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  #21  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 8:07 PM
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  #22  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 8:19 PM
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Fantastic set. Cincinnati seems to have one of the most underrated urban fabrics in America.

I can see why some say it's still "stuck in the 90's" but it seems like, at least from some of those photos, things are slowly turning around.
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  #23  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 8:23 PM
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this is like borderline tribeca stuff.
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  #24  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:05 PM
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Thanks for this.
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  #25  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:14 PM
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What exactly is the cliffnotes reason(s) that Cincinnati isn't bigger and better today than it could be?
Based on what I recall learning when I visited Cincinnati's Union Terminal museum dedicated to the history of the city, Cincinnati was growing at the same time as Chicago and there was a large crossroads in terms of logistics. Goods transported by river was the historical trend, but rail transportation was on the rise. Cincinnati doubled down on river and Chicago invested in rail. Rail won, and Cincinnati is what it is today versus Chicago because of that.

Someone please feel free to correct me if I got that wrong! I haven't been to that museum in quite some time.
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  #26  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:15 PM
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Excellent pics. Cincy has probably the highest quality street level feel of any city between the coasts.

I did a long walk of Covington a few years back, and it struck me that there are almost no such places in the U.S. It's extremely white. It isn't gentrified, it doesn't have immigrants, or many minorities.

It's a white, poor-ish, moderately decayed inner city rowhouse hood. It isn't "bad", but isn't exactly "nice", either. It feels like 1970 or something.
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  #27  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:26 PM
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Based on what I recall learning when I visited Cincinnati's Union Terminal museum dedicated to the history of the city, Cincinnati was growing at the same time as Chicago and there was a large crossroads in terms of logistics. Goods transported by river was the historical trend, but rail transportation was on the rise. Cincinnati doubled down on river and Chicago invested in rail. Rail won, and Cincinnati is what it is today versus Chicago because of that.

Someone please feel free to correct me if I got that wrong! I haven't been to that museum in quite some time.
i can't speak 100% for cincinnati, but thats also the urban legend for st. louis. the reality is that all of the early interior cities started rail projects, and a quick glance at wikipedia shows that cincinnati granted a charter for a railroad in the 1830s, and st. louis in 1840s. non-chicago railroads simply didn't get built very quickly as they didn't have huge piles of new york money behind them like chicago. st. louis railroads were always running into problems and out of money.
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  #28  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Excellent pics. Cincy has probably the highest quality street level feel of any city between the coasts.

I did a long walk of Covington a few years back, and it struck me that there are almost no such places in the U.S. It's extremely white. It isn't gentrified, it doesn't have immigrants, or many minorities.

It's a white, poor-ish, moderately decayed inner city rowhouse hood. It isn't "bad", but isn't exactly "nice", either. It feels like 1970 or something.
that's always sort of been my take on it as well, although it has been spruced and hipstered up a bit. decayed is probably too harsh (on the whole).
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  #29  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:32 PM
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i can't speak 100% for cincinnati, but thats also the urban legend for st. louis. the reality is that all of the early interior cities started rail projects, and a quick glance at wikipedia shows that cincinnati granted a charter for a railroad in the 1830s, and st. louis in 1840s. non-chicago railroads simply didn't get built very quickly as they didn't have huge piles of new york money behind them like chicago.
also (and i know you know this, but for the edification of others), the civil war began in 1860, and cincy & st. louis were A LOT closer to the heat of the action than chicago was. new york and boston money got skittish of places too close to the south and flooded into chicago instead. that was when chicago really started to take off and head for the stars, leaving former competitors like cincy and st. louis in its dust.


anyway, fantastic pics of a true american urban gem! cincy never disappoints.
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  #30  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Excellent pics. Cincy has probably the highest quality street level feel of any city between the coasts.

I did a long walk of Covington a few years back, and it struck me that there are almost no such places in the U.S. It's extremely white. It isn't gentrified, it doesn't have immigrants, or many minorities.

It's a white, poor-ish, moderately decayed inner city rowhouse hood. It isn't "bad", but isn't exactly "nice", either. It feels like 1970 or something.
Downtown and the Mainstrasse neighborhood are currently gentrifying at a decent pace. Aside from that, you are correct that's is generally a lower-class white city with a sub-section of African-Americans southeast of downtown. Its neighbor, Newport, is far healthier overall. Covington is quite underrated, urban-wise, but so is the entire Cincinnati area. Hell, even Lawrenceburg (suburb in Indiana) has a lovely downtown.
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  #31  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 9:35 PM
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also (and i know you know this, but for the edification of others), the civil war began in 1860, and cincy & st. louis were A LOT closer to the heat of the action than chicago was. new york and boston money got skittish of places too close to the south and flooded into chicago. that was when chicago really started to take off and head for the stars, leaving former competitors like cincy and st. louis in its dust.
yes, this was a problem as well. the east coast sort of pulled up stakes and doubled down on chicago.
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  #32  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 10:01 PM
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that's always sort of been my take on it as well, although it has been spruced and hipstered up a bit. decayed is probably too harsh (on the whole).
Yeah, decayed is probably too harsh. And the downtown/waterfront seemed semi-gentrified.

But the neighborhoods, at least some of them, had a very unique vibe, IMO, at least for 2018. Kinda time-warpy. Not just working class whites, but a certain typology you don't see too much in our hyper gentrified and bombed out cities.
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  #33  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 10:07 PM
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Yeah, decayed is probably too harsh. And the downtown/waterfront seemed semi-gentrified.

But the neighborhoods, at least some of them, had a very unique vibe, IMO, at least for 2018. Kinda time-warpy. Not just working class whites, but a certain typology you don't see too much in our hyper gentrified and bombed out cities.
Basically, Appalachia. "Lived in," in a sense, is what I believe you are saying, which would be correct. Covington isn't in Appalachia but it certainly feels like it in (most) parts.
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  #34  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 10:30 PM
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Yeah, decayed is probably too harsh. And the downtown/waterfront seemed semi-gentrified.

But the neighborhoods, at least some of them, had a very unique vibe, IMO, at least for 2018. Kinda time-warpy. Not just working class whites, but a certain typology you don't see too much in our hyper gentrified and bombed out cities.
definitely. like something from a 1960s or 70s time magazine article, totally time warpy.
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  #35  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2018, 10:45 PM
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definitely. like something from a 1960s or 70s time magazine article, totally time warpy.
it's been a while since i've been, but i got that exact same vibe from covington.

a kind of "where the hell am i right now? does this place really still exist?" feeling.
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Last edited by Steely Dan; Mar 6, 2018 at 10:57 PM.
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  #36  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 12:09 AM
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Covington and Cincinnati both have an Appalachian feel to me. Definitely saw some similarities with Pittsburgh and the stuff I saw in West Virginia.

Although I wouldn't go so far as saying Covington is decayed. It is well preserved, I saw lots of people walking around and restorations all over the place and a new modern apartment going up downtown (https://www.duvenecksquare.com) with some good restaurants here and there.

The people in the area definitely have a "white people that time forgot" look to them. In OTR you see some trendy people but everywhere else it was aggressively middle american.
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  #37  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 6:18 AM
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The largest US city I've never been to. Gotta get there at some point.

Suddenly I feel like rollerblading:

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  #38  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 6:41 AM
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i think cincinnati has the highest quality vernacular in the midwest. i’m not sure why, exactly, but i suppose its a combination of quality building materials/brick and early, pre-hyper industrial wealth.
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  #39  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 2:15 PM
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Some of the most beautiful residential architecture in all of North America.
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  #40  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 3:43 PM
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I love it when people "discover" Cincinnati for the first time and are just completely shocked that such a city exists outside the coasts. As a city it's definitely got all sorts of functional problems that may make it less desirable to actually live in for some folks, but the look on peoples' faces when I show them Cincinnati's architecture for the first time is always priceless. Thanks for this thread!

And if you ever find yourself in the Dayton region, feel free to PM me and I'll gladly help you discover more of your new home state!
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