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  #41  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 3:58 PM
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i think cincinnati has the highest quality vernacular in the midwest. i’m not sure why, exactly, but i suppose its a combination of quality building materials/brick and early, pre-hyper industrial wealth.
In terms of the unique density (not the rowhouses and semi-rowhouses, but the tenement-style housing which survived in Over-The-Rhine) I've heard it's a combination of the early boom of the city and topography.

Essentially, Cincinnati was the first great interior boomtown, located as it was along the Ohio River. But the steep hills surrounding the basin that comprised the core of the city was built out by the 1850s. Horsecars couldn't be used to access the steep hilltop areas surrounding the basin, because horses couldn't traverse the steep hillside roads in icy weather. It wasn't until the 1870s and 1880s that the hilltops began being developed through the development of inclines and cable cars, and of course in the 1890s electric streetcars came along. Still, for several key decades the "bowl" of Cinci was under tremendous geographic constraints, meaning they built upward in a way that really was only being done in Manhattan and parts of Boston concurrently.
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  #42  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 5:17 PM
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It has that super unique Ohio River Valley look that if you're into architecture at all you can't mistake it for anything else. Although if you look at photos of Chicago before the fire it had a similar look with the super elaborate cornices and facades.
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  #43  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 6:19 PM
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The thing that stands out in this thread is that there seems to be very few pedestrians anywhere, it seems dead. Was this just a random Sunday perhaps or are these areas with beautiful architecture pretty much abandoned? I think that's lending to the "creepy" vibe some mentioned above.
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  #44  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 6:26 PM
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The thing that stands out in this thread is that there seems to be very few pedestrians anywhere, it seems dead. Was this just a random Sunday perhaps or are these areas with beautiful architecture pretty much abandoned? I think that's lending to the "creepy" vibe some mentioned above.
while i wouldn't read a lot into that, midwestern cities outside of chicago are just different in that respect, even in gentrified or intact areas. people have entire floor-plates of buildings whereas in new york city there would be 10 people. the human density is just a lot less, even in a good built environment.

if you were there you would see people out and about but it's pretty easy to take a photo with nobody in it. as far as myself, i generally go out of my way to wait for people to pass when photographing buildings a lot of the time. it's a weird midwestern courtesy i think, even though the the OP is from PDX.

but back to my original point, cincinnati isn't a huge region, but it has a pretty massive amount of solid urban neighborhoods that people are spread across. people arent packed into a small footprint "city living" district like nashville.
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  #45  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 6:37 PM
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the human density is just a lot less, even in a good built environment.
yeah, even over-the-rhine's population density tops out in the 17,000 ppsm range at the block group level.

i'd expect a peak block group population density at least twice that in such a structurally dense built environment in a northeast city.
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  #46  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2018, 11:58 PM
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yeah, even over-the-rhine's population density tops out in the 17,000 ppsm range at the block group level.

i'd expect a peak block group population density at least twice that in such a structurally dense built environment in a northeast city.
i think the ironbound in newark is around 30k for comparison. of course equivalent east coast neighborhoods are packed with immigrant familes, etc. household size in a neighborhood like over the rhine is probably plunging as incomes go up.
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  #47  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 12:57 AM
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:Fantastic set. Love the exterior shot of that beautiful church.
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  #48  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 1:27 AM
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Wow that was good! I'm really looking forward to Pittsburgh. Btw thanks for introducing me to Kelly Lee Owens, I like her music.
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  #49  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 2:15 PM
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i think the ironbound in newark is around 30k for comparison. of course equivalent east coast neighborhoods are packed with immigrant familes, etc. household size in a neighborhood like over the rhine is probably plunging as incomes go up.
I think a lot of the Over-The-Rhine buildings were effectively vacant and abandoned before the neighborhood was gentrified. Likely even some of the ones which had stores occupying their first story had upper stories which were unused except for storage. Here in Pittsburgh, even though Downtown has had something of a renaissance over the last decade, there are still tons of smaller (2-6 story) 19th century buildings downtown which have vacant upper stories - likely because the long-standing owners don't have access to the capital needed to do an extensive rehab.
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  #50  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 4:15 PM
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I think a lot of the Over-The-Rhine buildings were effectively vacant and abandoned before the neighborhood was gentrified. Likely even some of the ones which had stores occupying their first story had upper stories which were unused except for storage. Here in Pittsburgh, even though Downtown has had something of a renaissance over the last decade, there are still tons of smaller (2-6 story) 19th century buildings downtown which have vacant upper stories - likely because the long-standing owners don't have access to the capital needed to do an extensive rehab.
good point, i've seen this before. my favorite is the mixed use corner building thats two or three stories but most of it is used as junk storage except for the bar/commerical space area, which is used as living space.

in an old neighborhood i lived in on the southside of st. louis i had a neighbor named "spider" who lived in an old corner bar building in this manner. still had the old style sign, bar, and everything.
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  #51  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 4:16 PM
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I think a lot of the Over-The-Rhine buildings were effectively vacant and abandoned before the neighborhood was gentrified. Likely even some of the ones which had stores occupying their first story had upper stories which were unused except for storage. Here in Pittsburgh, even though Downtown has had something of a renaissance over the last decade, there are still tons of smaller (2-6 story) 19th century buildings downtown which have vacant upper stories - likely because the long-standing owners don't have access to the capital needed to do an extensive rehab.
yep otr is a poster child for a back to the city movement success story in full progress. luckily that came along and it escaped even more teardowns.
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  #52  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 4:26 PM
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Just blew me away. I knew it was good, but not this good. Thanks for the eye-opener.
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  #53  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 4:32 PM
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this is like borderline tribeca stuff.
yes some of cinci is like a stumpy version. it always shocks how much some of it looks alike to neighborhood blocks around ny, but in miniature. its like stuck in its time, whereas they more typically added on a few floors to the similar ny stock in the late 1800s, while cinci just spread out. so cinci generally often has like the nicer/original cornices that is for sure. its all getting fixed up steadily.
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  #54  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 5:20 PM
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i think the ironbound in newark is around 30k for comparison.
actually, block group densities in newark's ironbound peak in the 60,000 ppsm range, with several more in the 50's and 40's.



Quote:
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of course equivalent east coast neighborhoods are packed with immigrant familes, etc. household size in a neighborhood like over the rhine is probably plunging as incomes go up.
yep, immigrant families tend to really pack in the bodies, something that OTR more or less lacks, at least in relation to NE cities like newark.
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  #55  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 5:41 PM
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actually, block group densities in newark's ironbound peak in the 60,000 ppsm range, with several more in the 50's and 40's.




yep, immigrant families tend to really pack in the bodies, something that OTR more or less lacks, at least in relation to NE cities like newark.
i just pulled that off some random website...now my understanding was that it was the entire neighborhood called north ironbound, i usually prefer to look at larger areas when looking at densities.
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  #56  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 5:51 PM
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It jumped out to me in this picture but then I went back and noticed that it was very common. I don't think I've seen these transom-type windows built into the cornice structure like this elsewhere unless I just never noticed, certainly not in Philadelphia.

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  #57  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 6:02 PM
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i just pulled that off some random website...now my understanding was that it was the entire neighborhood called north ironbound, i usually prefer to look at larger areas when looking at densities.
sure, it might average out to somewhere in the 30's.

i only brought up block groups because i had previous talked about OTR's block group density peaking somewhere in the 17,000 ppsm range.

if we want to talk about OTR as whole (at least how it's defined by google maps), then we're looking at a density closer to the 12,000 ppsm range.

that's quite a bit lower than i would have expected for such a structurally dense area.

in any event, OTR is cool as hell, and one of the best looking urban places anywhere in the nation.
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  #58  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 6:14 PM
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Great Cincinnati thread - I'm hoping to get back there this year.

"Ok wow...I'm blown away by the architecture there. I'm surprised it was that ornate given it's the midwest; Chicago/Milwaukee/Minneapolis architecture, while pleasant, isn't nearly as fanciful looking."

'Great Lakes' architecture is more "brawny" than 'River City' - think Cincinnati, St. Louis, etc. Regarding ornate/fanciful, check out the interior of the Hilton (to the right of Carew Tower in this pic):




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  #59  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 6:39 PM
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It jumped out to me in this picture but then I went back and noticed that it was very common. I don't think I've seen these transom-type windows built into the cornice structure like this elsewhere unless I just never noticed, certainly not in Philadelphia.

i noticed that last time i was in cincy/no-ky. i've not really seen it anywhere else that i can recall, other than maybe very infrequently in louisville and maybe st. louis. but rarely.

oh...pretty sure i've seen that in london/uk, funnily enough!
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Last edited by Centropolis; Mar 8, 2018 at 6:59 PM.
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  #60  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2018, 7:15 PM
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The largest US city I've never been to. Gotta get there at some point.

Suddenly I feel like rollerblading:

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That movie does make you curious about the city.
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