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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 4:10 PM
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Historic Maps - Towns & Cities of Canada

Ok Map Nerds, feast your eyes on this collection:

http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_a...ec_nbr=3810187

It's not the best internet interface but you can expand the province of interest to you and browse the maps.


Bay & King, Toronto c. 1912
Library and Archives Canada Copyright: Expired

Other cool stuff available under "Special Surveys" include drawings of things such as Grain Elevators:


CPR Elevator D, Fort William (Thunder Bay) c. 1909
Library and Archives Canada Copyright: Expired
... sorry for the size...
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  #2  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 4:24 PM
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Some Calgary Stuff

http://calgarypubliclibrary.com/Medi...-City-Plan.jpg


This one shows the direct link from "Camp Sarcee" (reserve, now Tsuu Tina) right into downtown Calgary. We had a good trade history with the first nations people and a friendly dialogue.
http://www.reocities.com/ResearchTri...rabmsl1926.jpg


Calgary history of annexation:
http://s15.photobucket.com/user/jess...e_map.jpg.html


Calgary 1962
http://i248.photobucket.com/albums/g...ryarea1962.jpg


Calgary 1960
http://reocities.com/researchtriangl...rabmgc1960.jpg
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 4:30 PM
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A map of St. John's showing the extent (in orange) of the destruction as a result of the Great Fire of 1846. This was the second-most extensive fire in the history of the city and would only be surpassed by the Great Fire of 1892, which destroyed approximately three times as much as is shown in this map.


Memorial University of Newfoundland Archives

The city was sacked and put to the torch several times throughout its history, but only when it was much smaller. However, in 1762, it was conquered by the French for the final time. The French military was ordered to sack the city but their commanders in the field refused.
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 4:43 PM
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Saint John, NB

Courtesy: mapas.owje.com
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 4:52 PM
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"The destructive effects of automobiles are much less a cause than a symptom of our incompetence at city building" - Jane Jacobs 1961ish

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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 6:06 PM
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Interesting topic, I suppose I'm a minor map nerd. I've posted these maps before in a Winnipeg thread, years back. They are 105 and 93 years old, respectively.

From the Manitoba Historical Society's website: http://www.mhs.mb.ca/data/census/1911/winnipeg/


Waghorn’s Guide Map of Winnipeg, 1908. (with street index)

Chataway’s Map of Greater Winnipeg, c1920


The maps are pretty large, so without the knowledge of how to resize them for forum posting, I'll just post the above links.
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 6:14 PM
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"The destructive effects of automobiles are much less a cause than a symptom of our incompetence at city building" - Jane Jacobs 1961ish

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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 8:08 PM
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Toronto in 1818 ("York" at the time). At this point it was 25 years old but still little more than a village, with a population of about 1,000.



Larger (pdf)



1827. Population at this time would've been about 2,000-3,000.



Larger



1842



Larger


1851. Population 30,000 (about 90% of whom were Irish), by this point it had become the third-largest city in the country.



Larger


1876 bird's eye view. At this point it was rapidly industrializing and had become Canada's second-largest city.



Larger


1892 bird's eye view & streetcar map.



Larger


1892 map of the city & newly developing suburbs, with the beltline railway (not all of these areas were necessarily built up at that point though).



Larger


1898, showing city boundaries. Population approximately 230,000.



Larger


1920s, showing municipal & ward boundaries. Note that at this point, the harbour has been filled in.





All of the above maps (along with many more) with the exception of the last one, came from here: http://oldtorontomaps.blogspot.ca/p/index-of-maps.html



Also came across this interactive Google Maps-style map of Toronto from 1858: http://zoom.it/SSOg#full
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 8:25 PM
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The original post is the best collection of fire insurance maps I have seen! They are by far the best (and only?) way to truly get a grasp of what was actually built in our cities back then. Most street maps (as noted by Monkeyronin above) showed streets that in reality were nothing more than lines on a map.
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 8:42 PM
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Last edited by Darkoshvilli; Aug 16, 2013 at 12:25 AM.
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  #11  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 9:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkoshvilli View Post
Amazing how the "seminaire" shown on this map is still standing to this day.
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2013, 10:54 PM
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Old Posted Aug 16, 2013, 1:16 AM
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  #14  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2013, 3:37 AM
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I've put lots of my old maps (mainly Winnipeg and Manitoba but also others) on my Flickr site, as well as a sampling of my postcard collection. I've recently moved my (new) postcards to Ipernity.com however, since they wrecked Flickr. I'm 'wintorbos' there as well, if you want to say hi.


Manitoba Provincial Highway Map 1944-45 (Winnipeg and area) by wintorbos, on Flickr


Lake Superior 1887 by wintorbos, on Flickr


Winnipeg City Centre 1907 (Baedeker) by wintorbos, on Flickr


Dominion of Canada, 1882, with inset showing Ellis map of 1748 by wintorbos, on Flickr


Quebec City street plan 1908 (part) by wintorbos, on Flickr


Hathaway's Map of Winnipeg (1911) Downtown and North End by wintorbos, on Flickr


Manitoba Provincial Trunk Highways Map, 1930 by wintorbos, on Flickr

The last one is from the second edition of the Manitoba highways map. I think I have the first edition as well, somewhere. I was trying to collect the whole series of annual provincial highway map. The prewar maps are very hard to find. I also have a Trans-Canada Highway Association map from the mid-1920s, showing one of the two 'Trans-Canada Highway' routes through western Canada. That one I believe is very rare. I mostly stopped collecting maps a few years ago in favour of postcards. I have some of those Goad's fire insurance maps of Toronto as well -- the first one in Tony's post. You can buy those at D&E Lake in Toronto (around $200 apiece and up though). If you like maps and are in Toronto, even for a visit, you need to visit that shop.
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Old Posted Aug 18, 2013, 3:50 PM
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I'd like to mention two map collections relating to Toronto that are sister projects to the one linked by MonkeyRonin. They're useful for researchers interested in specific areas of the city.

The two sites are:
Goad"s Atlas of Toronto—Online
This is a collection of Goad Atlases for Toronto, for the years 1884, 1890, 1893, 1899, 1903, 1910, 1913, and 1924, as well as the Insurance Plan for Toronto for 1880 and 1889.



and

Fort York and Garrison Common Maps
A collaboration with the Friends of Fort York, this (ongoing) project visually examines, using maps, the complex changes in use and ownership of Fort York and the surrounding ~1,000 acres of Military Reserve. Some of these maps have not been previously digitized or available online.


Last edited by nate88; Aug 18, 2013 at 3:53 PM. Reason: grammar
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Old Posted Aug 18, 2013, 4:50 PM
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Moncton in 1878:



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  #17  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2013, 5:42 PM
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Nice. What was the circular building in the middle of town? Seems out of place in the midst of all the Gothic churches and Victorian factories.
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Old Posted Aug 18, 2013, 5:51 PM
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Where do you guys get these birds eye maps?
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  #19  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2013, 5:58 PM
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Quote:
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Nice. What was the circular building in the middle of town? Seems out of place in the midst of all the Gothic churches and Victorian factories.
Believe it or not, that was an indoor skating rink, which seems pretty exotic for the 1870's
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Old Posted Aug 18, 2013, 6:11 PM
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Fredericton in 1882



www.archives.gnb.ca
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