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  #41  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2018, 6:08 PM
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Pittsburgh has significantly higher GDP growth compared to Portland (the one in Oregon), nearly every "rustbelt" city has higher economic growth right now actually, the population doesn't paint a full picture.

Great pics BTW, some high-quality stuff there in Pittsburgh.
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  #42  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2018, 6:38 PM
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Originally Posted by The North One View Post
Pittsburgh has significantly higher GDP growth compared to Portland (the one in Oregon), nearly every "rustbelt" city has higher economic growth right now actually, the population doesn't paint a full picture.

Great pics BTW, some high-quality stuff there in Pittsburgh.
The definition of "rust belt" cities is predicated on their boom-bust economies. We're seeing a boom right now. Pittsburgh is a bit more diversified than that, and the others are getting there.
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  #43  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2018, 8:29 PM
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
Right, but it's just not a sign of a healthy city where real estate can be had for that cheap. This is best explained with street parking: Would you rather live on a street with abandoned homes and empty lots but plentiful parking?
Speaking personally, of course not. But when I lived in Lawrenceville some of the old timers wistfully looked back on when half the houses were vacant or occupied by elderly people without cars and they had no issue finding a space.
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  #44  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2018, 8:52 PM
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Not really, boom and bust is the nature of capitalism and not something Portland is immune to as opposed to Pittsburgh. Respectively Portland's growth is still below national averages.
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  #45  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2018, 11:46 PM
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Not really, boom and bust is the nature of capitalism and not something Portland is immune to as opposed to Pittsburgh. Respectively Portland's growth is still below national averages.
I'm not doing city vs city because I love Pittsburgh, this is strictly to address your GDP comment because it is flat out wrong. Pittsburgh's GDP was $126 million in 2016 and had a year over year growth rate of .1%. Portland's was $151 million with a year over year growth rate of 3% when the US average is 1.6%. The year before that it was 4.3%. Out of 388 MSAs, it ranked 20th in GDP and 79th in terms of percent growth with the latest data. We aren't posting Texas numbers, but we sure aren't doing poorly. Source
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  #46  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2018, 2:10 AM
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Speaking personally, of course not. But when I lived in Lawrenceville some of the old timers wistfully looked back on when half the houses were vacant or occupied by elderly people without cars and they had no issue finding a space.
Oh ya, you hear that annoying argument in gentrifying neighborhoods everywhere.

But yea, Pittsburgh is a cool little city.
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  #47  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2018, 4:12 AM
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thanks for this lengthy photo tour, cityscapes.

I went back and scrolled through again, and it's really cool to see scenes I'm so familiar with in person, but feel that I'm noticing the amount of new development more from your photos... if that makes any sense. And helps me realize how the burgh easily punches above its weight class.

Is this one of those $350+ per night rooms at the Ace?
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  #48  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2018, 4:22 AM
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Originally Posted by subterranean View Post
I'm not doing city vs city because I love Pittsburgh, this is strictly to address your GDP comment because it is flat out wrong. Pittsburgh's GDP was $126 million in 2016 and had a year over year growth rate of .1%. Portland's was $151 million with a year over year growth rate of 3% when the US average is 1.6%. The year before that it was 4.3%. Out of 388 MSAs, it ranked 20th in GDP and 79th in terms of percent growth with the latest data. We aren't posting Texas numbers, but we sure aren't doing poorly. Source
Ehh, based on this Pittsburgh was growing well over 3% in 2015. Which is what gave me the view of Pitt's economy.
https://www.opendatanetwork.com/enti..._gdp?year=2016

Although it's taken a nosedive in 2016, all other "rustbelt" metro GDP's are steady in 2016 so this seems exclusive to Pitt.

This graph put's Portland's metro area at 1.28% growth in 2016 which is below the national average for the year.
https://www.opendatanetwork.com/enti...ange?year=2016

That 3% comes from growth since 2001. Portland Also took a similar nosedive in 2012.

After looking at this I see how I might have interpreted some numbers in the wrong context.
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  #49  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2018, 1:53 PM
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Originally Posted by pj3000 View Post
thanks for this lengthy photo tour, cityscapes.

I went back and scrolled through again, and it's really cool to see scenes I'm so familiar with in person, but feel that I'm noticing the amount of new development more from your photos... if that makes any sense. And helps me realize how the burgh easily punches above its weight class.

Is this one of those $350+ per night rooms at the Ace?
It's a room in one of the annex galleries of the Mattress Factory (installation art museum, for those not in the know).
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  #50  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2018, 2:24 PM
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It's a room in one of the annex galleries of the Mattress Factory (installation art museum, for those not in the know).
Ah, I didn't realize that... haven't been there in years.

Just to clarify, I knew it wasn't an Ace Hotel room... though it's not too far off from what they look like at the Pittsburgh location. I just can't get over that people are willing to plop down $300-400 per night to stay in room that looks like and has all the amenities of my first apartment out of college
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  #51  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2018, 4:42 PM
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Helluva set. Love the 'burgh. Gotta get back there sometime. Thanks!!!!
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  #52  
Old Posted May 22, 2018, 1:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Murphy de la Sucre View Post
The first picture the angle and the downtown scene are exactly the same as 20 years ago, which means our Dear Pitts hasn't moved any step forward since then. No Good.
They have only really built PNC building since then.
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  #53  
Old Posted May 22, 2018, 1:27 AM
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.

Last edited by lhueaglesphan; May 22, 2018 at 1:28 AM. Reason: delete
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  #54  
Old Posted May 22, 2018, 4:51 PM
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Originally Posted by lhueaglesphan View Post
They have only really built PNC building since then.
No true at all.

Tower Two Sixty

The tower @ PNC Plaza

Three PNC Plaza

PNC First Side Center

Mellon Client Service Center

David L Lawrence Convention Center

We had a lot of historic preservation over the past 20 years as well. The streets and sidewalks were enhanced with granite, red brick and street trees. Smithfield St is the last major street in need of an upgrade.
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  #55  
Old Posted May 22, 2018, 9:25 PM
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Originally Posted by lhueaglesphan View Post
They have only really built PNC building since then.
It's the only building of significant height (something that's going to make a mark on the skyline) built in the last couple decades, but Pittsburgh has certainly built much more since then, with much of it being in neighborhoods outside the core downtown.

Much more impressive is what Pittsburgh has done down at the ground level anyway. I couldn't give a fuck if another 50+story tower ever gets built here or not. I'm much more happy to see infill/reuse/revitalization anyway. And considering the types of firms coming to Pittsburgh for significant operations centers like Google, Apple, Facebook, SAP, CSC, Uber, Bosch, Argo AI, etc. (i.e., tech), office towers aren't really what these companies look for anymore because they know they're employees generally don't want to work in a cubicle on the 46th floor.

Because working in a skyscraper sucks for the most part.
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  #56  
Old Posted May 22, 2018, 10:43 PM
jmecklenborg jmecklenborg is offline
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Come visit Cincinnati next. Similar rugged topography with all kinds of stuff from the 1800s still around.
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  #57  
Old Posted May 23, 2018, 10:47 PM
The Best Forumer The Best Forumer is offline
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Originally Posted by subterranean View Post
I'm not doing city vs city because I love Pittsburgh, this is strictly to address your GDP comment because it is flat out wrong. Pittsburgh's GDP was $126 million in 2016 and had a year over year growth rate of .1%. Portland's was $151 million with a year over year growth rate of 3% when the US average is 1.6%. The year before that it was 4.3%. Out of 388 MSAs, it ranked 20th in GDP and 79th in terms of percent growth with the latest data. We aren't posting Texas numbers, but we sure aren't doing poorly. Source
Really??????
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  #58  
Old Posted May 23, 2018, 10:52 PM
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Nice shots... I like the angle of the sun...
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  #59  
Old Posted May 23, 2018, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by The Best Forumer View Post
Really??????
Actually, no. I messed that up. Those numbers are in billions.
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  #60  
Old Posted May 24, 2018, 1:28 AM
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Originally Posted by wpipkins2 View Post
No true at all.

Tower Two Sixty

The tower @ PNC Plaza

Three PNC Plaza

PNC First Side Center

Mellon Client Service Center

David L Lawrence Convention Center

We had a lot of historic preservation over the past 20 years as well. The streets and sidewalks were enhanced with granite, red brick and street trees. Smithfield St is the last major street in need of an upgrade.
I meant anything of significant height.
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