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  #17861  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:21 AM
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Knight Hospitaller Knight Hospitaller is online now
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^ As the field purportedly narrows, Chicago nabbing this is my concern. Amazon wouldn’t be the first Seattle company to go there. It has a lot to offer. Austin only has the trendy vibe and tech sector. That said, I think we are still in the drivers seat.
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  #17862  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:18 AM
acenturi acenturi is offline
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Originally Posted by iheartphilly View Post
Chicago is definitely the wildcard. Most favored an east coast location. But, I can see one big advantage from Chicago over Philly and that is direct flights to the Far East.

Amazon, let's go with the announcement. All of us aren't getting any younger.
I doubt that an airline flight to the Far East will be a requirement for selection. Amazon's most extensive non-North American presence is Europe, which dwarfs Asia. If Amazon's final negotiations (with the hypothetical 3) required a Far East airline flight, Philly, already a significant American Airlines international Gateway, could offer revenue guarantees for service to either China or Japan. I believe, however, the only RFP requirement is air access to Seattle, which we easily satisfy with several daily flights. I'd bet AA would jump on a partially subsidized PHL flight to Japan or China (Amazon's largest centers in that region) and route connections to support it.
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  #17863  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:29 AM
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The easiest solution to that dilemma would be to locate any jobs pertaining to Asian markets in Seattle instead of Philly, and put the Europe-focused jobs here. Hypothetically, of course, but that would seem to make sense if Amazon chooses philly or another location along the coast.
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  #17864  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 4:08 AM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Originally Posted by acenturi View Post
I doubt that an airline flight to the Far East will be a requirement for selection. Amazon's most extensive non-North American presence is Europe, which dwarfs Asia. If Amazon's final negotiations (with the hypothetical 3) required a Far East airline flight, Philly, already a significant American Airlines international Gateway, could offer revenue guarantees for service to either China or Japan. I believe, however, the only RFP requirement is air access to Seattle, which we easily satisfy with several daily flights. I'd bet AA would jump on a partially subsidized PHL flight to Japan or China (Amazon's largest centers in that region) and route connections to support it.
If Amazon comes, the Asian flights will follow quickly.

It's not like the airport can't handle them. It can.

And it already has a Centurion Lounge for elites, so....

Not many airports do. Certainly not Austin.
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  #17865  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 5:11 AM
acenturi acenturi is offline
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Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown View Post
If Amazon comes, the Asian flights will follow quickly.
And it already has a Centurion Lounge for elites, so....
Not many airports do. Certainly not Austin.
"If Amazon comes, the Asian flights will follow quickly." - Why ? There will likely be little or no directly related Amazon business travel to the Far East from PHL, it'll be from Seattle.
"It's not like the airport can't handle them. It can. -" Who on earth said it can't ??
"And it already has a Centurion Lounge for elites, so..Not many airports do. Certainly not Austin" The American Express Centurion Lounge has nothing to do with Airline "elites". All you need is a Platinum AMEX Card. AMEX selects airports for Centurion Lounges based on the number of card holders in the airport catchment.

Last edited by acenturi; Jun 14, 2018 at 5:58 AM.
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  #17866  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 12:32 PM
iamrobk iamrobk is offline
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Originally Posted by MyDadBuiltThat View Post
So far your info doesn't contradict with what I heard so that keeps me hopeful. I know its just hearsay but I heard that the Cushman and Wakefield rep who was pitching their center city option to Amazon was told that it was always just Philadelphia, Austin or Chicago.
Honestly I'd be shocked if that was true, but that's mostly based on my gut instinct that it was going to be an east coast city (i.e. not Austin or Chicago). But it also doesn't match up with the little other information I know, although that isn't really hard facts (I can't say any more unfortunately).

And while this doesn't discount your information, I think Amazon typically works with CBRE, not Cushman and Wakefield, so this person may be a little further removed from the decision making than they let on. (That said, commercial real estate is well outside my area of expertise so maybe it's common in that field to regularly work with different companies.)
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  #17867  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:54 PM
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Chris Brennan
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Philadelphia's proposed new construction tax on hold till next week for amendment to clarify that it would not apply to potential #AmazonHQ2 sites, per City Council President @Darrell_Clarke

https://twitter.com/ByChrisBrennan/s...57403430260736

I wouldn't read anything into this regarding our chances for HQ2, but it's clear Commerce and City Council had some discussions behind the scenes lol.
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  #17868  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:34 PM
mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
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I love the fact that Amazon could be coming here, and I think we should do all we can to ensure that they do.
However, this is just unfair. If you have to give out exceptions to the rule, it's a bad rule.
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  #17869  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 4:04 PM
Londonee Londonee is offline
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I think it's amazing how tight-lipped everyone is being about this whole process. Presumably, at this point, thousands of people are in the know across dozens of entities mobilizing behind the scenes (including family and friends of those in the know). And nary a peep. This isn't exactly national security secrets here - everyone should live a little and leak!
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  #17870  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 4:10 PM
iheartphilly iheartphilly is offline
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^
Amazon is sure having fun at our expense. In actuality, I think non-disclosure agreements that can cost you your job if you leak info before it is official is in effect. This is no different than company secrets or proprietary info that key employees must not disclose.
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  #17871  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 5:43 PM
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If Amazon does not like taxes, they won’t like Philadelphia!
Correct me if I’m mistaken, but doesn’t Philadelphia charge a soda tax?
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  #17872  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 6:13 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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Speaking of bad rules, here's another.

Philadelphia could become the next city to pass a scheduling law for retail and fast-food companies

Now, these aren't major, high paying jobs that are at stake. But I can see a high end retailer thinking about opening in the region deciding between KOP and Walnut Street choosing KOP.

But the real issue here is the message being sent to the business community. That's the real problem. At the very least, it further cements our image as a city that's not an easy place to start or do business. The city needs to eliminate these laws, not keep passing them. Helen Gym is an idiot. Maybe one day there will be ONE voice on city council that speaks for the business community.
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  #17873  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 6:52 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Originally Posted by TechTalkGuy View Post
If Amazon does not like taxes, they won’t like Philadelphia!
Correct me if I’m mistaken, but doesn’t Philadelphia charge a soda tax?
You think Amazon cares about a soda tax?

Good lord.
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  #17874  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 7:11 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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It's not about Amazon. They're getting a ton of tax breaks. It's about the dudes just starting a business and thinking about where to locate (city or burbs); or the medium sized company from outside the city considering relocating but not big enough to be wooed by anyone; or the Philadelphia company or family that is maxed out with taxes.
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  #17875  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 7:18 PM
Londonee Londonee is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
It's not about Amazon. They're getting a ton of tax breaks. It's about the dudes just starting a business and thinking about where to locate (city or burbs); or the medium sized company from outside the city considering relocating but not big enough to be wooed by anyone; or the Philadelphia company or family that is maxed out with taxes.
You have a similar refrain on here, but I think it often lacks common sense. If I need to start a business and want it to be in the city b/c of creative talent and amenities, a law that ensures better working conditions for retail folks and fast food employees is just, simply, not going to weigh in on the decision. I understand your notion of the preponderance of burdens but it's not zero sum. Some regulations help poor people, which is something we need more of in poverty-stricken Philly.
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  #17876  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 7:23 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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Again, it's about the image. Does such a law change the city's anti-business climate or further cement it? That's what I'm saying. Of course, I understand that tech companies and major corporations would never have to worry about paying this tax. But companies won't even consider Philly as long as it has this anti-business image.
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  #17877  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 7:46 PM
Boku Boku is offline
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Originally Posted by iamrobk View Post
Chris Brennan
@ByChrisBrennan
Philadelphia's proposed new construction tax on hold till next week for amendment to clarify that it would not apply to potential #AmazonHQ2 sites, per City Council President @Darrell_Clarke

https://twitter.com/ByChrisBrennan/s...57403430260736

I wouldn't read anything into this regarding our chances for HQ2, but it's clear Commerce and City Council had some discussions behind the scenes lol.
If Amazon picks Philly, it won't have to pay construction tax to fund affordable housing

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/am...-20180614.html
Quote:
If Amazon decides to build its second headquarters in Philadelphia, it would not have to pay a proposed construction tax created to fund affordable housing.

City Council wants to make that explicitly clear.

Council today added an exemption for all Keystone Opportunity Zones from the proposed 1 percent tax on new construction. The three sites Philadelphia pitched Amazon, at the Schuylkill Yards and uCity Square sites in West Philadelphia and South Philadelphia’s Navy Yard, are in Keystone Opportunity Zones.

Those zones, designated by the state and typically vacant land in under-developed areas, already are exempt from most local and state taxes.
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  #17878  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 8:02 PM
DMPHL DMPHL is offline
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Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown View Post

It's not like the airport can't handle them. It can.
Ehhh...depends on when those flights would depart and arrive. Arrive and depart in the middle of the prime afternoon TATL banks...they'd be hard pressed to find gate space.
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  #17879  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 8:20 PM
iheartphilly iheartphilly is offline
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Philadelphia could become the next city to pass a scheduling law for retail and fast-food companies
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/fa...-20180614.html

Sheesh, the arguments are stretched all over the place in this article.

"Representatives from retail and food service associations, such as David French, senior vice president for government relations of the National Retail Federation, say laws like this don’t reflect the fact that people choose these industries because of their flexibility."

"That doesn’t square with the experience of Tori Price, who used to work at the Target at 12th and Chestnut to help support her mother and siblings. “There’s no way to support a family of seven or do any financial planning when my hours range constantly from 20 to 35 hours per week,” the 19-year-old West Philadelphian said in written testimony at the March hearing. She was called in to work that day so couldn’t attend the hearing in person. “We have an eviction notice on our house, but I don’t even know what rent I can afford, so how can I look for a new apartment?”"

"Melissa Bova, vice president of government affairs for the Pennsylvania Restaurant and Lodging Association, said that a scheduling law would hurt a company’s bottom line."

"Gym said the law would be good for business, too, pointing to research that showed that more consistent scheduling led to higher productivity and sales."

No one is gonna to really say why retail and fast-food chains don't want it. I feel like everyone is out of touch about this.
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  #17880  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 9:47 PM
sayitaintso sayitaintso is offline
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Originally Posted by iheartphilly View Post
Philadelphia could become the next city to pass a scheduling law for retail and fast-food companies
http://www.philly.com/philly/news/fa...-20180614.html

Sheesh, the arguments are stretched all over the place in this article.

"Representatives from retail and food service associations, such as David French, senior vice president for government relations of the National Retail Federation, say laws like this don’t reflect the fact that people choose these industries because of their flexibility."

"That doesn’t square with the experience of Tori Price, who used to work at the Target at 12th and Chestnut to help support her mother and siblings. “There’s no way to support a family of seven or do any financial planning when my hours range constantly from 20 to 35 hours per week,” the 19-year-old West Philadelphian said in written testimony at the March hearing. She was called in to work that day so couldn’t attend the hearing in person. “We have an eviction notice on our house, but I don’t even know what rent I can afford, so how can I look for a new apartment?”"

"Melissa Bova, vice president of government affairs for the Pennsylvania Restaurant and Lodging Association, said that a scheduling law would hurt a company’s bottom line."

"Gym said the law would be good for business, too, pointing to research that showed that more consistent scheduling led to higher productivity and sales."

No one is gonna to really say why retail and fast-food chains don't want it. I feel like everyone is out of touch about this.
This is like $15 minimum wage tax. They think they're helping people but don't have the slightest grasp of even the most basic of economic principles.

Loonies like Gym (who is nothing more than a professional whiner/victim) are why our city is so dysfunctional. This new regulation will raise unemployment while increasing median income.

It will disenfranchise the uneducated b/c when then need to decide who's hours to cut it will be those at the lower levels of productivity. Their jobs will be eliminated to equalize hours and the high performers will get the hours thus FURTHERING the income gap.

These dopes in city council only care about virtue signalling sound bites rather than actual consequences.

Retail and fast food jobs are for teenagers who have school, sports and other activities that rightly prevents them from working 8 consecutive hours 5 days a week. I guess city council does'nt care about part time teenagers getting some work.
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