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  #20241  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2014, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post

As the route of Beverly Boulevard developed from downtown via Temple and First, there was already a Beverly Boulevard in Beverly Hills... that road's extension westward from BH became Sunset Boulevard in 1934... not sure when the Beverly within BH--not today's four blocks if it within the city limits but another road to the north--became Sunset, tying in with L.A.'s Sunset coming from the east and completing that road all the way to the ocean.

LAT June 23, 1934
Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post

1927
I've highlighted Beverly Boulevard west of Beverly Hills as it appeared on this 1928 map. As GW's LA Times article suggests, it is now Sunset Boulevard. In 1928, the start of Sunset is marked near the right of the map below.

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  #20242  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 1:55 AM
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I was searching the thread for pictures of the Farmers Market the other day when I spotted the unrelated picture below, originally posted back on page 34.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Below: The corner of 3rd & Beaudry in 1948.


California State Library
When I looked closer, I realized that the Tanner Motor Livery Co. building is there in the background. Here's a reminder of how the building looked in 1927:


USC Digital Library

Here's what the corner of 3rd and Beaudry looks like today:


GSV

Previous posts on the Tanner Motor Livery Co,:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17942

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17954

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17971

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17989
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  #20243  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 5:15 AM
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Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
I wonder how many people would show up for an air race today? When I was four years old it was the greatest joy to see a steam engine train pull in to the station. All of that seems so quaint today.

In the photo above we see thousands of people mesmerized to see these slow moving planes fly by.

My grandmother used to tell of the thrill of riding in an automobile in 1910.
Hell, that sounds like it would be cool to see even now, and I'm in my fifties. As a matter of fact even watching the northbound Amtrak appear around the bend as it pulled into Del Mar station was memorable way back when.

Although today we have a lot more passenger trains making the run, Del Mar station is, regrettably, closed--succeeded but not replaced by the new Solana Beach station.
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  #20244  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 5:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Flyingwedge View Post
Is this the LACC near Pico and Western? What streets are we looking at? Could you please provide the link to this photo?
The LACC was and is located on either side of Wilshire about a mile west the intersection with Santa Monica, so it really was out in the country at one time.

I seem to remember having read there was some other country club at one time located near Pico and Western; if memory serves this club still exists but not at that location.
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  #20245  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 2:26 PM
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Plebeian menu food....

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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post





We've seen the Los Feliz Derby here before, but I don't think we've seen its menu...
I smile when I read these old menus. I suspect a lot of young people do not realize it but a ''Peanut butter and Jelly" sandwich was a common menu item in the 1940s.

Also, eating in your car at a ''Drive-In" was novel back in the day. There are still a few around in 2014 but they're very rare.

I guess the ''Drive-Thru'' has taken over. My research seems to indicate that people would rather get their meals at the window and be on their way.

In the photo below we see some way cool Anchor Hocking barrel tumbler water glasses. I see them as a symbol of the noir era.


http://img0.foodservicewarehouse.com...king_5054U.jpg


LAPL

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Mar 16, 2014 at 2:39 PM.
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  #20246  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 3:30 PM
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Aug. 1, 1981: Atomic Cafe at 1st and Alameda streets in Los Angeles.
(LATIMES.COM)



(GSV - hosted by me)

Quote:
Buildings slated for tear-down were rich part of Little Tokyo history
Metro plans to raze two single-story buildings at 1st and Alameda streets for a new subway station.

By David Zahniser

March 15, 2014, 7:17 p.m.

Nearly a decade ago, Enrique Ramirez welcomed the opening of a light-rail station in Little Tokyo, just a quick walk from his Mexican seafood restaurant.

The Metro Gold Line station delivered a steady stream of customers to Senor Fish, especially on weekends. But now, with the region's rail system expanding again, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is pushing him out.

On Saturday, Senor Fish abandoned its location at the corner of 1st and Alameda streets. And later this year, Metro is set to demolish the property's two brick buildings, which are located across the street from the Japanese American National Museum and have played an important role in the cultural life of the neighborhood for decades.

In the 1990s, the restaurant building was home to the Troy Cafe, a coffeehouse that showcased indie rock bands, cabaret acts, jazz trios and the enigmatic singer-songwriter Beck — son of one of the cafe's owners. Prior to that, it was the Atomic Cafe, a favorite after-hours hangout for musicians, artists and writers.

Nancy Sekizawa, or "Atomic Nancy," made sure the jukebox played the 45s of local punk bands. She said her patrons included Debbie Harry of Blondie, the female rock band the Go-Gos and David Byrne of the Talking Heads, who ordered egg foo yung and a glass of milk.

The rear building once housed the Weiland Brewery, which had a warehouse and offices on the site more than a century ago, said Robert Volk, whose family owned the property for more than 130 years. That part of downtown had multiple breweries at the time.

"The story [of the property] touches so many different lives and crosses so many histories and ethnicities and generations here in Little Tokyo," said Remy de la Peza, senior planner with the Little Tokyo Service Center, which is helping to document the site's history. "So we're sad that that physical space is going to be gone."

Metro went to court to obtain the property from Volk using eminent domain last year, forcing the removal of Senor Fish and two other businesses — a pub with the Weiland name and the Asian restaurant Spice Table. The other two closed last year.

The site is needed, officials say, for a new subway station that will be part of the $1.4-billion Regional Connector. When the 1.9-mile line opens in 2020, it will link the Metro Blue and Gold Lines, allowing commuters to avoid changing trains. A judge paved the way for Metro to take possession of the land last month, said agency spokesman Rick Jager.

Metro's decision to raze the two buildings — both modest, one-story brick structures, one dating back at least to 1898 — has triggered waves of nostalgia for those who spent time in the neighborhood.

Volk's great-uncle, James. M. Davies, bought the property when it was surrounded by vineyards. At that time, the nearby Los Angeles River regularly overflowed into the neighborhood, said Greg Fischer, who was hired by Volk to research the property. Volk himself became active in the neighborhood's civic groups, serving on the board of the Japanese American National Museum.

"I really feel so much a part of Little Tokyo," he said.

Much of the research on the site has focused on the Atomic Cafe, which was opened in 1946 by Minoru Matoba and his wife, Ito. The diner was forced to move repeatedly — it left one spot so Parker Center, the old Los Angeles Police Department headquarters, could be built — and settled at 1st and Alameda in 1961. More than a decade later Sekizawa, their daughter, took over.

Atomic Nancy, a huge fan of the punk scene, made her parents' eatery the place to go once the downtown clubs let out at 2 a.m. "I dressed the part," said Sekizawa, now 60 and an addiction counselor. "I dressed in Kabuki makeup, with hair teased up, dyed hair. I had all the waitresses do the same. It was part of the attraction."

Sekizawa and her family closed the place in 1989. A year later the Troy Cafe opened in the same building, offering downtown patrons a coffeehouse similar to Onyx in Los Feliz and the Espresso Bar in Pasadena.

That space proved to be a draw for patrons from East L.A. and some Chicano performers, including the band Quetzal, which had its first performance there, said Sean Carrillo, one of the owners. Beck washed dishes and made coffee, not long before he broke through with his song "Loser."

By the time Troy Cafe closed in 1995, Senor Fish was up and running a few doors down. That establishment, part of a small restaurant chain, built up its own fan base. On Friday, customer Paul Garcia estimated he and his wife had eaten there more than 100 times — and used the space for the after-party of their wedding.

"We built relationships coming here," said Garcia's wife, Mayela, as their 9-month-old daughter, Ally, nursed her bottle.

The Garcias plan to follow Senor Fish to its new location at 7th and Mateo streets. De La Peza is excited that the planned Metro station will acknowledge the story of the Atomic and Troy cafes. And Carrillo, who now lives in New York, said he has no problem with a building that once housed Troy coming down. After all, the city needs more rail transit, he said.

"That's the thing about L.A. It constantly tears itself down," he said. "The building has been here a long time. It's a great building. And it's done its job."

david.zahniser@latimes.com
http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-0...,2639911.story

Last edited by Lwize; Mar 16, 2014 at 3:50 PM.
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  #20247  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 3:39 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post



Another shot of Beverly meets Fairfax? Was everyone aware that there was a Grove Market in '31 at this location?

West of the BF intersection, looking east. A continuation of the Miniature Golf Craze. http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=13536 and http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=13569

1931 - http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...d/17409/rec/16























Vestigial Oil Derrick?






Richfield at North Edinburgh Ave. and Beverly Blvd. - look carefully and you will see another advertising statue. http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=7727








As the miniature golf craze ebbed . . . Fairfax Greens became Merlo's. Not clear whether Yale Market was raised or incorporated as part of the Merlo's structure.

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=9466 )

http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics33/00066387.jpg

Last edited by Tourmaline; Mar 16, 2014 at 5:47 PM.
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  #20248  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 3:41 PM
Retired_in_Texas Retired_in_Texas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug View Post
I smile when I read these old menus. I suspect a lot of young people do not realize it but a ''Peanut butter and Jelly" sandwich was a common menu item in the 1940s.

Also, eating in your car at a ''Drive-In" was novel back in the day. There are still a few around in 2014 but they're very rare.

I guess the ''Drive-Thru'' has taken over. My research seems to indicate that people would rather get their meals at the window and be on their way.

In the photo below we see some way cool Anchor Hocking barrel tumbler water glasses. I see them as a symbol of the noir era.


http://img0.foodservicewarehouse.com...king_5054U.jpg


LAPL
I think that Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwiches as a menu item anywhere had pretty much gone bye-bye by 1960, making anyone that remembers them being on the menu pretty much on their way to being an Old Geezer. LOL

Loved those old Anchor Hocking barrel tumbler water glasses that were used by restaurants everywhere. However today if they were still used in curb service people would be taking them home instead of leaving them on the tray. They even went bye-bye in sit down restaurants by the mid 1960s. Last one's I recall seeing was in the student center snack bar at TCU around 1963.

There are still quite a number of dine in your car drive-in restaurants around. One good example is the SONIC chain. They seem to do a great job of competing with the likes of McDonald's, Burger King, and Jack in the Box. Then there are still quite a number of throw backs to the 1950s around in small towns around the country, when going to the drive-in burger joint was a social event for many teenagers. This one is an example and was Elvis Presley's favorite place when he was stationed at Ft. Hood Texas. Their web site is more or less horrible but take the time to watch the video, it's interesting. Then check out the individual locations. http://www.stormsrestaurants.com/#!


Last edited by Retired_in_Texas; Mar 16, 2014 at 4:37 PM.
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  #20249  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 3:54 PM
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Mayhem at Beverly and Rosemont



USCDL Dated Sept 22, 1951

GSV

LAT Dec 10, 1950


In the '80s, the building housed the California School of Professional Psychology (as opposed to Amateur?); it now appears to be the Praise Christian Fellowship Foursquare Church. I suppose the lettering at top of the building in the early shots was "BCS"...?
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  #20250  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 4:02 PM
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Alwaysmore Gilmore...




A December 8, 1951, fire at Rand's Beverly Round Up, which turns out was just east of Herbert's at the SE corner of Beverly & Fairfax.

Boston Public Library

We've seen this card before in BRR's round-up of Rand's Round Ups in post #13392


As seen before in Chuckaluck's prior post #20178

cbstelevisioncity.com/
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  #20251  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 4:52 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post
Anybody recognize the car? Looks like an American Austin, but I don't think they made a four door.

Cheers,

Earl


I am certain there are far better car spotters on the board, but the door handle placement , wheels, spare tire-in the front fender, and overall shape suggests to me that this is not an Austin-4.



34 Austin 10-4
http://classiccarcatalogue.com/A/aus...10-4saloon.jpg

Not having spend much time considering this, could it have been something from the Dodge-Plymouth family?
http://www.ply33.com/models/PD/images/rr20001227b.jpeg

http://4-photos7.ebizautos.com/used-...65-28-1024.jpg
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  #20252  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 4:53 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
Is something missing?









Wikipedia is a good resource yet its current history of the New Beverly Cinema is either inaccurate or incomplete. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Beverly_Cinema It currently states:
"The building began life as a vaudeville theater, hosting acts such as Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Jackie Gleason, Phil Silvers, and others. Later, the theater was converted into a nightclub called Slapsy Maxie's, named after the boxer and silent film actor Maxie Rosenbloom."
No mention of "Colvin's Beverly Winery?"

There is little doubt the building spent the majority of its life as an entertainment venue, but this picture makes clear that wine sales was one of many hats it has worn. With its open air facade, it is a strong hunch that the building started out as a retail establishment and most probably a neighborhood bodega, like so many other open air markets in the vicinity. That is not to say several transformations were not possible, considering the nearby Cantor's and Bethel Presbyterian Church conversions from theaters. But a purpose-built middle-of-the-block small venue seems to have been bucking the trend of larger movie houses in the late 20's early 30's when, I am guessing, the building was erected. (the NB Cinema = 300 seats http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/1156; Esquire Theater/Canter's = 500 seats http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/2358 Fox La Brea/Bethel Church = 900 seats http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/2293). Note the two distinct facades in the '34 picture, suggesting, at the time, it may have been intended to house two different business at the location, similar to today. (Colvin's appears to be using both addresses - until the wine sells out. ) There are also a couple of interior photos, but it is not clear if they are of the structure know known as the NB Cinema or its neighbor to the east. The open beams may suggest the building was finished more as a retail warehouse than a place for theatrical exhibition. Again, this is pure conjecture and given the economic climate in '34, there is probably a far more interesting back story to the building.



Interior shots show wooden beams above displays. Makeshift storage support or display window dressing?










Is $1/barrel wine enough for a double feature at the Wiltern? Muscatel or Port for Capra, Runyon, Warner Williams? Forget your troubles . . . get happy? Wrong movie.







http://img.rakuten.com/PIC/5407769/0/1/500/5407769.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-cNKhew5QhP...+For+a+Day.jpg
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  #20253  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 5:02 PM
Lwize Lwize is offline
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Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
Is something missing?

Decor like that is always removed in LA renovations for earthquake safety. It's like someone took a pallet knife and scraped the tops of all the old buildings around the city.
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  #20254  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 5:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post
Anybody recognize the car? Looks like an American Austin, but I don't think they made a four door.
Cheers,
Earl
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
I am certain there are far better car spotters on the board, but the door handle placement , wheels, spare tire-in the front fender, and overall shape suggests to me that this is not an Austin-4.



http://4-photos7.ebizautos.com/used-...65-28-1024.jpg

It's a '34 Plymouth... you are very close, Tourmaline. The pic above is a '33.
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  #20255  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 6:02 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lwize View Post
Decor like that is always removed in LA renovations for earthquake safety. It's like someone took a pallet knife and scraped the tops of all the old buildings around the city.
I was focusing more on the blank area that often bears the name of the business, the building, or the date of construction (bottom). Considering the early '30s economy, this could be a clue that the original or current occupant was not long term.







TD Mott - 1885 - S. Main Street, between 1st and 2nd streets.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00078/00078687.jpg
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  #20256  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 6:19 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
It's a '34 Plymouth... you are very close, Tourmaline. The pic above is a '33.

Unable to quickly locate a '34 sedan with the front fender spare. Too much of Colvin's wine may have affected my vision and my ability to play miniature golf.


http://www.mecum.com/auctions/FL0111...1-102222_1.jpg

http://gomotors.net/pics/Plymouth/pl...-door-06.jpg?i

http://gomotors.net/photos/79/0f/fil...le_b3a6e.jpg?i

Last edited by Tourmaline; Mar 16, 2014 at 8:05 PM.
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  #20257  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 6:38 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Alwaysmore Gilmore...




A December 8, 1951, fire at Rand's Beverly Round Up, which turns out was just east of Herbert's at the SE corner of Beverly & Fairfax.

Boston Public Library

We've seen this card before in BRR's round-up of Rand's Round Ups in post #13392


As seen before in Chuckaluck's prior post #20178

Thought that was just a normal "smoke out" for the Farifax Theater's late-night crowd. Watching certain films can make an audience "powerful hungry."

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-8E2uqwpty3...he+Saddle2.jpg


One of your aerial's also depicts the asked-about Standard Gas Station on the NE corner of the same intersection. Also drawn to the formation of parked cars at the Drive In. Maybe it was street sweeping day, or more probably cars were parked conveniently closest to an exit or nearby business.
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  #20258  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 6:49 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Regarding my observations of Colvin's Beverly Winery and the NB Cinema, I noticed this "seemingly" small neighborhood theater in Eagle Rock. Can't recall seeing it on NLA. Per Cinema Treasures, exteriors can be deceptive as this facade hid 900 seats. Source indicates several remodels and current use as . . . a church.



4884 Eagle Rock Blvd. (Early-mid '70s?)
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics49/00044199.jpg
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  #20259  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 7:20 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-U_7YkiL-jB.../aaawatch9.jpg

The stills from "Liberty" are said to have been shot at the Western Costume Co. 935 S Broadway. I was remiss in not mentioning previous discussion here: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=13189 where it was said that there was a set built atop of the building. Since the Western Costume Building was said to be complete by '20, this makes sense, although I must say the girders look quite realistic.
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics08/00013684.jpg



This caused me to happen upon one of the numerous shots from the Chamber of Commerce Building. This one features mostly-silent screen actress, Dorothy Dwan. She had some 40 films to her credit, including a few brushes with Messrs Laurel and Hardy.


LA Chamber of Commerce Building. 1151 S. Broadway - built in '24, unbuilt in '68.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00078/00078705.jpg

1930 - Unidentified woman with cardboard butterflies
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics34/00066836.jpg

Seems apropos to include Saving Sam.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post

Pep Boys and Felix Chevrolet had their cartoon representatives. Western Auto Supply had its own: "Saving Sam." Wonder if the character was based upon a real person. Could it have been based on Western Auto's long-time founder and President, George Pepperdine? Doubtful, . . . different hairline (?)


1100 Grand Ave - Pre '26.
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...id/22360/rec/6

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...id/22360/rec/6

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...23466/rec/2225

[/url]http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...5/id/933/rec/1

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...5/id/933/rec/1

Last edited by Tourmaline; Mar 16, 2014 at 9:09 PM.
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  #20260  
Old Posted Mar 16, 2014, 10:19 PM
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A postcard of both the Zephyr Room nightclub and the Wilshire Brown Derby.

ebay

I have no idea why it's so rare to see the two of them together since they were right across the street (Alexandria Avenue) from each other.



from way back on page 81.


To see the art deco interior of the Zephyr Room go here.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=1611

Here's my first post on the Chapman Park Hotel and Bungalows that includes the Zephyr Room.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=1610

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 17, 2014 at 12:50 AM.
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