HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Portland > Transportation & Infrastructure

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #2221  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2008, 1:15 AM
tworivers's Avatar
tworivers tworivers is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Portland/Cascadia
Posts: 2,491
Heck of a deck
POSTED: 02:23 PM PDT Thursday, July 10, 2008
BY LIBBY TUCKER (DJC)

Contractors building the downtown transit mall began work on the Steel Bridge this month to tie the new green line tracks to the existing light rail lines. I talked to the chief engineer on the bridge portion, Mark Dorn with URS Corp., earlier this week about what exactly they'll be doing.

Dorn said that the original plan was to tear up the old deck on the steel bridge to install the new tracks. To save some money, they decided to pour over the old section. That means the new track will be higher than the rest of the lanes and cars will no longer be allowed in the center of the bridge.

That's good news for TriMet scheduling, bad for drivers who will only get one lane back when the bridge reopens at the end of the summer.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2222  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2008, 3:23 AM
MarkDaMan's Avatar
MarkDaMan MarkDaMan is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Portland
Posts: 6,804
^poor drivers...

Are they going to fix the problem with trains having to travel slower than peds walking to get across the bridge?
__________________
make paradise, tear up a parking lot
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2223  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2008, 10:58 AM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 671
Quote:
Originally Posted by tworivers View Post
That means the new track will be higher than the rest of the lanes and cars will no longer be allowed in the center of the bridge.

That's good news for TriMet scheduling, bad for drivers who will only get one lane back when the bridge reopens at the end of the summer.
TriMet needs to take over the upper span of the bridge entirely (and the whole bridge in fact) to ensure it has the capacity TriMet needs for future system optimization. It's the biggest bottleneck in the LRT system...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2224  
Old Posted Jul 12, 2008, 10:52 PM
NJD's Avatar
NJD NJD is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 632
^ Trimet has talked to odot and Union Pacific about taking on the entire upper deck lease, but have said (during the initial Mall project meetings) that at the current rate of expansion that it will not need to happen for 20-50 years. We have also heard that a subway may happen in 40-50 years if ridership numbers increase enough to get federal funding, so we may not ever see this happen. Also, the streetcar loop committee is looking to make the streetcar tracks from the proposed Porter-Sherman transit bridge to the existing eastside MAX line 'light rail accessible' to allow MAX trains to bypass the Steel Bridge when necessary. Funding problems for the streetcar loop may hinder the concept though.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2225  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2008, 8:29 PM
pdxman's Avatar
pdxman pdxman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,037
Will Trimet be next to cut biodiesel?

My instincts say no, mainly because it seems as though they've invested too much in to it to pull the plug, but who knows? Other than regular diesel maybe they'll start using CNG, I've heard its much cheaper comparatively.


LTD to stop using biodiesel, citing price, performance
BY MATT COOPER
The Register-Guard
Published: July 19, 2008 12:00AM

Lane Transit District said Friday that it will stop running biodiesel, calling the alternative fuel expensive and questionable in performance during a yearlong test in 10 buses.

The move was the latest bit of bad news for an emerging alternative fuel industry defending itself amid rising gas prices and questions about the “green” fuel’s environmental impacts.

The transit district, which began testing biodiesel in May 2007, found its cost was an average of 5 to 16 cents more per gallon than conventional diesel. Given LTD goes through 1 million gallons of fuel annually, the extra cost adds up quickly, officials said: An increase of a penny adds $10,000 to fuel costs, for example.

The district blames the rising cost of conventional gas for plans to cut service substantially later this year. It can ill afford to experiment with even pricier alternative fuels at riders’ expense, spokesman Andy Vobora said.

“We want to have practices that are sustainable — in the sense they’re economically sustainable as well as environmentally,” he added.

Biodiesel, commonly made from oil-producing plants or cooking-oil waste, can be blended with conventional diesel in different ratios to run in diesel engines.

Ian Hill, co-founder of Oregon-based SeQuential Biofuels, which provided biodiesel for the bus district, said cost concerns are legitimate but that many large municipalities and transit organizations in Portland, Salem and Vancouver, Wash., continue to see the value of the alternative fuel.

As high as the price of conventional gas such as diesel has been lately, the price of biodiesel has been higher. That’s challenged SeQuential’s ability to retain customers.

“You are buying a more valuable product than the petroleum diesel you’re replacing,” Hill said. “We’re certainly working as hard as we can to bring down the cost of biodiesel, but we’re being impacted like everybody else by a weak dollar and a strong export market.”

Hill distinguished SeQuential’s biodiesel — which comes primarily from cooking-oil waste, he said — from biodiesel that comes from crops such as soybeans. The latter type has been blamed for massive deforestation and a rush to serve fuel demand at the expense of food supplies.

The district said buses running biodiesel lost about 2 percent in miles per gallon while encountering fuel-filter plugging problems.

But Hill said biodiesel is comparable to today’s diesel in energy, and that one-time clogging issues are normal because biodiesel is a solvent.

“We expect to see some fuel-system cleansing, which means there can be filter-clogging right up front,” he added. “We recommend changing fuel filters immediately (upon switching to biodiesel) and we don’t see that as a recurring issue.”

There continues to be debate about biodiesel emissions, as well.

Research suggests that biodiesel blends are better than diesel in releasing fewer harmful particulates and global-warming agents, but that the release of nitrous oxide is higher, said Kevin Downing, of the state Department of Environmental Quality.

The latter is a contributor to smog, which is less of a concern in Oregon than in areas such as Southern California, he added.

Copyright © 2008 — The Register-Guard, Eugene, Oregon, USA
http://registerguard.com/csp/cms/sit...09&sid=4&fid=1
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2226  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2008, 6:42 AM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 671
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxman View Post
My instincts say no, mainly because it seems as though they've invested too much in to it to pull the plug, but who knows? Other than regular diesel maybe they'll start using CNG, I've heard its much cheaper comparatively.
http://registerguard.com/csp/cms/sit...09&sid=4&fid=1
At this point, electrification of the bus system in certain corridors and areas may be another alternative. Catenary wires are eligible for federal New Starts funding and the Federal Transit Administration loves bus projects much more than rail... some people don't like all the overhead wires.. but i love them.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2227  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2008, 10:51 AM
deasine deasine is offline
Vancouver Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by RED_PDXer View Post
At this point, electrification of the bus system in certain corridors and areas may be another alternative. Catenary wires are eligible for federal New Starts funding and the Federal Transit Administration loves bus projects much more than rail... some people don't like all the overhead wires.. but i love them.
I'll take 'em over breathing smog and listening to loud buses
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2228  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2008, 12:02 AM
Bill_G Bill_G is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 5
They have been making test runs with the trains today. Interesting to listen to them on the radio.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2229  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2008, 5:34 PM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 671
To my knowledge, bikes will not be allowed in the aisles of the commuter trains because of strict Federal Railroad Administration rules, unlike regular public transit.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2230  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2008, 12:25 AM
bvpcvm bvpcvm is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Portland
Posts: 2,704
they couldn't open it in september because it conflicted with a mayoral conference? now THAT is a lame excuse.

http://www.oregonlive.com/printer/pr...740.xml&coll=7

Westside Express Service faces delay

Transit - TriMet says Colorado Railcar has problems with suppliers, affecting two diesel units

Tuesday, July 29, 2008 COREY PAUL
The Oregonian Staff

TriMet plans to delay the opening of the Westside Express Service until early November because of manufacturing setbacks on the final two Diesel Multiple Units, officials said Monday.

Colorado Railcar Manufacturing, LLC., is recapitalizing after trouble with supplies, said Mary Fetsch, TriMet communications director. The entire production process has slowed as a result.

Spokesmen from Colorado Railcar could not be reached for comment.

The express service will use 14.7 miles of existing freight tracks to provide a commuter service to Beaverton, Tigard, Tualatin and Wilsonville.

TriMet expects the last diesel trains to arrive in mid-September. Afterward, TriMet will test the railcars for about six weeks, Fetsch said.

"We are busy training new maintenance people, locomotive engineers," said Chris Novotny, community relations manager for the WES project. "Just making sure everything works before we open."

A first ride initially scheduled for Oct. 1 is planned for mid-October, Fetsch said. The delay won't mean any extra roadwork. Civil construction, including TriMet stations and signs, nears completion, which is expected by the end of the summer, Novotny said.

The first 85-ton DMU and a lookalike trailer arrived in June. TriMet conducted test runs on the DMU Friday and Saturday to make sure it runs safely and has enough clearance at stations, Fetsch said.

"It went great," Novotny said. "We had people in Beaverton waving at us. It was really, really fun."

Initially, TriMet shot for a September opening, but it conflicted with a mayoral conference.

Scheduling the opening is difficult because several elected officials are involved in the project, said Amy Miner, Beaverton public information manager.

"We're just looking forward to seeing WES up and running and hopefully reducing traffic in the area," Miner said.

Wilsonville Mayor Charlotte Leham said she didn't expect the delay to have much impact on her city.

"We've been waiting for this project since 1994, so I don't see that a few more weeks is going to matter," Leham said.

Corey Paul: 503-294-5960; coreypaul@news.oregonian.com
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2231  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2008, 10:35 PM
NJD's Avatar
NJD NJD is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 632
yadda, yadda...

Steel Bridge closure is a pain now, but wait
Posted by Corey Paul, The Oregonian August 03, 2008 18:51PM

Olivia Bucks / The Oregonian

Logan Winborn, 21, of Northwest Portland, uses the weekend to do his chores. But the closure of the Steel Bridge across the Willamette River meant an hourlong trip Sunday in search of new socks.

Instead of taking the westside Yellow Line toward Fred Meyer in Northeast Portland, the closure sent Winborn on a round-about journey: a Red Line train to the Old Town/Chinatown MAX station; a shuttle across the river to the Convention Center; a Yellow Line north to his destination, followed by a lengthy return.

Confusing? Yes, but worth a better transit system, Winborn said.

And this morning, one man in search of socks symbolizes the challenge of thousands who use the Steel Bridge to get to work.

The bridge was closed during the weekend as TriMet set new tracks that will connect existing rail lines with those of the new downtown MAX line. It will be closed through Aug. 24.

The bottom deck remains open to bikes and pedestrians.

TriMet will still shuttle riders across the river via other bridges. During the workweek, 29 buses will rotate through the Old Town/Chinatown and Convention Center/Rose Quarter stations.

TriMet has publicized the closure for weeks.

Officials hoped that traffic during the weekend -- with people such as Winborn -- would serve as a practice run for challenges of this workweek and beyond.

On Sunday, TriMet staged a parade of more than 30 people to emphasize alternatives to the shuttles. Friends, passers-by and entertainment walked, biked, roller-skated, even unicycled across the bottom deck of the bridge.

TriMet will plant workers at MAX stations to eliminate confusion for those taking the shuttles.

"It's going to be confusing this first day -- this first week really -- of these bus shuttles," said Peggy LaPoint, TriMet spokeswoman.

Though traffic was weekend-light, there was some grumbling at transfer stations Sunday -- the occasional expletive from passers-by or a frustrated shrug from drivers. But the few crowds that built up were quickly relieved by buses that arrive at the stations about every one to four minutes.

Many riders called the closure a minor and manageable inconvenience.

Perhaps the best indicator of how TriMet will handle rush-hour traffic today occurred after the Red Bull Flugtag on Saturday, when many of the roughly 80,000 attendees turned to TriMet for their exits.

Many times, that meant standing-room only, LaPoint said.

"We had maximum loads of people," LaPoint said. "We had people moving, and there wasn't a lot of waiting."

James Hill, 42, and his son traveled on buses to and from the event.

"It was a nuthouse," Hill said. "Like rush hour all day long."

But the buses arrived on time, Hill said.

About a half-dozen guides at the MAX stations Sunday advised riders of alternative routes and directed them to buses, hoping to smooth their adjustment.

For Steve Daily, 38, that adjustment means waking up about 20 minutes earlier than usual in order to drink his morning coffee and make it to work at Columbia Sportswear on time.

Normally, Daily would walk across the Burnside Bridge from his home in Southeast Portland to catch a Yellow Line over the Steel. Now, Daily will walk about twice that distance to the Convention Center Station.

But no worries. All that's definitely worth a beefier downtown transit system, Daily said.

"Three weeks isn't too bad to build over a bridge," Daily said. "It's just going to give me some more exercise."

-- Corey Paul; 503-294-5960; coreypaul@news.oregonian.com
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2232  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2008, 4:43 PM
alexjon's Avatar
alexjon alexjon is offline
Bears of antiquity
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Downtown/First Hill, Seattle, WA
Posts: 8,341
What a pointless news story...

"Trimet successfully handles bridge closure, people in Portland are supportive, Bob Pam-- I mean ROBERT PAMPLIN JUNIOR seethes somewhere."
__________________
"The United States is in no way founded upon the Christian religion." -- George Washington & John Adams in a diplomatic message to Malta
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2233  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2008, 7:56 PM
Pavlov's Dog Pavlov's Dog is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by RED_PDXer View Post
At this point, electrification of the bus system in certain corridors and areas may be another alternative. Catenary wires are eligible for federal New Starts funding and the Federal Transit Administration loves bus projects much more than rail... some people don't like all the overhead wires.. but i love them.
It seems like something of an unsightly and passé technology. I would think that it would be cheaper to put in fully charged fuel cells/batteries at set intervals would be a lot less expensive.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2234  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2008, 2:39 AM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 671
I kept trying to figure out why the title includes ".. but wait". But wait what? There's nothing in the story to suggest it's gonna get worse, like the title suggests. In fact, the story gives the impression that it's the exact opposite, that the weekend provided a trial run for TriMet to get their act together come commute time and even during this trial weekend, things went fairly smoothly.

It might've been the same day as this story that one of the O's covers read something to effect of "Steel Bridge closes to cars for MAX benefit". it was printed within a day of this story and seemed to suggest cars were the only transportation mode inconvenienced by this when in reality buses and cars have been prohibited from the bridge all summer and MAX riders have the most to pay from a required two-transfer penalty if crossing the river.

I wish the O would close down for three weeks instead of the Steel Bridge.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2235  
Old Posted Aug 6, 2008, 5:28 AM
bvpcvm bvpcvm is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Portland
Posts: 2,704
This is a couple days old, but, as usual, I got sucked into reading the comments after the article. I do have to wonder why it cost TriMet $600,000 to put up a fence. On the other hand, the geniuses who comment on these articles are all up in arms about the "half-assed" measures TriMet is taking. Of course, the thing is that they way Max is built, there's no way to close off these stations in anything other than a symbolic way - without spending hundreds of millions. Several commenters noted that "it works for BART" to have stations closed, but of course BART is an entirely different story. And naturally if we were to spend the millions it would take to close off these stations they'd be complaining about spending all that money. Ah, well...

http://www.portlandtribune.com/news/...63940318432800

TriMet targets MAX freeloaders

Gresham City Hall unimpressed with plan to renovate


By Mara Stine
The Gresham Outlook, Aug 1, 2008



JIM CLARK / Gresham Outlook

Stephanie Gabel, who rides MAX to work in Portland, said a proposed new fence at Central Station in Gresham won't make much of a difference and people will still find a way to avoid paying fares.

After years of complaints about crime and disorder on the local MAX line, TriMet now plans to fence off a particularly dangerous Gresham platform.
The Gresham Central transit center, at Northeast Eighth Avenue and Kelly Street, will become the MAX line’s first platform to be physically enclosed to reduce freeloaders from riding the rails.

But some local riders, police and even Gresham’s mayor say there are holes in TriMet’s plan. Not only would the fence contain ticket machines where people pay their fare, but the fence – at 42 inches high – is so short people could easily jump over it, said Gresham Mayor Shane Bemis.

“I’ve seen more protection at a kiddy pool,” he said. “I don’t know what they’re thinking. They need to go back to the drawing board.”

TriMet already has a handful of stations considered “fare zones” – areas where only those with a paid ticket are allowed. But there’s no fence to contain the zones, although a few are down flights of stairs from upper platforms where tickets are purchased, creating a delineation between the two areas. The 82nd Avenue platform is such a station.

Designs for Gresham Central changes, as well as improvements to the 82nd Avenue station, are about 75 percent done. Cost is estimated at $600,000.
Those designs call for a 42-inch-high fence to create a fare zone on the westbound side of Gresham Central. No such zone is needed on the eastbound side because there’s only one more station to the east, said Mary Fetsch, TriMet spokeswoman.

The zone also will be TriMet’s only one with ticket machines inside of it. Moving the station’s two ticket machines would cost an estimated $120,000, which is too expensive, Fetsch said. Two 8-foot gaps in the fence would allow riders to enter and exit the zone.

Bemis said the plan doesn’t make much sense.

“The whole idea was to make sure people had their ticket before getting on the platform,” he said. Besides, $600,000 is a lot of money for a fence that’s short enough for people to hop over, he added.

Fetsch pointed out that the $600,000 also pays for better lighting, signs directing riders to the fare zone and pavement treatments identifying the zone for both the 82nd and Gresham Central stations.

As for fence height, “We’re sending a clear message that this is a fare zone; at the same time, we didn’t want people to feel trapped by a taller fence if there was a situation that was making someone feel uncomfortable,” she said.

No full-time staff will be on hand to check fares, but more inspectors will frequent the zone, as will supervisors who now have authority to check fares and write tickets, Fetsch said.

“It’s still an honor system, it’s still an open system,” she said of the MAX line. “This isn’t going to become like a subway system, where you have turnstiles and staff there all hours all days.”

Also, starting in September, TriMet will replace 37 ticket machines dating back to when the light rail system was built 22 years ago. Six of those old machines are in Gresham, including one at Gresham Central. TriMet hopes this eliminates a common rider complaint that they couldn’t buy a ticket because the machine was broken, Fetsch said.

TriMet is scheduled to make the changes by the end of the year.
The changes are intended to help TriMet plug a revenue leak from people riding for free. About 8 percent of MAX riders don’t pay, “which is about the industry standard,” Fetsch said.

Based on that statistic and the $32 million that TriMet made in light-rail ticket sales during the last fiscal year, TriMet lost approximately $2.56 million in ticket revenue due to freeloaders.

TriMet’s proposed changes also could improve safety. Last spring at a local community safety summit, Gresham citizens told Bemis they didn’t feel safe on the train or at stations, particularly at night. Bemis and citizens suggested that TriMet enclose stations to keep out fare-evaders and criminals.

Then in late October, just as Bemis assigned two Gresham police officers to patrol the train, a 15-year-old boy armed with a baseball bat brutally beat an elderly man at Gresham Central, nearly killing him.

Gresham Capt. Tim Gerkman doubts the fare zone will reduce freeloaders. The Gresham City Hall and Cleveland Avenue stations are within walking distance, he said. “So if you’re not law abiding, wouldn’t you just walk the extra four or five blocks?” he asked. “People who are intent on being disruptive, loud, rowdy and obnoxious are not going to pay their fare.”

Rider reaction to the plan is mixed.

“I think it’s a good idea because … it would erase a lot of the people who come here just to hang out and cause trouble,” said Sandy resident Gabriela Novak, 25, as she waited for a westbound train.

“I’ve got two kids,” ages 1 and 3, she said. “I don’t want them around that kind of thing.”

Stephanie Gabel, 39, of Gresham is less optimistic.

“I don’t think it’s going to stop people from not paying,” she said while headed to work at a bank near Portland’s Hollywood station. In fact, the Hollywood station has a downstairs fare zone, and she still sees people getting on the train without buying a ticket. “It doesn’t stop anybody,” she said.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2236  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2008, 5:05 AM
NJD's Avatar
NJD NJD is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 632
Thumbs up


Jackson South Terminus will generate renewable power


POSTED: 01:21 PM PDT Monday, August 11, 2008
BY SAM BENNETT The DJC


Work begins this fall on Tri-Met's Jackson South Terminus. The terminus, for the Portland Mall light rail project, will be at Fifth Avenue and Jackson Street and incorporate green features that aren't often associated with transit projects.

The full block development will have an array of solar panels that will produce 50 kilowatts, as well as wind turbines. The turbines, made by Oregon Wind, will be portable "urban turbines" mounted on light rail's catenary poles, adding 275 watts of power.

David Byrne, a designer with Hennebery Eddy Architects, said the project will also have an advanced stormwater retention system. Tri-Met is billing the block as an "educational space," which should be completed by year's end.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2237  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2008, 1:59 AM
NJD's Avatar
NJD NJD is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland
Posts: 632
Metro wants to hear from you right now on where mass future transit should go:
http://www.metro-goingplaces.org/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2238  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2008, 2:11 AM
Sekkle's Avatar
Sekkle Sekkle is offline
zzzzzzzz
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland area
Posts: 2,265
^ I filled that survey out earlier today. I thought it could have been done a lot better. They didn't list downtown Portland or the airport as "major activity centers." Maybe because there's already MAX service there, but they did list downtown Hillsboro, Beaverton and Gresham. Anyway, I listed Kruse Way as an area they forgot... mainly because I work there, but also it seems to be a huge employment area that is incredibly underserved transit-wise.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2239  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2008, 5:29 PM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 671
I suggested that they work more at integrating the multimodal connection of regional transit with safe bike access and parking, so that people can safely store and ride bikes from each end of their MAX trips.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2240  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2008, 5:55 PM
alexjon's Avatar
alexjon alexjon is offline
Bears of antiquity
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Downtown/First Hill, Seattle, WA
Posts: 8,341
I find it hard to argue with their map when deciding where else they should go aside from Streetcar Sam's proposals. What I want, however, is Metro to urge Trimet to bring back 60' artics and consider creating express versions of the 10-series of buses (12, 14, 15) until those corridors can be served by streetcars. Drop an express stop at SE 16th, SE 39th, SE 50th, Division, Foster + 67th, and SE 82nd for the 14, for example.

Oh, I should reply to them, huh?

Can they boss Trimet around like that, I wonder?
__________________
"The United States is in no way founded upon the Christian religion." -- George Washington & John Adams in a diplomatic message to Malta
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Portland > Transportation & Infrastructure
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 6:08 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.