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  #81  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2018, 8:03 PM
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Put me down as another fan of the Château Champlain. I find it's aged very well and is still very much a chic place.

It also has a pretty cool cabaret theatre in the basement called the Caf' Conc'.

https://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&t....0.vQ-u2ln4_Ec
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  #82  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2018, 8:09 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
There's no question that it's a product of its time, but at the same time it has aged fairly well. The panels don't look tired or worn out, and certainly the hotel still caters to the same high-ish end business clientele that it always did. The design looks original and fresh, as it did in the 1960s.
This is not quite what I meant. It does not look like it is falling apart. I was speculating more abstractly about the precast cladding construction technique and how it might have looked more impressive or unique back in the 1960's.

It is a kind of curse that if you pioneer a new approach to construction that turns out to work well you will be copied in the future and your original creation will stand out less. If you build something impractical you are less likely to be copied and you may have created a landmark but not had the same impact. The most popular historic buildings that non-architecture-enthusiasts notice are often late exemplars of well-defined styles, not the pioneer buildings.

The curves do give it a bit of that space age distinction that differentiates it from low end buildings from 1982.
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  #83  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2018, 8:21 PM
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^ I get what you're saying, the 'wow factor' of the precast panels is long gone. It's a bit like looking at high fashion from the 1960s made with then-new synthetic fibres.
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  #84  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2018, 8:21 PM
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I randomly just found out this fact.


The InterContinental Toronto Centre, is a hotel in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It is part of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre complex on Front Street West in the former Railway Lands. The hotel operations are run by InterContinental Hotels.

Formerly L'Hotel, the hotel was built by the Canadian National Railway in 1984. The modernistic concrete-clad hotel was the last hotel built for Canadian National Hotels and built on part of the former CN railway lands that was supposed to be part of the Metro Centre development (only the CN Tower was built). It was operated by Canadian National Hotels from 1984 to 1988, when that chain merged with Canadian Pacific Hotels. The hotel property was transferred from CN to Canada Lands Corporation in 1988. The hotel was renamed Crowne Plaza Hotel Toronto in the early 1990s.[1][2] In 2003, the IHG (owner of Crowne Plaza) decided to rebrand the hotel to their upscale InterContinental brand.[1] The property was sold by Canada Lands in 2011 and is now owned by Oxford Properties.

The hotel overlooks the tracks from Union Station (Toronto) and the south sections of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

She ugly!
[IMG]Downtown Toronto Hotel by Toronto Luxury Hotel, on Flickr[/IMG]
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  #85  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2018, 8:26 PM
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^ I vaguely remember it as L'Hotel, which was a very awkward sounding name. It has that classic 80s style!
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  #86  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2018, 8:33 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
^ I vaguely remember it as L'Hotel, which was a very awkward sounding name. It has that classic 80s style!
I always found it was a bit of an odd choice of name for a hotel in Toronto, but it was built in the era where a number of federal agencies and corporations had a bit of a fetish for French names... so French names showed up in the oddest places sometimes.
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  #87  
Old Posted Oct 18, 2018, 10:46 PM
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CP`s chateau champlain sketch in 1964 along with the place du canada office component of the development, which was also built.


CN`s Queen Elizabeth early sketch


The competing CN and CP railway hubs with their respective hotels in view.
The giant gap between the complex bonaventure and the Chateau champlan / place du canada would remain there until the late 80`s when le 1000 DlG would be built.
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  #88  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2018, 8:58 AM
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What a great shot of the CN/CP complex:...thanks for posting!

Here's a link to 'The Railway Station District'

http://www.vieux.montreal.qc.ca/plaq...ng/gare_1a.htm

(Click on the tabs towards the bottom for Central, Windsor, Place Ville Marie etc)
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  #89  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2018, 4:52 PM
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I noticed that Bessborough Hotel, built in Saskatoon in 1935, has been mentioned in first couple pages of this thread but not sure if Saskatchewan's first Grand Railroad Hotels that began construction before that have been mentioned yet...

Grand Truck Pacific Railway began construction in 1913 for
Regina's Château Qu'Appelle on the corner of Albert St & College Ave in Wascana Park opposite the Saskatchewan Legislature building.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chateau_Qu%27Appelle

Due to bankruptcy by the railway, the unfinished hotel structure was later dismantled. 40 years later the Royal Saskatchewan Museum was built on top of the same foundation pilings as the hotel (that's why the museum is set on an angle in the park with lots of lawn in front).



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Saskatchewan_Museum

In response to failed attempt of Château Qu'Appelle,
Canadian Pacific Railway completed Regina's Hotel Saskatchewan in 1929 on Victoria Ave downtown, and has been the residence for visits by Royalty to Regina ever since.


https://amainsider.com/regal-rooms-r...estern-canada/


The Hotel Saskatchewan over took the height of the Saskatchewan Legislature to be tallest building in Regina and maintained the title from the 1920's until the 1960's.

Coincidentally, the Bessborough Hotel in Saskatoon was the tallest building in that city for several decades as well, until the 1960's.



https://www.instagram.com/p/BpBX6fhj...tz_photography
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  #90  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2018, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Put me down as another fan of the Château Champlain. I find it's aged very well and is still very much a chic place.

It also has a pretty cool cabaret theatre in the basement called the Caf' Conc'.

https://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&t....0.vQ-u2ln4_Ec
It's my top 1 ugliest tower in Montréal. Plus the inside smells and looks of better times.
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  #91  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2018, 5:16 AM
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Chadillac already posted the Prince of Wales Hotel in Waterton, but it's worth noting it is the only grand railway hotel not built by a Canadian railway. It was completed by the Great Northern Railway in 1927.

[IMG]Prince_14 by whatnextyvr, on Flickr[/IMG]
Courtesy hikingwithbarry.com
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  #92  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2018, 5:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whatnext View Post
Chadillac already posted the Prince of Wales Hotel in Waterton, but it's worth noting it is the only grand railway hotel not built by a Canadian railway. It was completed by the Great Northern Railway in 1927.
And in no way is the Prince off Wales 'grand'. Its a weird one-off, in the middle of nowhere that looks temporary with the wood construction.

The Bessborough in saskatoon is not on the same level as the 'grand' Canadian railway hotels either (although it is much better than the waterford one) - 3 star at best - it only ever had a DELTA branding (think run of the mill Marriott, Sheraton or Hyatt)- never up to the standards of a Fairmont like the rest (i've stayed at most).

Last edited by craneSpotter; Nov 30, 2018 at 5:41 AM.
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  #93  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2018, 7:16 AM
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Delta Bessborough in Saskatoon had renovations last decade...
but once again will undergo more major renovations in 2019,
at which point Marriott International will have 'The Bess' join it's coveted Luxury Autograph Collection.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autograph_Collection

https://globalnews.ca/news/4400395/b...l-renovations/

Currectly 'The Bess' Hotel has a ★★★★ rating.



Hotel Saskatchewan in Regina is also a ★★★★ with Marriott's International Autograph Luxury Collection accreditation.




Some other Hotels in Canada with ★★★★ ratings include:

Fairmont Royal York Toronto



Fairmont Hotel Vancouver



Fairmont Empress Victoria



Fort Garry Hotel in Winnipeg is one 'Grand' railroad Hotel within a Canadian city that does not have a ★★★★ rating.

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  #94  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2019, 4:01 PM
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Great pic of the Château Laurier.


https://twitter.com/Ottawa_Tourism/s...71974064226315
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  #95  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2019, 5:19 AM
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Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
Fort Garry Hotel in Winnipeg is one 'Grand' railroad Hotel within a Canadian city that does not have a ★★★★ rating.
I was curious to see how Halifax's two railway hotels stacked up; the Nova Scotian is rated ★★★★ and the Lord Nelson is actually rated 4.5.

Interestingly, the Nova Scotian and Hotel Saskatchewan look like they had a very similar design originally. I'm surprised to see that the Hotel Saskatchewan seems like it has been operated as a higher-end hotel than the Bessborough for some time; the exteriors would suggest the opposite.

That Whistler hotel is interesting and seems very well-suited to its area.
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  #96  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2019, 5:33 AM
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I was curious to see how Halifax's two railway hotels stacked up; the Nova Scotian is rated ★★★★ and the Lord Nelson is actually rated 4.5.
The hotels mirror the department store situation. In a lot of the Western cities the railway hotels were the place to stay while in Halifax there were a bunch of older, smaller, and equally nice hotels (Halifax Hotel and Queen Hotel being two examples).

I'm not sure what the nicest hotel in Halifax is today. Sutton Place if that has opened?

At one point there was speculation that both the Lord Nelson and Nova Scotian Hotel would be demolished. And I think the Lord Nelson might have been a quasi rooming house back in the bad old days. The Herald used to publish strange letters to the editor by a guy who lived in the hotel and commented on what he saw out his window.
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  #97  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2019, 6:46 AM
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As far as old-school luxury goes the Lord Nelson is probably the best, the Prince George has a solid reputation as the best contemporary high-end and the Marriott Harbourfront is probably the largest and most high-end overall. The latter always struck me as a nod to the chateauesque movement and it's interesting to see that Whistler one from around the same time period.

The Nova Scotian would probably be a tier below those, the old-school equivalent of the Deltas. I'm expecting the Sutton Place to be similar to those, although it could turn out nicer (and its immediate environs are a lot nicer than the Delta Halifax's for example). There are also a few hotels like the Atlantica and the Hollis that seem chic but don't have much of a reputation one way or the other. It's strange but this point the most low-end hotels downtown are things like the Courtyard Marriott - there's nothing even remotely similar to the Empress in Vancouver for example, although it's not hard to imagine an era where that would have been the dominant level of hotel accommodations in Downtown Halifax.
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  #98  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2019, 9:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
I was curious to see how Halifax's two railway hotels stacked up; the Nova Scotian is rated ★★★★ and the Lord Nelson is actually rated 4.5.

Interestingly, the Nova Scotian and Hotel Saskatchewan look like they had a very similar design originally. I'm surprised to see that the Hotel Saskatchewan seems like it has been operated as a higher-end hotel than the Bessborough for some time; the exteriors would suggest the opposite.

That Whistler hotel is interesting and seems very well-suited to its area.
Quote:
...a nod to the chateauesque movement and it's interesting to see that Whistler one from around the same time period.
...which Whistler hotel exacting are you referring too?

The Halifax hotels do seem to have originally had been built rather small in comparison to Western Canada's Railroad hotels but the Nova Scotia ones later had additions made to their buildings.







One of the highest review ratings I've seen out of any Canadian Hotel is for James Hotel in Saskatoon.

87% Excellent rating is quite the high review.





New ★★★★ hotels to Saskatoon as of this year include LeGermain hotel which opens 2019...


https://www.legermainhotels.com/en/

The only other ★★★★ hotel currently under construction in Saskatoon is the Dakota Dunes Hotel south of the city.



https://thestarphoenix.com/news/loca...ota-chief-says
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  #99  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2019, 11:18 PM
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One Hotel that seems to have flown under the radar on this topic is Jasper Park Lodge...it's my first post so I'm not too sure how to post a photograph of the property but I'm sure someone will.
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  #100  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2019, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Bellinghamgreg View Post
One Hotel that seems to have flown under the radar on this topic is Jasper Park Lodge...it's my first post so I'm not too sure how to post a photograph of the property but I'm sure someone will.
Welcome to SSP!

How to post a picture:

1. Find the picture online;
2. Right click on the image;
3. Click "copy image address";
4. On SSP, click the yellow icon with a mountain and sun in the tool bar above your post;
5. Copy address in the box and click "ok";
6. Copy URL of website where the image was found below the image.


https://www.jasper.travel/where-to-s...er-park-lodge/
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