L on Board as Equity Partner


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The redevelopment of the Palace Theatre at 1568 Broadway is one step closer to kicking off. L&L Holding Company became an equity and development partner in the project this month—which has an estimated total development cost of $2 billion—along with Fortress and Maefield Development. The three will now work in conjunction with the Nederlander Organization—the Palace Theatre’s owner—to elevate the theater within the Doubletree Guest Suites Times Square hotel it is housed in, and then build retail and entertainment space below it.

“We are thrilled to serve as an equity partner and developer for 1568 Broadway,” L&L Holding Company Chairman and Chief Executive Officer David Levinson told CO. “We look forward to working in collaboration with Maefield and Fortress, and in conjunction with the Nederlander Organization, to create an amazing new mecca for the arts, entertainment, cuisine and lodging in the heart of Times Square.”

J.P. Morgan provided a $250 million senior mortgage to the development partners, according to property records filed with the city yesterday. The loan consolidates $175 million in previous financing on the hotel with a $75 million gap mortgage made by the lender. The new debt allowed for the formal acquisition of all the necessary project components, including the land and all of the signage ownership, a source familiar with the development told Commercial Observer.
=========================
https://commercialobserver.com/2017/...quity-partner/
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  #4  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2017, 6:27 PM
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Look at that great beaux-art building they razed that for the ugly hotel. That really sucks. It's a shame they messed up TS so much in those days.
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  #5  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2017, 7:21 PM
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True^ But the wonderful interior of that building is landmarked and preserved within this building. It is a bit incongruous that nothing remains of the classical exterior, it would be nice if the facade remained here.

That said architectural preservation is almost antithetical to times square. (ts proper not the theatres on the side streets).
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  #6  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by JSsocal View Post
True^ But the wonderful interior of that building is landmarked and preserved within this building. It is a bit incongruous that nothing remains of the classical exterior, it would be nice if the facade remained here.

That said architectural preservation is almost antithetical to times square. (ts proper not the theatres on the side streets).
That's the city's and developers fault and stupid greedy decision making.. Look at London's Picadilly Circus. Although a much less extreme example of an sign district compared to TS, they managed to preserve the old buildings and blend them with modern advertisements to a successful degree. TS could have been more classy if they had kept some older buildings here and there between signs like in Picadilly. Remember, TS used to be full of old beautiful buildings.
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  #7  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 2:03 PM
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Hindsight is 20/20, but the area was hardly desirable for most of the 2nd half of the last century- and in the late 80's the city/developers were poised to do anything to scrub it down.

In my mind the noteworthy losses are the original NYTimes building and the Hotel Astor. I think you're right in that Times square could use a hint more glamour then what's left, but what Times square is now is pretty awe inspiring, and certainly different. For better or worse the current look of TS probably better suits the character of what it is now, (a hyper commercial tourist mecca), then the front door of the theatre district as it used to be.
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  #8  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 2:26 PM
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Originally Posted by JSsocal View Post
Hindsight is 20/20, but the area was hardly desirable for most of the 2nd half of the last century- and in the late 80's the city/developers were poised to do anything to scrub it down.

In my mind the noteworthy losses are the original NYTimes building and the Hotel Astor. I think you're right in that Times square could use a hint more glamour then what's left, but what Times square is now is pretty awe inspiring, and certainly different. For better or worse the current look of TS probably better suits the character of what it is now, (a hyper commercial tourist mecca), then the front door of the theatre district as it used to be.
Absolutely agree! And what it is now has made it the the most visited tourist site in the world.
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  #9  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 4:33 PM
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Eh, what makes it popular is the signage, history and prominence (New Year's Eve ball drop is seen all over the world). If some of the older buildings were around (like the Astor hotel), it'll still be just as popular.

One can argue that the newer buildings will make TS less unique. More and more, cities all over the world are doing their versions of TS and eventually, it's the older buildings in NY with their longer history is what will differentiate NY from many of the newer Johnny-come-lately cities.
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  #10  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 4:55 PM
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Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
Eh, what makes it popular is the signage, history and prominence (New Year's Eve ball drop is seen all over the world). If some of the older buildings were around (like the Astor hotel), it'll still be just as popular.

Exactly, "the signage", which would cover up any architecturally significant building in the area. It wouldn't be as head-spinning or as awe-inspiring an ad and jumbotron mecca if you left multiple gaps in.
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  #11  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 5:12 PM
antinimby antinimby is offline
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Originally Posted by streetscaper View Post
Exactly, "the signage", which would cover up any architecturally significant building in the area. It wouldn't be as head-spinning or as awe-inspiring an ad and jumbotron mecca if you left multiple gaps in.
Not really. If anything the Jumbotrons are getting to be ubiquitous and no longer awe-inspiring. You see them everywhere now. Highways, airports, train stations, etc.

The classic buildings with some signage, neons and a lit up façade are more beautiful. Look at the Paramount building. Just as much a part of Times Square as any. If you took that away and put in another glass box with a large LED screen, TS is a lesser place.
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  #12  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 5:32 PM
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^Absolutely. Television Square is getting on my nerves...
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  #13  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 5:48 PM
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Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
Not really. If anything the Jumbotrons are getting to be ubiquitous and no longer awe-inspiring. You see them everywhere now. Highways, airports, train stations, etc.

The classic buildings with some signage, neons and a lit up façade are more beautiful. Look at the Paramount building. Just as much a part of Times Square as any. If you took that away and put in another glass box with a large LED screen, TS is a lesser place.

If it had stayed the way it was in the 90s (in terms of the size, brightness, and amount of signage), all the other current mini-TimesSquares of the world would certainly have something to say today. But as it stands now, to me at least (and perhaps to the growing millions of tourists that make it the most visited tourist site in the world), TSquare is still leagues above the rest (except for Shibuya/Shinjuku, of course) and is only getting more and more awe-inspiring... Difference of opinion I guess.
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  #14  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 6:00 PM
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Yeah I don't really see why TS gets on the nerves. Granted if your driving through it and have somewhere to go, I get it, but... there aren't many places in the U.S. or world really like it. Very few.

The grandiose, exuberant nature of the place needs to remain, and the more lights, the better. Also the TS body paint girls need to remain. Its part of the culture!
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  #15  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 6:34 PM
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Originally Posted by streetscaper View Post
If it had stayed the way it was in the 90s (in terms of the size, brightness, and amount of signage), all the other current mini-TimesSquares of the world would certainly have something to say today. But as it stands now, to me at least (and perhaps to the growing millions of tourists that make it the most visited tourist site in the world), TSquare is still leagues above the rest (except for Shibuya/Shinjuku, of course) and is only getting more and more awe-inspiring... Difference of opinion I guess.
It was leagues above the rest but like I said, it is becoming less so everyday. Everyone does LED screens now. You see them everywhere. No one is impressed by them anymore.
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  #16  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 7:58 PM
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Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
It was leagues above the rest but like I said, it is becoming less so everyday. Everyone does LED screens now. You see them everywhere. No one is impressed by them anymore.
My argument is: if everyone does LED screens now (as you say), and if TS had remained stagnant, then it wouldn't be as impressive relative to the rest today. Times Square had to forge ahead with more over-the-top screens and signage to keep it more awe-inspiring and head-spinning, and now it has the title of most visited tourist site to thank for it.

(As an aside, I'd also argue that the LEDs you see in Times Square are definitely more impressive than most others seen around the world in terms of size, sharpness, and in the context of being right next to dozens of other gigantic LEDs, not to mention that good-ole NY verticality).

But, again, just a difference of opinion.
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Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 8:07 PM
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Originally Posted by streetscaper View Post
My argument is: if everyone does LED screens now (as you say), and if TS had remained stagnant, then it wouldn't be as impressive relative to the rest today. Times Square had to forge ahead with more over-the-top screens and signage to keep it more awe-inspiring and head-spinning, and now it has the title of most visited tourist site to thank for it.

(As an aside, I'd also argue that the LEDs you see in Times Square are definitely more impressive than most others seen around the world in terms of size, sharpness, and in the context of being right next to dozens of other gigantic LEDs, not to mention that good-ole NY verticality).

But, again, just a difference of opinion.
You are basically saying that keeping some of the better buildings around and intact would somehow kept LED's out. That couldn't be further from the truth. You can have older buildings, newer buildings and LED's. It's not a choice of one or the other.

I guess I need to repeat this a third time because you don't get it. Wiping out all the older buildings, and replacing them with glass boxes with LED screens will make TS more generic. If you keep some of the better older buildings around, they complement the new buildings, not detract from them. It's what makes NY more special than say a Shenzhen or a Tokyo.

And no, even if you put a large LED screen on say, the Astor hotel, you'd still not completely cover it up. And these older buildings shine on the ground level as well because as a pedestrian you can see the ornate artistry on the windows and entrances. Glass is everywhere. Even poor third world countries have shiny glass stores and buildings. They are not really that special anymore.
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Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 8:17 PM
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By the way, this discussion will be all for naught as NYGuy will delete all this "off topic" posts when he sees them.

A total waste of time.
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  #19  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 8:53 PM
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Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
You are basically saying that keeping some of the better buildings around and intact would somehow kept LED's out. That couldn't be further from the truth. You can have older buildings, newer buildings and LED's. It's not a choice of one or the other.
I'm saying that keeping the older buildings around and having them on display for their architectural significance would mean adding minimal or no signage (à la Paramount building) and doing this for multiple sites within TS would create too many gaps for my liking and would be a much less impressive Times Square (like in the 90s).

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I guess I need to repeat this a third time because you don't get it. Wiping out all the older buildings, and replacing them with glass boxes with LED screens will make TS more generic. If you keep some of the better older buildings around, they complement the new buildings, not detract from them. It's what makes NY more special than say a Shenzhen or a Tokyo.
And maybe I need to repeat this a third time because you don't get it. We have a difference of opinion. It's really ok to have one. I'm not seeking to impose mine on yours or make mine appear as fact. Some people think TS is indeed generic, some people think it's awe-inspiring and like no (or almost no) place on earth.

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And no, even if you put a large LED screen on say, the Astor hotel, you'd still not completely cover it up. And these older buildings shine on the ground level as well because as a pedestrian you can see the ornate artistry on the windows and entrances. Glass is everywhere. Even poor third world countries have shiny glass stores and buildings. They are not really that special anymore.
In general, I agree. But, I frankly don't care about the buildings in Times Square because I don't go there to see the architecture per se. Like most tourists, I go there to see the head-spinning, larger than life LEDs and ads and tens-of-thoudands of people moving through and idling in the square (because of all the signage). If we could have all the signage we currently have over all the old buildings. Great!
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  #20  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2017, 9:05 PM
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On the positive, a 1000 sq ft shy of the largest LED sign out there, quite a feat still. TS must have the top 3 in the rankings. TS Edition Hotel I believe will be one the largest, and its almost complete. Sign is up, pixels just need to shine.

Let's be honest, it's at least an improvement over the existing design of the Doubletree Hotel.
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