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  #121  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2018, 10:59 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by StethJeff View Post
There was a thread back in the day that detailed the history and woes of San Bernardino, California. The city was projected to be a major anchor of the Southern California metro. Instead, it mostly fell on hard times with a bad economy, high crime, high unemployment.
Smog may have played a role in the decline. The eastern San Bernardino Valley until recent decades used to have horrible smog during summer and fall, much worse than the coastal areas of L.A. and Orange counties, where prevailing winds off the ocean blow the pollutants inland, where it is trapped by a mountain barrier. The air is improved, but many days still exceed the smog limits. The same is true of Central Valley, where pollutants from the Bay Area are driven by ocean winds into the Valley. Summers are also terribly hot.
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  #122  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2018, 10:02 AM
Miu Miu is offline
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Ditto Berlin. In terms of built form, Berlin is a clear number four among Western cities IMO. Feels like a city that could/should have 7 or 8 million people.

Vienna is an odd one IMO. The grandeur of its architecture is almost unmatched, but the actual retail core is tiny by Western European standards.
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  #123  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2018, 11:41 AM
Crawford Crawford is offline
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Originally Posted by Miu View Post
Vienna is an odd one IMO. The grandeur of its architecture is almost unmatched, but the actual retail core is tiny by Western European standards.
Much of Vienna's prime shopping is actually outside of the tourist center, though. The Mariahilferstrasse, outside the Ring, is where Viennese typically shop. Kärntner Strasse, in the core, is more for tourists.
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  #124  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2018, 9:02 PM
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yuriandrade yuriandrade is offline
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Originally Posted by Miu View Post
Ditto Berlin. In terms of built form, Berlin is a clear number four among Western cities IMO. Feels like a city that could/should have 7 or 8 million people.

Vienna is an odd one IMO. The grandeur of its architecture is almost unmatched, but the actual retail core is tiny by Western European standards.
If I'm not mistaken at some point they were the 3rd and the 4th largest cities of the world (excluded eastern Asia).
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  #125  
Old Posted Oct 27, 2018, 9:42 PM
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Austin55 Austin55 is offline
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In Texas,

Galveston was the largest city in the state in the 1850, 1870, and 1880 census. It had more population in 1940 than today. The city was basically wiped off the map by the hurricane and has not recovered over 100 years later. I'm not sure what it would have looked like today, but I imagine very different.

Waco was comparable in Size to Austin from 1880-1940, when Austin took off and has continued to do so. Waco had the states tallest building and biggest bridge around 1910. It just never really caught up to itself.

Similar situation in Beaumont, which was larger than Austin for a while.

Perhaps an argument can be made for San Antonio, which, since 1850, has been in the top 3 largest Texas cities, but never had the recognition (or urbanization or skyscraperization) of Dallas or Houston.
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  #126  
Old Posted Oct 31, 2018, 3:25 AM
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xzmattzx xzmattzx is offline
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This is smaller in scope, but Delaware City, Delaware, was supposed to rival Wilmington, and even Philadelphia, being on the eastern terminus of the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, which opened in 1829. The streets are absurdly wide even to this day due to projections of booming times. Instead, the canal that cut down shipping and travel time between Philadelphia and Baltimore was almost immediately made obsolete by one of the first railroads in the US, with the New Castle & Frenchtown Railroad beginning service across the Delmarva Peninsula in 1831. (The second-oldest railroad station in the US is in New Castle.) The railroad's eastern terminus was New Castle, of course, which meant that New Castle maintained its status at the time as the most important city in New Castle County (and was later supplanted by Wilmington).
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