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  #41  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:00 PM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Relevance? It makes it sound like some sort of competition
It is relevant because it is a competition.

Businesses and highly skilled workers have their international options and Canadian cities have to make sure that we can compete with those cities in terms of liveability, urban and social infrastructure, affordability, cultural amenities, and urban vitality.
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  #42  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:04 PM
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I think Montréal has a bad reputation with its infrastructures, but it's about to change in a big way. Champlain , how much hatred the bridge receives , Turcot = epic fail right now ,
Bonaventure - A-720 , all look really bad. The new city entrances will give a new look to the city. The REM on the new Champlain will look world-class. In term of infra,
Montréal comes from very far, 10 years ago, I would have not believe it.

then we have Ste-Catherine street, who will be completely re-imagined. There are a lot of public realm projects in Montréal.
What are they doing to Ste. Catherine?
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  #43  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:19 PM
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^Potential pedestrianization of the downtown strip. Also they will make the sidewalks heated (Scandinavian style) and in general retrofit the sidewalks and street furniture to make the whole street more pedestrian-friendly, regardless of whether full pedestrianization happens or not.
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  #44  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Rico Rommheim View Post
^Potential pedestrianization of the downtown strip. Also they will make the sidewalks heated (Scandinavian style) and in general retrofit the sidewalks and street furniture to make the whole street more pedestrian-friendly, regardless of whether full pedestrianization happens or not.
yes, from De Bleury to Mansfield, 670m, starting in 2017, to end in 2021, $95M.

+ new Rue St-Paul
+restoration of Place Jacques-Cartier
+Dorchester Square renovation
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  #45  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:30 PM
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4 years seems like a long ass time for such a small stretch.
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  #46  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:33 PM
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^Yeah that's the amount of time it will take the Caisse to build a 67km metropolitain rapid transit network.

The Caisse should take over all infrastructural contracts from now on.

4 years of work on Ste-Cath? It will kill it.
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  #47  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:39 PM
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I'll be really surprised if the new network is done by 2025. I read yesterday that Ottawa has already started stalling. 2020? I'll believe it when I see it.
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  #48  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Rico Rommheim View Post
^Yeah that's the amount of time it will take the Caisse to build a 67km metropolitain rapid transit network.

The Caisse should take over all infrastructural contracts from now on.

4 years of work on Ste-Cath? It will kill it.
the street will probably be functional before 2021. + we have the underground network,
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  #49  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:49 PM
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I'll be really surprised if the new network is done by 2025. I read yesterday that Ottawa has already started stalling. 2020? I'll believe it when I see it.
the project will be managed by La Caisse, not by the government.
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  #50  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:51 PM
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the project will be managed by La Caisse, not by the government.
Stalling as in unsure if they wanna dish out the 1 billion or so. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montre...stem-1.3550165
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  #51  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 6:56 PM
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Stalling as in unsure if they wanna dish out the 1 billion or so. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montre...stem-1.3550165
Quebec will provide the remaining funds if Ottawa decides not to pay. A project as important as this one will not be cancelled. $1B ce n'est pas beaucoup d'argent, si c'est le montant qui reste à financer.
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Last edited by GreaterMontréal; Apr 24, 2016 at 7:06 PM.
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  #52  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 7:04 PM
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Interesting idea for a thread.

I wonder if we are truly seeing an urban renaissance, or is it simply a perfect storm of factors:

- the long-term trend migration to urban areas from rural areas continues unabated across the country

- immigration continues at near-record levels, and immigrants tend to settle in urban areas

- we are rapidly reaching the saturation point in terms of traffic congestion, road capacity and sprawl (and financial means to address/support them) in our large and medium-sized cities (even places like Halifax have surprisingly intense traffic jams now), which is pushing public officials to favour denser development patterns
I will also add to your points that many people are now becoming aware that the suburban model is failing financially, culturally and humanly. The car is probably the most destructive element for humankind.
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  #53  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 7:05 PM
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While I think that home size and privacy is still a big deal to most Canadians, I think that suburban living was a "forced choice" for a lot of people because downtown living was inconvenient and, frankly, not that desirable except for a niche group of people until 20 years ago.

There are some big differences between urban living then and urban living now.

For one, things like public school quality in the inner cities have probably improved considerably since the 1980s when most of the children who attended those schools were overwhelmingly working class immigrants and those of the underclass. If the CBC were to remake a show like Degrassi Junior High, they probably wouldn't choose to set it in Riverdale/Leslieville anymore.

Secondly, the convenience of suburban shopping options have largely arrived in the inner city. It's not just hipster boutiques; it's things like Winners and Costco and large format grocery stores. 20 years ago, you would be hard pressed to buy something like toilet paper or bedding in an inner city without paying a large price premium. People who write for alt-weeklies gripe about this, complaining that the arrival of these large format chains "suburbanizes" the city and makes it more sterile and less inclusive. That's the whole point, though: in order to make a city more appealing to a broader spectrum of the population, you need everyday shopping, not just niche retailing. It actually makes the city more inclusive, if you ask me.
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  #54  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 7:12 PM
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The car is probably the most destructive element for humankind.
Who were the first people to buy cars, other than the wealthy as toys? Rural doctors to save lives. Farmers to transport goods to market without rotting. Ambulances to rush people to hospital. Firefighters to swiftly reach burning houses.

In 1900 1/3 of the commercial grain harvest was gobbled up by horses and 1 million tons of disease-causing manure had to be shovelled off the streets of New York and London every year.

The nature of transport requires there to be a dominant mode at all times. Even if we replace the car with something else, in time, it too will be seen as some polluting, resource-draining health hazard that, when it first arrived, was emancipatory and liberating.
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  #55  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 7:45 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
Secondly, the convenience of suburban shopping options have largely arrived in the inner city. It's not just hipster boutiques; it's things like Winners and Costco and large format grocery stores. 20 years ago, you would be hard pressed to buy something like toilet paper or bedding in an inner city without paying a large price premium. People who write for alt-weeklies gripe about this, complaining that the arrival of these large format chains "suburbanizes" the city and makes it more sterile and less inclusive. That's the whole point, though: in order to make a city more appealing to a broader spectrum of the population, you need everyday shopping, not just niche retailing. It actually makes the city more inclusive, if you ask me.

I always find it a bit funny when people in Toronto bitch and moan about things like a Loblaws opening on the edge of Kensington Market. Much less the idea of a Walmart...

There are many American cities that would KILL to have investment from major shopping chains like that. If you can complain about a major grocery store opening things aren't too bad. Also I don't think they really threaten local boutique stores that much. The type of person who shops at a local butcher, cheese shop, fishmonger etc isn't going to switch to Walmart because it opens. The person who relies on the shitty overpriced convenience store will, however.
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  #56  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 8:52 PM
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Even within Vancouver travel's pretty slow. Yesterday it took 45 minutes to get across the city of Vancouver itself by car, from around UBC to Boundary. There's no rapid transit along most of that route and there are no highways.
From my sis' place in Burnaby I expected at first sight downtown Van would be a short drive away on some freeway, but it turned out to be a pilgrim's journey of nonsynchronized red lights lasting exactly one hour.
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  #57  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 8:56 PM
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From my sis' place in Burnaby I expected at first sight downtown Van would be a short drive away on some freeway, but it turned out to be a pilgrim's journey of nonsynchronized red lights lasting exactly one hour.
Which Vancouver freeway would you have in mind, lio?
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  #58  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 9:06 PM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Which Vancouver freeway would you have in mind, lio?
I hadn't yet paid attention to Greater Vancouver's road network at the time of that "at first sight". (I flew in and my sis picked me up at the airport.)



Edit: interesting to compare... what I was used to vs what I found, similar scale:

https://www.google.ca/maps/@45.47897...1,11.18z?hl=en

https://www.google.ca/maps/@49.26021...5,11.82z?hl=en
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  #59  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 9:28 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
I hadn't yet paid attention to Greater Vancouver's road network at the time of that "at first sight". (I flew in and my sis picked me up at the airport.)
There's a "highways vs. transit" debate in Vancouver but it doesn't capture the fact that the combined transportation network here is fairly limited compared what you find in Montreal or many American (more highway-focused) and European (transit-focused) cities. There just isn't much heavy duty transportation infrastructure given the size of the metropolitan area. I think Toronto's transportation infrastructure is woefully underbuilt as well. As a consequence people are piling into the areas that have reasonable commutes, which includes downtown condos that are walking distance to offices. Businesses also get pushed out to the edge of the city because of this, exacerbating the problem over the long run.

Halifax was mentioned as a city with surprisingly bad traffic jams. Its transportation network has seen only tweaks since circa 1970, but the population has grown by around 60% since then. No wonder the infrastructure is taxed to its limit during rush hour. Whenever a major infrastructure project is proposed there it gets shot down by people who are wealthy enough to own housing in an area with convenient transportation options.
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  #60  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 2:33 AM
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Can someone from Montreal please go to Toronto...........Yonge Street is a dump!
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