HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 3:20 AM
megadude megadude is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: N. York/Bram/Mark/Sauga/Burl/Oak/DT
Posts: 712
Some nice suburban downtown parks in places I've lived.


Brampton's Gage Park


https://www.inbrampton.com/gage-park...ng-trail-opens


https://myhomepage.ca/local-focus-brampton-julaug2018/


Mississauga's Kariya Park


A sanctuary honouring Mississauga’s twin-city relationship with Kariya, Japan / photo by Jason Cook


https://wandercrazy.wordpress.com/20...pan-in-canada/


Oakville's Lakeside Park


http://travelwp.com/2009-1010-oakville-ontario-page.htm


My pic


Burlington's Spencer Smith Park - home of Canada's largest ribfest and Sound of Music festival


https://www.tripadvisor.ca/LocationP...n_Ontario.html


https://soundofmusic.ca/about-us/our-story/


https://www.burlington.ca/en/live-an...asp?_mid_=8846
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 4:08 AM
SpongeG's Avatar
SpongeG SpongeG is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 32,463
Emery Barnes park in Yaletown is nice







__________________
belowitall
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 4:12 AM
SpongeG's Avatar
SpongeG SpongeG is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 32,463
Nelson Park in the west end or mole hill is nice



Apparently it will be changing though.



B.C. Hydro aims to fund two Vancouver schools in exchange for underground substation

https://theprovince.com/news/local-n...5-02727da7d8cb
__________________
belowitall
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #24  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 5:21 AM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 8,929
Quote:
Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
Queens park is pretty large and relatively centrally located, but yea, there isn't really a single large downtown park.

I often feel that Nathan Phillips Square would have been better off as a nice large park.. but too late now.

There is Allen Gardens and Moss Park which are both pretty significant in size, but are extremely underutilized and are in rough parts of town. Moss Park could probably be a great park if the Armoury was moved, and the park upgraded and expanded onto the entire block, and the area cleaned up a bit. The southeast corner of the park is one of the roughest intersections in the city though, which makes it tougher.

Berczy is great, but it is very small. Claude Cormier is now planning a similar park at York and Queens Quay which is a lot larger and looks quite promising.

Trinity bellwoods is really rather run down (as are most Toronto parks really), but is probably one of the liveliest in the country on a warm summer day. The place is a total zoo. Not really downtown in the traditional sense though.
Agree about Moss Park and that Toronto doesn't have a large park downtown. Rail Deck park is our last shot at having one.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #25  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 6:00 AM
WhipperSnapper's Avatar
WhipperSnapper WhipperSnapper is offline
I am the law!
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Toronto+
Posts: 16,725
Quote:
Originally Posted by niwell View Post
Yeah I was very pleasantly surprised when I checked it out this summer - it doesn’t have the hype of Berczy but quite well done. The reno of queens park is looking promising too with the new brick paving at the entrances and around the monuments.

Based on the criteria though, Toronto doesn’t have much in the way of true central “downtown” parks (lots in the formally defined downtown of course). Cloud gardens has a ton of potential but is in kind of rough shape right now. A bit frthed but it will be interesting to see how college park turns out - there’s some good aspects but doesn’t seem up to the quality of berczy or grange, which probably isnt surprising given the funding arrangement.
The outside area of Cloud Garden is gone. It's now a staging area for Bay Adelaide 3. The Bay Adelaide Plaza is a great place to sit and gossip so I have high hopes on the new Cloud Garden.

College Park sits on top of a parking garage and has to with emergency exits and exhaust vents. Mature trees are questionable as well. I'm not sure what to think of College Park. With that said, I do find it takes a lot of cues from the modern standard of new parks (reduced maintenance) that I find don't deliver on providing contrast with enough green surfaces and cover. In other words, too much concrete/aggregate.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #26  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 6:05 AM
WhipperSnapper's Avatar
WhipperSnapper WhipperSnapper is offline
I am the law!
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Toronto+
Posts: 16,725
Quote:
Originally Posted by niwell View Post
Yeah I was very pleasantly surprised when I checked it out this summer - it doesn’t have the hype of Berczy but quite well done. The reno of queens park is looking promising too with the new brick paving at the entrances and around the monuments.

Based on the criteria though, Toronto doesn’t have much in the way of true central “downtown” parks (lots in the formally defined downtown of course). Cloud gardens has a ton of potential but is in kind of rough shape right now. A bit frthed but it will be interesting to see how college park turns out - there’s some good aspects but doesn’t seem up to the quality of berczy or grange, which probably isnt surprising given the funding arrangement.
The outside area of Cloud Garden is gone. It's now a staging area for Bay Adelaide 3. The Bay Adelaide Plaza is a great place to sit and gossip so I have high hopes on the new Cloud Garden.

College Park sits on top of a parking garage and has to with emergency exits and exhaust vents. Mature trees are questionable as well. I'm not sure what to think of College Park. With that said, I do find it takes a lot of cues from the modern standard of new parks (reduced maintenance) that I find don't deliver on providing contrast with enough green surfaces and cover. In other words, too much concrete/aggregate.

I'm really looking forward to the revitalization of Allan Gardens.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #27  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 9:53 AM
Wpg_Guy's Avatar
Wpg_Guy Wpg_Guy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 2,960
The Forks - Winnipeg


Last edited by Wpg_Guy; Dec 28, 2018 at 10:09 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #28  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2018, 2:32 PM
J.OT13's Avatar
J.OT13 J.OT13 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 7,856
In Ottawa, if we're excluding plazas around office towers, roof-top terraces, Parliament Hill and Marion Dewar Plaza in front of City Hall, both of which would be considered "front lawns", we're left with Major's Hill Park, Confederation Square and the Garden of the Provinces. We also have Nepean Point, but that's a little more out of the way, tucked behind the National Gallery.

The former two are often used for events and festivals. Major's Hill is home to Tavern on the Hill (they also run Tavern on the Falls in another park further down Sussex Drive) in summer, where they serve beer, cocktails, wine and gourmet hot dogs.

Major's Hill Park


https://www.ottawatourism.ca/member/...ulip-festival/


https://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/le...th-canada-post


Photo by me.


https://www.tripadvisor.ca/LocationP...a_Ontario.html

Confederation Park


http://fpm.ca/lisgar-apartments-for-rent-ottawa/

Garden of the Provinces and Territories


https://heritageottawa.org/50years/g...nd-territories
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #29  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2018, 9:27 AM
SpongeG's Avatar
SpongeG SpongeG is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 32,463
Victory Square is a small park on east hastings and Cambie just on the edge of the DTES, and it is heavily used on sunny days especially. It's a mix of drug users, hipsters, tech workers and students. And home to Remembrance day goings on. It was given a refurbish a number of years ago, that is when they added in the new helmet lighting.











the lighting in the park is like old helmets




circa 1917
__________________
belowitall

Last edited by SpongeG; Dec 29, 2018 at 9:37 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #30  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2018, 10:00 AM
SpongeG's Avatar
SpongeG SpongeG is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 32,463
Harbour Green Park at Coal Harbour is a nice spot.

circa 2009?






quite the change since it first arrived - 2002
__________________
belowitall
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #31  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2018, 10:14 AM
SpongeG's Avatar
SpongeG SpongeG is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 32,463
this park doesn't exist yet but will start construction in 2019. The newest downtown park.

location


renders - looks like it was designed for instagram


__________________
belowitall
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #32  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2018, 5:13 PM
hipster duck's Avatar
hipster duck hipster duck is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Car-oriented Toronto
Posts: 1,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
looks like it was designed for instagram
A lot of physical things seem like they're designed for Instagram these days.

I'm about 60% in favour of this, 40% against.

The bad part is the shallowness of not actually experiencing a physical space on any other level than just posting about it on social media to collect likes.

But the good part is that it has injected design and whimsy into places that were once incredibly staid, and it has gotten people to go out and interact with their cities, even if it is on a superficial level. In the past they would have stayed home, and SSP-type people who actually enjoy the physical aspects of the city would have been left wandering around a city with more gravel parking lots and blank walls.

I think Canadian cities are net beneficiaries of Instagram. If I was from Italy, I'd probably have the opposite reaction.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #33  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2018, 5:43 PM
MonkeyRonin's Avatar
MonkeyRonin MonkeyRonin is offline
¥ ¥ ¥
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 6,463
Yorkville Park is one of my favourites. Small, but well designed with both aesthetics & function in mind; with four distinct "zones" representative of different Canadian landscapes - including one with a 700-ton granite rock from Muskoka.



http://kensmithworkshop.com/yorkville.html
__________________
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #34  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2018, 7:34 PM
SpongeG's Avatar
SpongeG SpongeG is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 32,463
Quote:
Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
A lot of physical things seem like they're designed for Instagram these days.

I'm about 60% in favour of this, 40% against.

The bad part is the shallowness of not actually experiencing a physical space on any other level than just posting about it on social media to collect likes.

But the good part is that it has injected design and whimsy into places that were once incredibly staid, and it has gotten people to go out and interact with their cities, even if it is on a superficial level. In the past they would have stayed home, and SSP-type people who actually enjoy the physical aspects of the city would have been left wandering around a city with more gravel parking lots and blank walls.

I think Canadian cities are net beneficiaries of Instagram. If I was from Italy, I'd probably have the opposite reaction.
yes, its interesting to see the impact that social media is having on "real world" projects now. This little park compared to some of the more recent ones in Vancouver has a lot packed into it.

That new installation in New York at Hudsons Yard is also something that seems to have social media in mind as well.

Excited to see this park finish.
__________________
belowitall
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #35  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2019, 2:51 PM
J.OT13's Avatar
J.OT13 J.OT13 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 7,856
Another of Confederation Park from Twitter.


https://twitter.com/alamgirK/status/1079827157235445760
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #36  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2019, 7:58 PM
isaidso isaidso is offline
The New Republic
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United Provinces of America
Posts: 8,929
I find most of the new 'parks' (post #31 a prime example) being built strange. They're a departure from the serene green spaces (Mont Royal, Hyde Park) I'm used to. These modern spaces are jam packed with non organic features and akin to an amusement park or jungle gym for adults. Perhaps it's a reflection of the recent generation who have been bombarded with visual/audio stimulation from birth. My brother's kids are lost/uncomfortable unless they're inundated with a constant stimuli; louder and brighter is better.

Is this a new Canadian aesthetic or just what new parks look like these days? I do like Berzcy Park in Toronto although it has a bit too much going on for my tastes. It's not an oasis in the city but more an extension of it.
__________________
World's First Documented Baseball Game: Beachville, Ontario, June 4th, 1838.
World's First Documented Gridiron Game: University College, Toronto, November 9th, 1861.
Hamilton Tiger-Cats since 1869 & Toronto Argonauts since 1873: North America's 2 oldest pro football teams

Last edited by isaidso; Jan 1, 2019 at 8:30 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #37  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2019, 8:08 PM
ssiguy ssiguy is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: White Rock BC
Posts: 6,216
Great to see these pics. Parks are essential in making a city worth living in giving a needed respite from the concrete that surrounds it.


I have to say though, and I admit I am biased, that London`s Victoria Park still seems to be the one to beat. It is right downtown basically as close to the downtown shopping and business district as humanely possible and she`s a beauty. I wish I had some computer skills as I would put up some pics and location. Any takers?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #38  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2019, 8:40 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 15,268
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssiguy View Post
Great to see these pics. Parks are essential in making a city worth living in giving a needed respite from the concrete that surrounds it.


I have to say though, and I admit I am biased, that London`s Victoria Park still seems to be the one to beat. It is right downtown basically as close to the downtown shopping and business district as humanely possible and she`s a beauty. I wish I had some computer skills as I would put up some pics and location. Any takers?
Kitchener's Victoria Park (1896) is not as old as London's, but it's several times larger and also right downtown. A very nice example of a Victorian Romantic style park.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #39  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2019, 11:17 PM
Andy6's Avatar
Andy6 Andy6 is offline
Starring as himself
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Toronto Yorkville
Posts: 8,041
Another great Victoria Park is in Truro, N.S.
__________________
crispy crunchy light and snappy
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #40  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2019, 11:28 PM
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
Nouvellecosse Nouvellecosse is offline
As seen on SSC ;)
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,589
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
I find most of the new 'parks' (post #31 a prime example) being built strange. They're a departure from the serene green spaces (Mont Royal, Hyde Park) I'm used to. These modern spaces are jam packed with non organic features and akin to an amusement park or jungle gym for adults. Perhaps it's a reflection of the recent generation who have been bombarded with visual/audio stimulation from birth. My brother's kids are lost/uncomfortable unless they're inundated with a constant stimuli; louder and brighter is better.

Is this a new Canadian aesthetic or just what new parks look like these days? I do like Berzcy Park in Toronto although it has a bit too much going on for my tastes. It's not an oasis in the city but more an extension of it.
Personally I enjoy both types. The busy/groomed/artifical types seem more like the public squares of old in the sense that they're meeting places and intended to be urban hubs of activity and I enjoy this for what it is, but I agree that they don't replace the quiet/peaceful respite type parks you're referring to. i just think they're totally different intended for different purposes. I wonder if we're seeing more of the urban space-type parks than quiet ones now because those are the type of spaces our cities are most lacking in? It seems like for a long time there were no new truly public urban spaces created other than the streets themselves. That role was often played by indoor shopping mall-type spaces but those are privately owned.
__________________
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man." - George Bernard Shaw
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:27 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.