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  #101  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2017, 3:29 PM
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Originally Posted by kool maudit View Post
Strangely, Copenhagen and Stockholm are almost becoming this way with English, although for very different reasons than Montreal. It's about as easy to function as a unilingual anglophone* in CPH as is MTL, with a few different points of emphasis (government stuff is Danish only, but there is no historical angst over the code-shifting, for example).

*Det gør jeg selvfølgelig ikke, jeg kan taler Dansk... et Français aussi
Amsterdam too, as I mentioned above.
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  #102  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2017, 10:21 PM
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Measures like the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Project appear to be working. There have been more citizenship ceremonies than usual here. I'm curious to see if the momentum from the past 3-4 years keeps up.





We also seem to be doing a lot more outreach in continental Europe, whereas in the past we've mainly participated in immigration fairs in Ireland and the United Kingdom.

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  #103  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2017, 11:38 PM
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Another release of data tomorrow for labor and education.
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  #104  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:46 AM
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Commute to work, transit, 2016, municipalities with population 100,000+
Code:
Prov.	City		Total	Transit	Transit%
QC	Montréal	756850	276625	36.5
ON	Toronto		1251055	453005	36.2
BC	Vancouver	315325	93675	29.7
BC	Burnaby		108300	31865	29.4
QC	Longueuil	111405	25565	22.9
BC	Richmond	86260	16455	19.1
ON	Ottawa		439850	80690	18.3
ON	Mississauga	336120	60750	18.1
BC	Coquitlam	64415	11540	17.9
QC	Laval		195685	34825	17.8
ON	Ajax		57905	9865	17.0
ON	Oakville	87110	14625	16.8
QC	Gatineau	133050	21840	16.4
ON	Markham		144565	23520	16.3
AB	Calgary		611370	96575	15.8
ON	Richmond Hill	86615	13180	15.2
MB	Winnipeg	342225	51050	14.9
BC	Surrey		238945	35560	14.9
AB	Edmonton	466230	67990	14.6
QC	Québec		258250	37375	14.5
ON	Brampton	278880	38925	14.0
ON	Vaughan		146660	18690	12.7
ON	Whitby		60045	7490	12.5
BC	Saanich		51790	6165	11.9
NS	Halifax		194735	22975	11.8
BC	Delta		47195	5420	11.5
ON	Hamilton	242295	25540	10.5
ON	Oshawa		69530	6780	9.8
ON	London		171790	15825	9.2
ON	Burlington	87310	7940	9.1
ON	Kingston	54965	4565	8.3
ON	Milton		51905	4260	8.2
ON	Waterloo	48835	3705	7.6
ON	Kitchener	114230	8370	7.3
ON	Guelph		66335	4695	7.1
QC	Terrebonne	55600	3685	6.6
QC	Lévis		72745	4085	5.6
SK	Regina		109235	6010	5.5
ON	Barrie		68290	3665	5.4
QC	Sherbrooke	71285	3815	5.4
NL	St. John's	50565	2635	5.2
ON	Windsor		85260	4375	5.1
SK	Saskatoon	122305	6225	5.1
ON	Greater Sudbury	73430	3630	4.9
ON	Cambridge	63975	3035	4.7
AB	Red Deer	49500	2230	4.5
ON	Thunder Bay	48425	2110	4.4
BC	Kelowna		58470	2520	4.3
ON	St. Catharines	57615	2450	4.3
BC	Langley (D)	54775	2230	4.1
QC	Trois-Rivières	56975	1470	2.6
QC	Saguenay	62785	1465	2.3
BC	Abbotsford	63190	1430	2.3
ON	Chatham-Kent	42445	440	1.0
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  #105  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 3:51 AM
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Interesting. By that measure, Burnaby is the country's most "urban" suburb. Pretty much identical to Vancouver proper.
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  #106  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 4:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doady View Post
Commute to work, transit, 2016, municipalities with population 100,000+
Code:
Prov.	City		Total	Transit	Transit%
QC	Montréal	756850	276625	36.5
ON	Toronto		1251055	453005	36.2
BC	Vancouver	315325	93675	29.7
BC	Burnaby		108300	31865	29.4
QC	Longueuil	111405	25565	22.9
BC	Richmond	86260	16455	19.1
ON	Ottawa		439850	80690	18.3
ON	Mississauga	336120	60750	18.1
BC	Coquitlam	64415	11540	17.9
QC	Laval		195685	34825	17.8
ON	Ajax		57905	9865	17.0
ON	Oakville	87110	14625	16.8
QC	Gatineau	133050	21840	16.4
ON	Markham		144565	23520	16.3
AB	Calgary		611370	96575	15.8
ON	Richmond Hill	86615	13180	15.2
MB	Winnipeg	342225	51050	14.9
BC	Surrey		238945	35560	14.9
AB	Edmonton	466230	67990	14.6
QC	Québec		258250	37375	14.5
ON	Brampton	278880	38925	14.0
ON	Vaughan		146660	18690	12.7
ON	Whitby		60045	7490	12.5
BC	Saanich		51790	6165	11.9
NS	Halifax		194735	22975	11.8
BC	Delta		47195	5420	11.5
ON	Hamilton	242295	25540	10.5
ON	Oshawa		69530	6780	9.8
ON	London		171790	15825	9.2
ON	Burlington	87310	7940	9.1
ON	Kingston	54965	4565	8.3
ON	Milton		51905	4260	8.2
ON	Waterloo	48835	3705	7.6
ON	Kitchener	114230	8370	7.3
ON	Guelph		66335	4695	7.1
QC	Terrebonne	55600	3685	6.6
QC	Lévis		72745	4085	5.6
SK	Regina		109235	6010	5.5
ON	Barrie		68290	3665	5.4
QC	Sherbrooke	71285	3815	5.4
NL	St. John's	50565	2635	5.2
ON	Windsor		85260	4375	5.1
SK	Saskatoon	122305	6225	5.1
ON	Greater Sudbury	73430	3630	4.9
ON	Cambridge	63975	3035	4.7
AB	Red Deer	49500	2230	4.5
ON	Thunder Bay	48425	2110	4.4
BC	Kelowna		58470	2520	4.3
ON	St. Catharines	57615	2450	4.3
BC	Langley (D)	54775	2230	4.1
QC	Trois-Rivières	56975	1470	2.6
QC	Saguenay	62785	1465	2.3
BC	Abbotsford	63190	1430	2.3
ON	Chatham-Kent	42445	440	1.0
Surprised that Ottawa isn't higher and that Gatineau is that close to Ottawa. Would have thought Ottawa was around 28% and Gatineau maybe around 20%.

Quebec City is also higher than I thought it would be.
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  #107  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 5:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Surprised that Ottawa isn't higher and that Gatineau is that close to Ottawa. Would have thought Ottawa was around 28% and Gatineau maybe around 20%.

Quebec City is also higher than I thought it would be.
You thought Quebec City would be lower than 14.5%?

I find that this is a very low number for a city this size. But unfortunately, outside of the Haute-ville, Limoilou, St-Sauveur and St-Roch, the city is a sprawling mess... It's hard to optimize and promote public transit in a city with so many highways and so few dense areas. They have some reserved bus lanes, but they are not in "site propre" (exclusive? as in Ottawa's transitway), so buses often get stuck in traffic whenever there is construction or someone decides to park on the bus lane. Mayor Labeaume does have some ambitions for a "structuring transit project", but these plans are still quite vague and mysterious. More to come I guess...
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Last edited by begratto; Dec 1, 2017 at 7:27 PM.
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  #108  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 7:24 PM
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For "very low" transit mode shares, look at US cities. Quebec is comparable to Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary.

Suburbs will have high transit use because walking and biking to work is not an option. Some suburbs are older or close to downtown, like Burnaby and New Westminster (31.4% transit mode share), and so are more comparable to places like Etobicoke and North York, which have amalgamated into the central city. Sometimes suburbs can be deamalgamated from the central city, like Kirkland and Hampstead from Montreal, pushing that city's mode share above Toronto. Or the central city can include many outer suburbs and surrouding farmland like Ottawa and London. Please keep these things in mind when comparing.

I could post list for CMAs but Stats Canada will do that anyways so pointless for me to do it.

Commute to work, active transportation, 2016, municipalities with population 100,000+
Code:
Prov.	City		Total	Bike	Walk	Active%
BC	Vancouver	315325	19355	43155	19.8
BC	Saanich		51790	3250	3250	12.6
QC	Montréal	756850	29415	65000	12.5
ON	Kingston	54965	1330	5110	11.7
ON	Toronto		1251055	34355	107655	11.4
ON	Ottawa		439850	11465	32450	10.0
QC	Québec		258250	4370	20335	9.6
BC	Kelowna		58470	2135	3325	9.3
NS	Halifax		194735	1965	15925	9.2
ON	Waterloo	48835	1000	3095	8.4
NL	St. John's	50565	165	3665	7.6
ON	Guelph		66335	1080	3890	7.5
ON	London		171790	2115	10230	7.2
SK	Saskatoon	122305	2735	5560	6.8
MB	Winnipeg	342225	6200	16675	6.7
QC	Gatineau	133050	3135	5685	6.6
AB	Calgary		611370	9870	30265	6.6
QC	Sherbrooke	71285	560	4075	6.5
ON	St. Catharines	57615	570	2955	6.1
ON	Thunder Bay	48425	630	2225	5.9
ON	Chatham-Kent	42445	370	2090	5.8
BC	Richmond	86260	1150	3745	5.7
BC	Burnaby		108300	1230	4855	5.6
ON	Windsor		85260	1160	3620	5.6
ON	Hamilton	242295	2245	11210	5.6
QC	Trois-Rivières	56975	485	2625	5.5
SK	Regina		109235	1275	4585	5.4
QC	Longueuil	111405	1680	4240	5.3
ON	Kitchener	114230	1185	4855	5.3
AB	Edmonton	466230	5575	19025	5.3
ON	Greater Sudbury	73430	315	3315	4.9
AB	Red Deer	49500	465	1935	4.8
ON	Barrie		68290	365	2900	4.8
QC	Lévis		72745	505	2750	4.5
QC	Saguenay	62785	205	2555	4.4
ON	Oshawa		69530	230	2760	4.3
BC	Coquitlam	64415	385	2360	4.3
BC	Delta		47195	370	1595	4.2
ON	Burlington	87310	690	2890	4.1
BC	Abbotsford	63190	405	2135	4.0
ON	Oakville	87110	555	2895	4.0
BC	Langley (D)	54775	355	1615	3.6
ON	Cambridge	63975	410	1880	3.6
BC	Surrey		238945	915	6615	3.2
ON	Mississauga	336120	1140	8875	3.0
ON	Whitby		60045	175	1575	2.9
ON	Ajax		57905	275	1355	2.8
QC	Laval		195685	1040	4415	2.8
ON	Richmond Hill	86615	235	2120	2.7
ON	Milton		51905	200	1145	2.6
QC	Terrebonne	55600	230	1180	2.5
ON	Markham		144565	465	3060	2.4
ON	Vaughan		146660	325	2645	2.0
ON	Brampton	278880	725	4585	1.9
Commute to work, sustainable transportation, 2016, municipalities with population 100,000+
Code:
Prov.	City		Total	Transit	Bike	Walk	Sustainable%
BC	Vancouver	315325	93675	19355	43155	49.5
QC	Montréal	756850	276625	29415	65000	49.0
ON	Toronto		1251055	453005	34355	107655	47.6
BC	Burnaby		108300	31865	1230	4855	35.0
ON	Ottawa		439850	80690	11465	32450	28.3
QC	Longueuil	111405	25565	1680	4240	28.3
BC	Richmond	86260	16455	1150	3745	24.8
BC	Saanich		51790	6165	3250	3250	24.5
QC	Québec		258250	37375	4370	20335	24.0
QC	Gatineau	133050	21840	3135	5685	23.0
AB	Calgary		611370	96575	9870	30265	22.4
BC	Coquitlam	64415	11540	385	2360	22.2
MB	Winnipeg	342225	51050	6200	16675	21.6
ON	Mississauga	336120	60750	1140	8875	21.1
NS	Halifax		194735	22975	1965	15925	21.0
ON	Oakville	87110	14625	555	2895	20.7
QC	Laval		195685	34825	1040	4415	20.6
ON	Kingston	54965	4565	1330	5110	20.0
AB	Edmonton	466230	67990	5575	19025	19.9
ON	Ajax		57905	9865	275	1355	19.9
ON	Markham		144565	23520	465	3060	18.7
BC	Surrey		238945	35560	915	6615	18.0
ON	Richmond Hill	86615	13180	235	2120	17.9
ON	London		171790	15825	2115	10230	16.4
ON	Hamilton	242295	25540	2245	11210	16.1
ON	Waterloo	48835	3705	1000	3095	16.0
ON	Brampton	278880	38925	725	4585	15.9
BC	Delta		47195	5420	370	1595	15.6
ON	Whitby		60045	7490	175	1575	15.4
ON	Vaughan		146660	18690	325	2645	14.8
ON	Guelph		66335	4695	1080	3890	14.6
ON	Oshawa		69530	6780	230	2760	14.1
BC	Kelowna		58470	2520	2135	3325	13.6
ON	Burlington	87310	7940	690	2890	13.2
NL	St. John's	50565	2635	165	3665	12.8
ON	Kitchener	114230	8370	1185	4855	12.6
SK	Saskatoon	122305	6225	2735	5560	11.9
QC	Sherbrooke	71285	3815	560	4075	11.9
SK	Regina		109235	6010	1275	4585	10.9
ON	Milton		51905	4260	200	1145	10.8
ON	Windsor		85260	4375	1160	3620	10.7
ON	St. Catharines	57615	2450	570	2955	10.4
ON	Thunder Bay	48425	2110	630	2225	10.3
ON	Barrie		68290	3665	365	2900	10.1
QC	Lévis		72745	4085	505	2750	10.1
ON	Greater Sudbury	73430	3630	315	3315	9.9
AB	Red Deer	49500	2230	465	1935	9.4
QC	Terrebonne	55600	3685	230	1180	9.2
ON	Cambridge	63975	3035	410	1880	8.3
QC	Trois-Rivières	56975	1470	485	2625	8.0
BC	Langley (D)	54775	2230	355	1615	7.7
ON	Chatham-Kent	42445	440	370	2090	6.8
QC	Saguenay	62785	1465	205	2555	6.7
BC	Abbotsford	63190	1430	405	2135	6.3
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  #109  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 7:43 PM
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Originally Posted by begratto View Post
You thought Quebec City would be lower than 14.5%?

I find that this is a very low number for a city this size. But unfortunately, outside of the Haute-ville, Limoilou, St-Sauveur and St-Roch, the city is a sprawling mess... It's hard to optimize and promote public transit in a city with so many highways and so few dense areas. They have some reserved bus lanes, but they are not in "site propre" (exclusive? as in Ottawa's transitway), so buses often get stuck in traffic whenever there is construction or someone decides to park on the bus lane. Mayor Labeaume does have some ambitions for a "structuring transit project", but these plans are still quite vague and mysterious. More to come I guess...
Yes, I know it's low for a city of its size but I still thought it would be lower given how most of the city and metro is so incredibly sprawly and low density. And how sub-par the transit system is - with no concrete improvements in sight (if we are being honest).
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  #110  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2017, 7:45 PM
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For "very low" transit mode shares, look at US cities. Quebec is comparable to Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary.

]
Again that is one of the reasons I find Quebec City is "high", when you consider Calgary and Edmonton have LRT...
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  #111  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2017, 5:50 PM
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Being of Jewish background myself, I'm not sure if I want Statscan to address this "problem":

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...ick=sf_globefb
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  #112  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2017, 7:25 PM
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Being of Jewish background myself, I'm not sure if I want Statscan to address this "problem":

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news...ick=sf_globefb
From the article,

"As the Jewish community in general becomes more and more 'Canadian,' in the sense that we are now more likely to be third– or fourth-generation Canadian, then we may conceive our ancestors as simply Canadian over time," Ms. Luffman wrote."

Reminds me of a survey I was recently reading about for Latino/Hispanics in the US, claiming that similarly, third and later generation Americans of Hispanic heritage as less likely to identify as such.

Of course, that kind of thing doesn't happen within the span of a census period but it does make me wonder to what extent the "members of ethnic group X no longer identify with the label X after the second, third, fourth generation etc." is a real and general phenomenon and if so, does it operate any differently in Canada than the US.

https://www.npr.org/2017/12/20/57199...en-study-finds
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  #113  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 2:52 AM
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Since Jewish is no longer given as an example, many may think the question means what country did your grandparents or great-grandparents immigrate from? Hence the surge in Polish origin responses in Jewish areas.
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  #114  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 2:52 AM
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BTW, Irving Abella, the historian of Canadian Jewry quoted in the article, is the husband of Justice Rosalie Abella. Looks like they were one of the households given the long form.
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  #115  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 3:54 AM
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Measures like the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Project appear to be working. There have been more citizenship ceremonies than usual here. I'm curious to see if the momentum from the past 3-4 years keeps up.





We also seem to be doing a lot more outreach in continental Europe, whereas in the past we've mainly participated in immigration fairs in Ireland and the United Kingdom.

Is there any way to ensure they stay in NL? On the west coast a big part of our issues is the giant QC loophole where "investor immigrants" claim they're moving to Quebec and end up here.
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  #116  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 4:10 AM
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Is there any way to ensure they stay in NL? On the west coast a big part of our issues is the giant QC loophole where "investor immigrants" claim they're moving to Quebec and end up here.
Retention rates in Atlantic Canada are somewhat low but not terrible, and they have been rising. Around 70% of family class immigrants from the 2010 cohort to Atlantic Canada were still in the same province 5 years later for example, compared to around 90% in the rest of Canada. The numbers by province so I think if a family immigrated to PEI then moved to Moncton 4 years later that counted against the retention rate. PEI had a really low retention rate for economic class immigrants, 14%, but maybe that's just not a good program for a small rural province.

This year around 19,000 immigrants are expected in Atlantic Canada.
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  #117  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 4:21 AM
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Is there any way to ensure they stay in NL?
Allow provinces to have more control over immigration, Quebec-style?

Or since family class immigrants more commonly stay in the same area they'd settled versus economic settlement, promote more family class immigration?

Promote a bloc settlement style of settlement?
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  #118  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 4:25 AM
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Bloc settlement seems old fashioned and so last century, but I'd bet it could work in theory, if you somehow got or coordinated a group of close-knit families willing to emigrate at the same time, to avoid the "individual immigrant, feels out of place without similar people around, and heads soon afterward to the biggest city where members of his/her ethnic community live" problem.

However, then again, I don't know how the locals will react to the arrival of such a block of newcomers.
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  #119  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2018, 3:21 PM
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Bloc settlement seems old fashioned and so last century, but I'd bet it could work in theory, if you somehow got or coordinated a group of close-knit families willing to emigrate at the same time, to avoid the "individual immigrant, feels out of place without similar people around, and heads soon afterward to the biggest city where members of his/her ethnic community live" problem.

However, then again, I don't know how the locals will react to the arrival of such a block of newcomers.
I don't see how this option could be much of a competitive advantage for the outlying regions of Canada.

At this point pretty much any ethnicity in the world has a decent-sized community of its own "kind" at least somewhere in Canada. Yes, these are always in large cities where they will rub shoulders with people of other origins but you'd have that contact in smaller less populated regions too. Since I don't suppose we're talking about setting up an isolated Rohingya colony in a previously unpopulated part of New Brunswick or Newfoundland.

Another thing is that "living among one's own" is not necessarily unanimously seen as a plus among all immigrants.

In my experience immigrants are pretty evenly divided between those who want to be among their "kind" and keep the old ways, and those who want to start anew. There is obviously a huge amount of grey in between those two views and variation depending on ethnicities and religions, but I don't think that it's accurate to assume that giving people the opportunity to replicate a Yerevan or Quezon City on Canadian soil is going to be automatically appealling to everyone.
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Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 1:25 PM
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St. John's Canada's most open city, populism poll suggests

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At a time in world history marked by a global trend towards slamming doors on immigration in the face of mounting economic insecurity, new polling by The Canadian Press/Ekos Politics suggests St. John's is Canada's most "open" city, where populist politics — including support for restrictions on newcomers and resistance to free trade and globalization — are least likely to thrive.

Populism is the term often used to describe the bursts of anti-elite support that catapulted outsider Donald Trump into the White House and fuelled Britain's stunning referendum results to leave the European Union.

...

The city of about 109,000 people, its famous colourful clapboard buildings nestled around a busy harbour, is increasingly diverse but still overwhelmingly white. And its economic engine has sputtered since the offshore oil bonanza that built luxury homes and opened swank restaurants ended when prices crashed three years ago.

That, according to conventional wisdom, is supposed to make it fertile ground for the sort of attitudes believed to underpin the 21st-century populist forces that are in play around the world.

And yet St. John's — along with Victoria, B.C., another fairly white seaside destination — tops the ranks of Canada's most open cities, Graves said. At the other end of the spectrum, the surveys suggest, are Oshawa, Ont., and Calgary, where "closed" attitudes and tepid support for immigration are spurred by a persistent and deepening fear of a worsening economy.

"Maybe it's the ocean having kind of a more cosmopolitan influence on the outlook of people," Graves said. "A lot of people come through. It's a big port.

"We see both people in British Columbia and the Atlantic tend to be more open. It's peculiar."

James Baker grew up in Carbonear, about an hour northwest of St. John's, and now helps immigrants adjust in the capital city as part of his job with the Association for New Canadians.

Those stories about big-hearted Newfoundlanders now immortalized in the hit Broadway play "Come From Away" aren't just oversweetened stereotypes, Baker said.

"Even in hard times, they recognize the challenges and wants of others and want to make sure they don't go without. They put others before themselves."

Arrivals of Syrian refugees two years ago put that generosity on moving display, he added.

"There's just a tremendous number of folks who want to help support refugees, newcomers as they settle into our province. We had a little boy who brought his birthday money to donate. I think he was 10."

The province, like other parts of the country and Atlantic Canada in particular, is an aging population desperate to attract and retain new residents. Immigration to Newfoundland and Labrador is up 40 per cent since 2012 and the governing Liberals want to raise it another 50 per cent to 1,700 newcomers a year by 2022.
http://www.thetelegram.com/news/regi...ggests-181655/
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