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  #241  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2004, 5:20 PM
wrightchr wrightchr is offline
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the brewersfest was great...but i don't think i'll be able to make this. it would be cool to go though.

<b>City beer festival will offer 'Tasters Sessions'</b>
Thursday, September 16, 2004

The sixth annual Capital City Invitational Beer Festival will be held Saturday at Appalachian Brewing Company, 50 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg.

There will be three sessions. A "Tasters Session" will be held from noon to 3 p.m.; the cost is $22.50 plus tax. The other sessions will be conducted from 4 to 7 p.m. and from 8 to 11 p.m.; the cost for each is $27.50 plus tax.

Prices include microbrewery samples, dinner, a commemorative glass and live entertainment.

Designated driver tickets will be available for $12 plus tax.

For tickets, call Appalachian Brewing Company at 221-1080 or The Box at Whitaker Center, 214-2787.

A total of 21 breweries from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey and New York will take part, including the host company and Harrisburg's Troegs Brewing Company.

Other midstate participants include GettysBrew Restaurant & Brewery, Gettysburg; Kclinger's Tavern, Hanover; Lancaster Brewing Co., Lancaster; Market Cross Pub & Brewery, Carlisle; and Otto's Pub & Brewery, State College.

More information is available at www.abcbrew.com.
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  #242  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2004, 2:24 AM
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i came across this news flash on the patriot's website; however, no additional information could be provided. i'm not sure where the health and welfare garage is? i'm sure the plans with this new structure will be released soon.

Judicial Center plan to be unveiled

Gov. Ed Rendell and Chief Supreme Court Justice Ralph Cappy are expected to announce design and construction plans today for the long-awaited Judicial Center to be built at Commonwealth Avenue and North Street, atop the Health and Welfare Building's garage. The center, discussed for more than a decade and projected three years ago to cost about $85 million, will consolidate most state court offices.

These include the administrative staff of the Supreme and Superior courts now scattered in Mechanicsburg and Philadelphia; the Commonwealth Court, now in the South Office Building; and judicial committees and boards. All three appellate courts will maintain offices in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia to accept legal filings. Supreme Court justices will retain their ceremonial courtroom and chambers in the Capitol.
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  #243  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2004, 2:45 AM
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this is great news...it will be a great addition to the capital complex and also the city. i never knew the commonwealth courts were NOT located in a central location.

GOVERNOR RENDELL, CHIEF JUSTICE CAPPY ANNOUNCE CONSTRUCTION PLANS FOR NEW JUDICIAL CENTER

http://www.state.pa.us/papower/cwp/v...?Q=438217&A=11

HARRISBURG: Governor Edward G. Rendell and Chief Justice Ralph Cappy of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court today unveiled drawings for the design and construction of Pennsylvania’s first-ever Judicial Center. The new facility will house the Pennsylvania Supreme, Superior and Commonwealth courts.

“The new Judicial Center will ensure that for the first time, the courts of Pennsylvania have one home that is befitting of the vital and important role they play,” said Governor Rendell. “By locating the facility in the Capitol Complex, the courts will have a prominent and proper place to conduct their business side-by-side with the legislative and executive branches.”

The new facility, to be located at Commonwealth and North streets between the Finance and Health and Welfare buildings in Harrisburg, will be about 330,000 square feet and stand nine stories high. Project design is scheduled for completion in August 2005, and construction is scheduled for completion in the first quarter of 2008. To accommodate the loss of parking spaces and new employees working downtown, 1,700 parking spaces will be built for the center.

“The new Judicial Center design balances symbolism with functionality,” said Chief Justice Cappy. “The building will appropriately reflect the status of Pennsylvania’s judiciary as a coequal branch of government with the legislative and executive branches.”

At the direction of the Governor, the Department of General Services worked with the courts to find the most cost-effective way to construct the facility.

“After a careful evaluation of the cost and the Commonwealth’s budget, we are confident the project will be completed on-time and on-budget,” said General Services Secretary Donald T. Cunningham Jr. “By working in cooperation with the courts, we will construct a first-class, cost-effective facility that stays within the appropriation authorized by the General Assembly several years ago.”

The General Assembly has allocated $98.4 million for construction of the facility.
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  #244  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2004, 3:11 AM
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yeah the pine street border still cuts off restaurant row, but at least a few more blocks were added....the reason is simple: bureaucratic red tape, you would think it would be easy to extend the borders, but these new ones have been comprimised over many months which explains the smaller size than what was originally envisioned
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  #245  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2004, 3:53 AM
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Yeah, it was a big pain in the ass for us in law enforcement to have our courts scattered all over like that. It's nice to see they will finally be where they belong, in the capital city!!!!

What I am really excited about is the impact this will have on the area, especially downtown. Imagine the people that will be drawn to the area now!!!! Harrisburg is really coming into its own and it's so exciting to see. Thanks for the info, Chris.

*cough* yet another reason to keep the law school in Carlisle *cough*

On a lighter (and more fun ) note, I have got to give it up to this area for a sec. A friend and I went DT tonight, and I must say, this area has some amazingly beautiful women lurking around here now!!!! Everytime we go out we are shocked at what we see. And many of them are actually nice and polite too, not snobby and stuck up *gasp*. I remember a time when you would go out and see a few hot women here and there. Now it seems like every single one is a model. Go HBG, Go HBG!!! :carrot: :scraper:
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  #246  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2004, 10:09 PM
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here's some more info

Plan unveiled to put top courts' offices under same roof

Friday, September 17, 2004
BY CHARLES THOMPSON
Of The Patriot-News

Gov. Ed Rendell, joined by Supreme Court Chief Justice Ralph Cappy, yesterday unveiled design plans for a long-debated $145 million nine-story judicial center that will house offices of the state Supreme, Superior and Commonwealth courts.

A two-year construction project is expected to start in the spring of 2006, Rendell said.

The center will be built next to the Health and Welfare Building on the site of the existing parking lot and underground garage along Commonwealth Avenue and North Street.

Secretary of General Services Donald Cunningham said the lost parking spaces will be replaced with one or two new garages, with an estimated 1,700 spaces.

Cunningham said sites on Forster and Seventh streets are being evaluated for the garages.

Faced with a substantial budget crunch, Rendell last year froze design work on the judicial center as part of an overall review of state capital projects.

Yesterday, he said he put the project back on track because he was convinced it would give the courts an appropriate facility and save money by consolidating operations.

State court functions are currently scattered throughout the midstate at rented sites. The new center will generate annual savings of at least $2 million in rent, Cappy said.

Rendell said he expects the new site will benefit management and productivity and "more than pay for the cost of the construction."

The Administrative Office of the Pennsylvania Courts, the main administrative arm for state, county and local courts, will be the biggest tenant at the center. It currently leases buildings on the West Shore.

The judicial center will also house all courtrooms and offices for Commonwealth Court, currently housed in the top two floors of the Irvis Office Building. The court hears cases brought by state agencies and appeals arising from state and local government actions.

Other uses will include:


Middle District filing offices for Supreme and Superior courts. Those courts will continue to hear cases in the historic Supreme Court chambers in the Capitol and at other sites around the state, Cappy noted.


A unified judiciary center including a library and conference center capable of housing committee and task forces meetings or continuing education conferences for judges, district justices, lawyers and the like.

Upon completion, tentatively projected for the winter of 2008, the building will house approximately 400 employees, court officials said.

Sen. Jeffrey Piccola, R-Dauphin, a longtime proponent of the new center, said it will be good for the public and the other branches of government to have the court system headquartered at the Capitol. He also said the addition of several hundred employees would benefit the city.

Rendell praised Cappy for working with the administration to keep construction costs within the original allocation of $98.4 million.

"Even though that appropriation was made several years ago, I did not want to have to go back to the Legislature and ask for additional capital costs," he said.

The overall budget includes nearly $47 million for furnishings and equipment, and engineering and design services. Costs will be paid through state bond proceeds, Cunningham said.

CHARLES THOMPSON: 705-5724 or cthompson@patriot-news.com
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  #247  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2004, 3:40 PM
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Thanks for the info, Chris!!! That is going to be an awesome addition to the gov't area of DT.

Check this out. :carrot:

Dickinson, law school discuss merger

Law school, Dickinson discuss merger

Saturday, September 18, 2004
BY JAN MURPHY
Of The Patriot-News

One month after its plans for The Dickinson School of Law collapsed, Penn State University may end its affiliation with the school and hand it over to Dickinson College.

The university and Dickinson College announced yesterday they are discussing the idea of a merger between the Carlisle institutions. No timeline is established for making a decision.

Although they bear the same name and have adjacent campuses in Carlisle, the law school and Dickinson College have not been affiliated for 90 years.

The proximity of the campus and its history and commitment to the Carlisle community, however, prompted Dickinson College to consider the merger, said spokeswoman Christine Dugan.

College President William Durden referred a call to his office to Dugan. Dugan said, "It's still so preliminary that there's not really a lot of specifics that we can discuss."

Last month, the law school board of governors rejected an offer from Penn State to build a second campus in State College.

A merger would be a radical change for Dickinson College, Dugan said.

"The law school would alter our identity significantly," Dugan said. "So we have to carefully consider our mission and how this opportunity fits into our mission."

LeRoy Zimmerman, chairman of the law school's board of governors, said he has not participated in any discussion to dissolve the merger with Penn State. He said he learned about it through a telephone call yesterday morning from law school dean Philip McConnaughay.

"It sounds very interesting," Zimmerman said. "But there are still a lot of issues that need to be discussed."

Among them is Penn State's nearly $8.5 million investment in the law school since the two merged in 1997. There is also the $4 million loan, which the law school promised to pay back.

An agreement between Penn State and Dickinson College would also require the support of the law school's board. But Zimmerman said the move would likely require court approval, as was the case when the law school merged with Penn State.

During a briefing to university trustees yesterday about the law school's decision to spurn Penn State's offer to build a second campus in State College, Penn State President Graham Spanier made no mention of a possible Penn State-Dickinson Law School dissolution.

Instead, he spoke of the vision that the university had for a dual-campus law school. Penn State wanted to create an alternative to Dickinson's general law and government law emphasis by establishing a campus in State College for law students looking for interdisciplinary course offerings, joint degrees and access to resources of a research university.

The second campus was intended to raise the law school's national rankings and enhance its appeal to top-notch students. The university offered to spend $60 million to build the second campus.

After the law school turned down that offer, the law school board passed a resolution to plan for a $50 million law school to be built in Carlisle by 2008. Penn State promised to kick in up to $10 million and Gov. Ed Rendell committed $25 million, leaving the law school with $15 million to raise.

That $10 million pledge from the university was repeated during the trustees' meeting, along with a mention of coming back later with more definitive construction plans for the law school upgrade.

"We now must move forward and consider a future for the law school that will best serve future law students," Spanier told trustees.

He went on to say some law school faculty and staff were thinking about leaving their positions as a result of the law school board's decision to keep the school in its entirety in Carlisle. "I would urge them to allow us the time to chart the future course of the law school and other companion programs at Penn State," he told trustees.

Spanier could not be reached for comment after the announcement about the discussions with Dickinson College. Bill Mahon, university spokesman, said it's too early to discuss whether Penn State might start a law school at State College.

"This would not preclude it," he said. "We've had that option for 150 years, but we don't have any plans at the time being."

Zimmerman said that since the law school's merger with Penn State, issues have arisen as to "whether or not either institution was totally happy with the whole arrangement. But this opportunity [with Dickinson College] could provide a win-win situation."

He added: "At first blush, the issue of the name and location immediately go away. There are positives right there. ... But there are always issues that have to be discussed carefully before a second marriage."

Zimmerman spread the word to law school board members yesterday afternoon. But not all of them had checked their e-mail by the time the announcement was made public.

Law school board member Jason Kutulakis was caught by surprise. "It's quite a shock, actually," he said.

Kutulakis said he was intrigued by the idea, saying the college and the law school share the same historical philosophy and longstanding ties to the community.

"It's an exciting possibility," he said. "It's refreshing to see someone else that wants to make Dickinson School of Law the best it can be."

Carlisle officials also welcomed the opportunity.

"It could be very good in the long run," said state Sen. Hal Mowery, R-Cumberland. "I don't really think Penn State really wanted it that bad, after finding out there was a big push in the community to want to keep it here."

Moreover, Dickinson "ranks very high among independent colleges, not just in Pennsylvania, but nationally," said Mowery, a Dickinson College graduate. He said that could help boost the law school's ranking.

Carlisle Mayor Kirk Wilson said a college-law school merger was possibly the best possible outcome.

"It is an excellent opportunity," Wilson said. "The type of commitment Bill Durden has made will cross over to the law school. I honestly feel that with Durden it can become a much better institution and be more highly recognized than under the tutelage of Penn State."

"From a community standpoint, I don't think we could have a better situation," said Carlisle Borough Council President Frank Rankin. "Dickinson College has proven over the years to be a substantial and a very important part of the community and a key partner in the community. The fact they are willing to entertain acquiring the law school just gives me positive feelings."

This would not be the first time a Penn State expansion hasn't gone according to plan.

In 1997, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center merged with Danville-based Geisinger Medical Center to become Penn State Geisinger Health System, a system that covered much of central Pennsylvania.

But within two years, officials were negotiating the division of the two entities. They finally split in the summer of 2000 in a court settlement that cost Penn State $116.5 million.
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  #248  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2004, 11:57 PM
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i think a dickinson college/law school merger would be very beneficial for both the carlisle schools. the dissolution with penn state would also give them what they obviously want...a law school located at university park. this could be a win/win situation.
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  #249  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2004, 2:55 PM
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I agree.

Chris, how's the flooding where you are at? I am planning on going down sometime today and getting as close as I can for some pics.
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  #250  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2004, 3:01 PM
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the flooding has closed off a large section in wormleysburg, mainly front street from elm down through the bottleneck. i'm a block or two north of the closed section. i hope it doesn't get much higher i think i'm going to go down and get some pictures as well. i might take a stroll over the harvey taylor bridge.
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  #251  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2004, 4:10 PM
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Hi Harrisburg and PA people. Keep up the good work.
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  #252  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2004, 4:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrightchr
the flooding has closed off a large section in wormleysburg, mainly front street from elm down through the bottleneck. i'm a block or two north of the closed section. i hope it doesn't get much higher i think i'm going to go down and get some pictures as well. i might take a stroll over the harvey taylor bridge.
I just found out that I might not have water by the end of the day. I barely have any pressure now...

I have a few things to do today and then I plan on heading down to snap some pics. Keep me posted, Chris. Meet up today maybe?

*On the "bright side", I might get a free day off from work tom. The area around my building is flooded and it doesn't look like the waters will reced until later tomorrow.

Thanks a lot, SJPhillyBoy!!!!
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  #253  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2004, 8:18 PM
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i just took a walk across the harvey taylor and along the riverfront. i got about 40 pictures. some are really cool. i even got some of the blackhawk and chinook army national guard helicopters that were over the city and river. i think they were looking for someone in the water.

Dave, i'm going to run errands until like 6. if you are going to go out after that, i can meet up with you. if not, i have the next week and a half off from doing military stuff. so maybe we can meet some time then. my cell is 717-580-8891.
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  #254  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2004, 4:03 AM
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Hey Chris, a friend and I went down there but it was pretty late so I didn't call you. I will get in touch with you before you leave, though. We have got to meet up before you leave again!!! The fact that I met two forumers from OH recently and still haven't met you is not good.

I cannot believe how high the river is!!! Also, I could not believe how many people were down there for how late it was. There was a pretty large chunk of embankment that came down too along riverfront park. The cleanup is going to be a mess, that's for sure...
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  #255  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2004, 4:08 AM
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harrisburger, what's your schedule like? We should do an HBG forumer meet before Chris leaves again. We could check out all the damage after the water recedes or something...
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  #256  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2004, 6:15 AM
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it's cool Dave...we'll get together sometime soon. whenever you get some free time, just let me know. i don't have much going on right now. Harrisburg, find some free time and come chill with us
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  #257  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2004, 2:47 AM
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hmm....i'm free tuesday early evening, wednesday early evening and friday evening....i have volleyball on wednesday night, and going to the movies tuesday night....i'm actually going to harrisburg on friday for some neato burrito and putt putt on city island if it's open...
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  #258  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2004, 3:45 AM
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Study steers clear of suggestion by Penbrook officials
Traffic solution sits at red light


Monday, September 20, 2004
BY MARY KLAUS
Of The Patriot-News

No one seems to dispute the fact that little Penbrook has big traffic problems.

What is in dispute is how to fix those problems.

Penbrook -- which measures half a square mile and has nearly 2,800 residents -- has a dwindling business district that some blame on the borough's bumper-to-bumper traffic and lack of parking.

Walnut Street, Penbrook's main thoroughfare, lies in the middle of the 21/2-mile stretch between the state Capitol and Progress Avenue. That route gets 46,730 vehicles a day, said Diane Myers-Krug, transportation planner for the Tri-County Regional Planning Commission.

Two traffic studies involving Walnut Street are planned.

The first, a $1.3 million preliminary engineering study of the Walnut Street and Progress Avenue intersection in Susquehanna Twp., is a local initiative between the township and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, said James Szymborski, Tri-County Regional Planning Commission executive director.

The Tri-County Regional Planning Commission decides which midstate road projects are built. Szymborski said Susquehanna Twp. will pay $600,000 for the study and Dauphin County will pay $700,000.

The second study is a $100,000 Walnut Street-Route 22 corridor study including Harrisburg, Penbrook, Susquehanna Twp. and Lower Paxton Twp.

Szymborski said this study will be funded by an $80,000 federal grant, a $10,000 state Department of Economic Development grant and $2,500 from each of the four municipalities.

All municipalities except Harrisburg have come up with their $2,500. Dan Leppo, Harrisburg Department of Building & Housing Development deputy director for planning, said, "No money has been budgeted for it. I'm searching for money for the city's share."

Some Penbrook residents believe Penbrook should be included in the Susquehanna Twp. intersection study. Some residents say they feel "blindsided" that the Harrisburg Area Transportation Study did not agree or accept Penbrook's suggested solution.

James M. Armbruster, Penbrook Planning Commission chairman, said Penbrook's option involves making Herr Street in the borough one way. The option also calls for diverting westbound traffic from Walnut Street onto Herr Street, decreasing Walnut Street from four lanes to three with one westbound and two eastbound, and replacing parking on Walnut Street with parking in other areas.

Walnut Street is four lanes wide, with parking on alternate sides of the street.

In June, Jacquelyn Patton, president of the Susquehanna Twp. Board of Commissioners, wrote to Szymborski that the township engineer would include evaluation of Penbrook's option in the Susquehanna Twp. intersection study.

Harrisburg Mayor Stephen R. Reed said he favors including the Penbrook alternative in the Walnut Street corridor study. Szymborski agreed.

"The two studies are linked," he said. "But we believe the best place for Penbrook's alternative is in the entire corridor study not the intersection study. The two studies can be conducted concurrently."

Borough resident Dr. Scott Leedy told Borough Council that's not acceptable.

"We were told lies," Leedy said, referring to Patton's letter. He said, "Susquehanna Twp. officials even came to our township and saw we were willing to spend the money to have that included in the study."

Gary Myers, Susquehanna Twp. manager, said the intersection "has been failing for a while. We need to reconstruct it.

"The study, which HATS authorized, will take 18 months," Myers said. "After we choose an option, we will be four to five years away from construction. There will be plenty of time for input, including from Penbrook."

State Rep. Mark McNaughton, R-Dauphin, who attended the HATS meeting, prefers Penbrook in the Walnut Street corridor study "because the intersection study is of limited scope." He said that both studies later can be combined "in a master plan."

MARY KLAUS: 255-8113 or mklaus@patriot-news.com
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  #259  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2004, 3:47 AM
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Gala marks 75 years of orchestra
Harrisburg unit growing, director says


Monday, September 20, 2004
BY BARRY FOX
Of The Patriot-News
A couple of blocks away, the Susquehanna River was spilling its banks, but at the Hilton Harrisburg & Towers the show went on.

With evening gowns and tuxedos -- rather than boots and hip waders -- the fashion of the evening, the Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra's 75th anniversary gala, persevered in the best show-business tradition.

About 450 people enjoyed dinner, a silent auction and a performance by music director Stuart Malina and "Broadway Friends."

"There are older orchestras but not many regional orchestras this old and this sturdy," Malina said before the program began. "The great thing about this anniversary is that we're not marking something in decline, but in ascension."

As guests sipped wine and ate cheese, listened to a youth symphony string quartet and perused the jewelry for sale, WITF 89.5 FM's Ellen Hughes credited Malina with making the orchestra such a vibrant entity.

"With Stuart [Malina] and [executive director] Jeff Woodruff, the symphony is on the most positive imaginable course for the future," she said. "It's one, if not the most important institutions we have. What regional orchestras have become and how they have evolved has been typified by the Harrisburg Symphony."

Lt. Gov. Catherine Baker Knoll read a proclamation honoring the orchestra for its 75 years. During a video history of the orchestra, Mayor Stephen R. Reed declared Sept. 19, 2004, "Harrisburg Symphony 75th Anniversary Day."

The orchestra played its first concert on March 19, 1931, at William Penn High School.

That first season, subscriptions cost $2 and the musicians were paid 50 cents for each rehearsal and $3.50 for a performance.

Roberta Peters, Awadagin Pratt, Aaron Copland, Emmanuel Ax, Yo-Yo Ma and Vincent Price are among the guest artists who have performed with the orchestra in its 386 concerts.

Examining that history "is a chance to take a look back at what we've been and what we're becoming artistically and financially," said Odin Rathnam, the orchestra's concertmaster. "It's a celebration of a living, breathing organism that is a young 75."

That youthful, energetic spirit makes the Harrisburg orchestra attractive to world-class musicians such as trumpeter Phil Snedecor, who performed with Malina at last night's event, along with fellow trumpeter Scott Sabo and Broadway veterans Marc Kudisch and Shannon Lewis.

"A lot of symphonies struggle, but Harrisburg is struggling to grow, not struggling to survive," Snedecor said. "That's why my colleagues and I find it so much fun to play here."

Snedecor, who has played with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and is in the National Symphony Orchestra, said those well-established organizations lack the "electricity" he feels working with Malina and the orchestra's other players.

"I'm taking weeks away from National to come here, because it means enough to me to do it," he said. "And, that says something about this organization."

BARRY FOX: 255-8225 or bfox@patriot-news.com
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  #260  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2004, 9:59 PM
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Originally Posted by harrisburger
hmm....i'm free tuesday early evening, wednesday early evening and friday evening....i have volleyball on wednesday night, and going to the movies tuesday night....i'm actually going to harrisburg on friday for some neato burrito and putt putt on city island if it's open...
I doubt it will be open, harrisburger. City Island got pretty f'd up in the flood and the mini golf course probably needs some major rehab now (I would imagine it is caked with mud). And with how short the remainder of the season is, I doubt they will bother much with it this year and reopen it.

Let's try to schedule something soon, okay guys? I am out for tonight (leaving in a few minutes in fact) but the rest of my weeknights are open as of now. Any suggestions? WE MUST MEET before Chris leaves again!!!

Thanks for the articles, Chris. I recently watched a short story on the HBG Symphony, and I must say I am impressed. There are cities much bigger then ours don't even have what we have!!!

As for Walnut St., yeah, BIG MESS that should've been taken care of long before our traffic reached the levels they are at today. If Penbrook really wants to bring back their DT, and they seem pretty serious about it, then the solution is not going to be an easy one. I can't wait to see what PennDOT dreams up with this one...
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Right before your eyes you're victimized, guys, that's the world of today, and it ain't civilized...
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