HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

About The Ads  This week the ad company used in the forum will be monitoring activity and doing some tests to identify any problems which users may be experiencing. If at any time this week you get pop-ups, redirects, etc. as a result of ads please let us know by sending an email to forum@skyscraperpage.com or post in the ads complaint thread. Thank you for your participation.


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 4:51 PM
pj3000's Avatar
pj3000 pj3000 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Pittsburgh & Miami
Posts: 4,057
Cities are founded near water.

Water creates borders.

Borders are, by definition, edges (i.e., extremes).
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 4:54 PM
pj3000's Avatar
pj3000 pj3000 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Pittsburgh & Miami
Posts: 4,057
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post

illinois attempted the same thing with springfield, but the chicago juggernaut eventually proved to be far too powerful to overcome.
The Chicago Juggernauts should be an NFL expansion team
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 4:58 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 2,583
Quote:
Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
Cities are founded near water.

Water creates borders.
Yeah, that's another good point. All of the U.S. cities that grew from a pre-Revolutionary War settlement were probably situated in a way to help defend against being attacked. Many of the oldest cities were probably settled around forts.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 7:46 PM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Norfolk, Va
Posts: 2,148
Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
Isn't it obvious? Water is the reason for their existence, either for travel or as a drinking supply, or both.

Name the biggest city you can that is not its size because of water. Now that's a tough question.
Dallas
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 7:50 PM
pj3000's Avatar
pj3000 pj3000 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Pittsburgh & Miami
Posts: 4,057
^ Atlanta too?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #26  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 7:55 PM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,201
Quote:
Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
Cities are founded near water.

Water creates borders.

Borders are, by definition, edges (i.e., extremes).
California has no big rivers. so by that logic Oregon and California are combined. I mean the border really doesn't exist, except you an tell by looking at the way the cities look. the whole west cost is mixed up.

I mean the rivers going west to east aren't going to divide anything because eat California is a desert like Nevada or se Oregon. I had a few beers and thought that was p important. even if California has made Oregon. technically it has.

Last edited by dubu; Sep 12, 2019 at 8:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #27  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 8:15 PM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 25,275
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubu View Post
California has no big rivers. so by that logic Oregon and California are combined. I mean the border really doesn't exist, except you an tell by looking at the way the cities look. the whole west cost is mixed up.
California was part of the Mexican Cession, Oregon territory was ceded to the US by the British two years earlier in 1846
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 8:27 PM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,201
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
California was part of the Mexican Cession, Oregon territory was ceded to the US by the British two years earlier in 1846
im talking new times. why do you think the whole west cost is legal for mj.

the west cast formed into one
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #29  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 8:29 PM
eschaton eschaton is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2,826
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
Are there any examples of cities being founded specifically based on their centrality within a state that have since become major cities because of it? In and of itself it's not really a compelling reason for a city to succeed. Most cities also pre-date the modern iteration of their state anyway.
Most state capitals were purposefully picked to be a somewhat geographically centrally located.

Of course, a lot languished and didn't become important. But there are plenty of examples that did, like Nashville, Columbus, Indianapolis, Des Moines, Little Rock, Oklahoma City, etc.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #30  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 8:43 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 2,583
Quote:
Originally Posted by dubu View Post
im talking new times. why do you think the whole west cost is legal for mj.

the west cast formed into one
Weed is also legal in Colorado, Massachusetts, and Michigan.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 8:46 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is online now
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 21,295
Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Weed is also legal in Colorado, Massachusetts, and Michigan.
T-minus 110 days here in illinois!!!!

not that i'm counting or anything
__________________
He has to go.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 8:49 PM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,201
wheres the nexet hype?
nv error r

Last edited by dubu; Sep 12, 2019 at 9:39 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #33  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 8:54 PM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,201
so in the end the us west half is all the same shit. its cold here.. its the same there.

there is no where thats safe so ya
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #34  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 9:16 PM
cabasse's Avatar
cabasse cabasse is offline
jacob jensen
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: morningside, atlanta
Posts: 3,497
Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
Isn't it obvious? Water is the reason for their existence, either for travel or as a drinking supply, or both.

Name the biggest city you can that is not its size because of water. Now that's a tough question.

in the US: atlanta, dallas, charlotte, perhaps LA? (at least its downtown)


outside: madrid, milan, mexico city, joburg, probably others
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 9:24 PM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 25,275
Mexico City is where it is because of Tenochtitlan which was initially built on a lake, Texcoco.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 9:33 PM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,201
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #37  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 9:43 PM
dubu's Avatar
dubu dubu is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: bend oregon
Posts: 1,201
well life is but a bitch so it aint so?
color me stueped. i go to some bye
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #38  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 10:13 PM
wwmiv wwmiv is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Austin -> San Antonio -> Columbia -> San Antonio -> Chicago
Posts: 3,814
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin View Post
Are there any examples of cities being founded specifically based on their centrality within a state that have since become major cities because of it? In and of itself it's not really a compelling reason for a city to succeed. Most cities also pre-date the modern iteration of their state anyway.
Austin, Texas
__________________
Metropolitan Central Texas 2018: 5,672,404 (+19.98% over 2010):
San Antonio: 1,532,233 (+15.43%) + Metro Suburbs: 985,803 (+20.94%)
Austin: 964,254 (+22.00%) + Metro Suburbs: 1,204,062 (+30.04%)
Killeen/Temple Metro: 451,679 (+11.44%) + Waco Metro: 271,942 (+15.77%) + Bryan/College Station Metro: 262,431 (+14.77%)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #39  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2019, 10:16 PM
wwmiv wwmiv is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Austin -> San Antonio -> Columbia -> San Antonio -> Chicago
Posts: 3,814
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Most state capitals were purposefully picked to be a somewhat geographically centrally located.

Of course, a lot languished and didn't become important. But there are plenty of examples that did, like Nashville, Columbus, Indianapolis, Des Moines, Little Rock, Oklahoma City, etc.
These cities were all decently sized for their time period relative to their states when they were selected as capital cities. Austin, however, was founded for the specific purpose of being a state capital a la DC and was centrally located for easy access throughout the state.
__________________
Metropolitan Central Texas 2018: 5,672,404 (+19.98% over 2010):
San Antonio: 1,532,233 (+15.43%) + Metro Suburbs: 985,803 (+20.94%)
Austin: 964,254 (+22.00%) + Metro Suburbs: 1,204,062 (+30.04%)
Killeen/Temple Metro: 451,679 (+11.44%) + Waco Metro: 271,942 (+15.77%) + Bryan/College Station Metro: 262,431 (+14.77%)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #40  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2019, 1:33 AM
craigs craigs is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd3189 View Post
San Francisco seems to be the odd one out since it’s pretty centrally located in California.
San Francisco is located well within California's borders because, for several decades, it basically was California. In the earliest decades, San Francisco was the undisputed center of industrial, commercial, legal, and cultural life in the young state. It completely eclipsed Monterey, the capital of Spanish and then Mexican Alta California from 1770 to 1845. Before the railroads, San Francisco was the primary port of entry into the West. Early California essentially grew outward from San Francisco concentrically--the University of California across the bay, Stanford in the farmland to the south, wine country to the north. It was a big city, with hundreds of thousands of residents, when lightly-populated southern California was still referred to as "the cow counties." No other state would have been allowed to carve out any of the heart of young California; borders were never going to be drawn close to San Francisco.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Yeah, that's another good point. All of the U.S. cities that grew from a pre-Revolutionary War settlement were probably situated in a way to help defend against being attacked. Many of the oldest cities were probably settled around forts.
This is certainly true here. Mission Dolores and its attendant village was founded in 1776--but so, then, was the Presidio, a fortified military garrison for the Spanish king's soldiers to guard the entry to San Francisco Bay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dubu View Post
California has no big rivers. so by that logic Oregon and California are combined. I mean the border really doesn't exist, except you an tell by looking at the way the cities look. the whole west cost is mixed up.
California has the 447 mile-long Sacramento River, on which its capital city is situated and for which it is named. When gold was found in the 119 mile-long American River just outside Sacramento in 1847, the ensuing rush, which birthed the modern state, saw thousands of people from all over the world sail into San Francisco Bay, through the Sacramento-San Joaquin river delta, and upriver to the gold country. It was the primary "highway" for people and goods between the port of San Francisco and all points east. In turn, Sacramento--at the confluence of the two rivers--became the state capital, and cemented its bright future as the overland terminus of the Pony Express and, later, the first Transcontinental Railroad.

California also has the 366 mile-long San Joaquin River, which flows north through Fresno, Merced, Modesto, and Stockton, where it joins with the Sacramento River in the aforementioned delta.

Now, these rivers may not seem big when compared to the Columbia or the Missouri or whatever, but they are big enough to have made a huge impact on why, and how, early California was developed and populated.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:37 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.