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Old Posted Dec 5, 2013, 3:31 AM
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Ottawa-Gatineau Sinkholes

Watermain break causes sinkhole in Gatineau

By Doug Hempstead, Ottawa Sun
First posted: Wednesday, December 04, 2013 01:49 PM EST | Updated: Wednesday, December 04, 2013 02:11 PM EST


Commuters in Gatineau are in for a treat on the way home today.

A watermain break has created a large sinkhole-like pit in the middle of Maisonneuve Blvd.

As a result, crews have partially closed the busy street to traffic. Four northbound lanes will be closed between Papineau St. and des Allumettières Blvd.

The water main break happened early Wednesday morning. Gatineau roads crews are currently on-scene fixing the break and filling the hole.

Twitter: @doughempstead

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  #2  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2013, 2:25 AM
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Well, I guess we're gonna need this thread with all the new sinkholes appearing in the last little while.
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2014, 6:54 PM
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Sinkhole closes section of Anderson Road

By OTTAWA CITIZEN, Ottawa Citizen April 5, 2014 2:04 PM


OTTAWA - Authorities have closed Anderson Road between Ridge and Renaud roads due to a large sinkhole.

Detours are in effect and motorists are advised to avoid the area.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2014, 7:14 PM
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^ Huh? I thought sinkholes were caused by sewer systems... does that section of Anderson have municipal services? I wouldn't have thought so
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Old Posted Apr 5, 2014, 7:44 PM
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All sorts of unstable soil especially Leda Clay in the area. That stretch of road is built on an ancient riverbed which is now the Mer Bleue bog. There is actually piped water in Carlsbad Springs and the area to the west of it, but not on the stretch of Anderson with the sinkhole.
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Old Posted May 15, 2014, 3:00 PM
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Water main rupture causes road collapse

By Ottawa Citizen, Ottawa Citizen May 15, 2014


A broken water main Wednesday evening caused an eight-foot sinkhole on a residential street in Overbrook.

The pipe ruptured at about 9:45 p.m., covering Francis Street in water and causing the pavement to give way, said Staff-Sgt. Rick Giroux of the Ottawa Police Service. No one was injured.

Police closed the street between Donald and Newman streets.

A city crew was on the scene at about 10 p.m. to repair the damage. It was not known when water would be restored to the area.

Giroux could not say when the street would be reopened to traffic.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/enterta...154/story.html
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Old Posted Jul 2, 2014, 11:07 PM
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9-metre deep sinkhole closes Quebec highway west of Ottawa

By Amanda Kelly and Marieke Walsh,
Global News


A large sinkhole has shut down a highway in Western Quebec, just west of Ottawa and south of the Gatineau Park. Transports Quebec confirmed that Highway 148, between Quyon and Luskville, has been closed after a nine-metre-deep sinkhole opened up over a culvert.

The agency said that the three-metre wide sinkhole, which spans a highway lane, was caused by heavy rains.

“For security, we had to close both lanes of the highway,” said Transports Quebec spokesperson Karine Sauve.

“We cannot confirm when the road will be reopened, it could be several days.”

She noted that the sinkhole was caused by erosion and the rain on Tuesday.

“There was too much water in the culvert and this caused the collapse of the road.”

Motorists are advised to use alternative routes, such as Highway 105, Route 366, via Heardley-Matcham or the Quyon Ferry.

According to authorities, crews are working to build a makeshift road around the sinkhole.



More photos:
http://globalnews.ca/news/1428113/30...est-of-ottawa/
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Old Posted Jul 3, 2014, 2:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketphish View Post
9-metre deep sinkhole closes Quebec highway west of Ottawa

By Amanda Kelly and Marieke Walsh,
Global News


A large sinkhole has shut down a highway in Western Quebec, just west of Ottawa and south of the Gatineau Park. Transports Quebec confirmed that Highway 148, between Quyon and Luskville, has been closed after a nine-metre-deep sinkhole opened up over a culvert.

The agency said that the three-metre wide sinkhole, which spans a highway lane, was caused by heavy rains.

“For security, we had to close both lanes of the highway,” said Transports Quebec spokesperson Karine Sauve.

“We cannot confirm when the road will be reopened, it could be several days.”

She noted that the sinkhole was caused by erosion and the rain on Tuesday.

“There was too much water in the culvert and this caused the collapse of the road.”

Motorists are advised to use alternative routes, such as Highway 105, Route 366, via Heardley-Matcham or the Quyon Ferry.

According to authorities, crews are working to build a makeshift road around the sinkhole.[/url]
Apparently this thing is causing a 2-hour detour for some people for their commute. That sure must be very frustrating for them.
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  #9  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2014, 12:48 AM
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Crews work to open temporary Highway 148 bypass by Friday

Meghan Hurley, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: July 3, 2014, Last Updated: July 3, 2014 8:12 PM EDT


Quebec’s Ministry of Transportation says a temporary bypass should be finished by Friday afternoon to allow traffic on Highway 148 in Luskville after the road was shut down by a large washout that destroyed a culvert.

Karine Sauvé, a Quebec Ministry of Transportation spokeswoman, said crews have to replace the culvert, fill the washout with gravel and pave the shoulder before the temporary lane can open to traffic.

The road has been closed between Nugent and Alary roads since Wednesday, forcing drivers on a 76-kilometre detour.

“That’s the emergency right now,” Sauvé said. “It’s to try to find a faster way for people to go either at home or at work.”

Once the one-lane temporary road is complete, “major” work to replace the culvert needs to be done and will take between four to six weeks, Sauvé said.

The washout measures about 10 metres deep and six metres wide sent a higher than normal number of commuters to the Quyon ferry to get to Ontario instead of the hour-long detour.

Sauvé said a crew was sent to Highway 148 on Wednesday to inspect whether the small culvert was overloaded by runoff from heavy rains. While the crew was on the highway, the culvert collapsed. They were not using any machinery at the time.

The collapse was caused by erosion of the soil from heavy rain after the severe weather on Canada Day that caused a “microburst” windstorm sweep to through the area.

The owner of the Quyon ferry, Don McColgan, said the highway closure resulted in a 30-per-cent boost in customers.

McColgan’s staff members have been busy shuttling people back and forth across the Ottawa River.

Drivers didn’t have a long wait since the new ferry that went into operation on June 22 can carry as many as 21 vehicles. The new ferry has replaced the two seven-car ferries that operated for more than 40 years.

“Wednesday night was the busiest. It died off around 8 o’clock,” McColgan said, adding that it’s rare for his staff to work past 8 p.m.

mhurley@ottawacitizen.com
Twitter.com/meghan_hurley



http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...pass-by-friday
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  #10  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2014, 5:06 PM
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Highway 174 sinkhole driver sues city for more than half-million dollars

Chris Cobb, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: September 10, 2014, Last Updated: September 10, 2014 12:10 PM EDT


The driver whose car plunged and almost disappeared down a large sinkhole in Orléans two years ago is suing the city for $550,000 damages.

Juan Pedro Unger, his wife, Jennifer, and their young daughter have all filed lawsuits related to the trauma that Unger says he suffered when he became trapped in his 2009 Hyundai as it was slowly swallowed by Highway 174 on Sept. 4, 2012.

Unger, suspended by his seatbelt, managed to free himself, climb out of his car and cling to the wall of the hole before being grabbed by two passersby who hauled him to safety.

An ambulance, coincidentally passing the scene, stopped to assess Unger’s injuries as he watched his car slide further into the hole.

The lawsuit filed by the Unger family claims that the sinkhole was caused by the collapse of a section of large metal storm-water pipe below the road and the city was negligent in not maintaining it properly.

The pipe was “severely corroded” claims the lawsuit and the city was also negligent in not warning motorists of the possible danger.

Unger suffered numerous physical and emotional injuries for which he needs ongoing therapy, claims the lawsuit

He suffered whiplash, cuts to his abdomen and legs and ongoing restricted mobility and pain in his upper body.

The trauma-induced after effects Unger suffers include sleeping difficulties, nightmares, depression, anxiety and a fear of driving.

“Mr. Unger has sustained, and will continue to sustain, psychological distress and loss of enjoyment of life,” says the lawsuit. “He is unable to participate in recreational, social and sporting activities … in particular he has been unable to enjoy recreational, social and athletic activities with his young daughter.”

The accident has caused Unger to lose income and, says the suit, added a heavy domestic load on his wife Jennifer who has been forced to take leave from work.

The city says it will defend the lawsuit.

Photos: http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...illion-dollars

ccobb@ottawacitizen.com
twitter.com/chrisicobb
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  #11  
Old Posted Jul 4, 2016, 3:09 AM
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You can hunt sinkholes, but it's slow and expensive

Tom Spears, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: July 3, 2016 | Last Updated: July 3, 2016 5:28 PM EDT




People wondering how Rideau Street caved in without warning might spare a thought for a Florida man named Jeffrey Bush, who was out of work and down on his luck in 2013.

A friend helped him out. Buddy Wicker (actual given name: Leland) offered Bush a room in his own home near Tampa. But Bush’s luck didn’t turn around.

In the middle of the night, a sinkhole swallowed a corner of the house — only one room, but it was the bedroom where the luckless Bush was sleeping. They never found his body.

The story gets stranger. Months earlier, Wicker had seen a State Farm ad for sinkhole insurance, and signed up. The insurance company sent a crew to check out the property and make sure there was no sign of a sinkhole. Wicker’s place passed the test a mere five months before it was sucked underground.

But what was happening silently underground had been developing for years, even centuries, in the Florida bedrock, which is prone to sinkholes because it’s limestone permeated with water, and the rock tends to dissolve.

Water-filled cracks grow into pockets, and pockets become major cavities underground. The roof of the cavity can thin as more water dissolves more rock. And one day the thin layer of unsupported rock just collapses — sometimes a few metres down and sometimes dozens.

Tony Randazzo studied and taught about sinkholes at the University of Florida for 35 years, and now does private-sector engineering work, looking for them.

Rideau Street, he says, didn’t technically have a sinkhole. He suspects washed-out soil was our problem, whereas a sinkhole means the slow erosion of rock over time.

Either way, the road collapsed. And while there is technology for searching for weak spots, he argues against surveying every road in the city.

“It’s really kind of impractical to go around the streets and say, “I’d like to check the condition of the roadway because there’s always a chance” of a collapse, he said.

“The most economical way if you wanted to do it — if you have deep pockets and a lot of resources — is to use ground-penetrating radar.”

A crew drags a sled along the surface, and this carries a radar that “looks” straight down by shooting radio waves into the earth. The waves that bounce back to it from different underground structures show a skilled reader what is rock, what is soil and what is a cavern waiting to collapse.

Typically it makes images down to a depth of about five metres, Randazzo said.

“You walk it along the roadway. You have a person pulling it. It runs at one or two miles per hour. You can survey mile after mile after mile relatively inexpensively — but the operative word here is relatively.”

He estimates the work would cost $2,000 U.S. to $3,000 a day. That makes it economical and useful to survey a small area where someone has suspicions, but not to do a whole city.

Suspicious areas, he suggests, tend to be those with very old infrastructure — sewers, underground conduits for utilities and water mains that may have corroded or broken. (The hole that opened at the edge of Road 174 in 2012, swallowing a Hyundai, was caused by the collapse of a section of large metal storm-water pipe. The Hyundai owner is now suing the city.)

And Randazzo says “it would make a lot of sense” to also survey areas near tunnelling, though he is not blaming the LRT tunnel for the Rideau Street hole.

Water mains often have slow leaks that gradually erode the soil around them, he said. If so, radar could show a washed-out area before it caves in. However, if the water is running fast, the ground could look solid one day and be washed out a short time later.

Another limitation is that radar doesn’t work as well in clay because the radar signal is partly absorbed instead of bouncing back, which leaves an image with poorer resolution than rock or sand. Ottawa has a lot of clay.

“It obviously has limitations but it would help, particularly (with) the imminent types of collapses — like, within five years of a collapse.”

His view is echoed by another engineering researcher, Alister Smith of the University of Loughborough in England. He did his PhD in Canada at Queen’s University.

“Geophysical technologies that could be useful in this application include, but are not limited to: ground penetrating radar, seismic tomography and electrical resistivity tomography,” he said in an email. “Such geophysical surveys allow 2D/3D images of the subsurface to be produced, and if surveys are performed through time, the formation of voids could be detected.

“The problem is that these surveys are expensive and it is uneconomical to perform them unless there is a concern in a specific area.”

tspears@postmedia.com
twitter.com/TomSpears1

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...-and-expensive
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Old Posted Oct 3, 2017, 1:47 PM
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There was a sinkhole on Eddy yesterday by the Chaudière Bridge, no?
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Old Posted Dec 10, 2017, 12:46 AM
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Blair Road to remain closed until Sunday after large hole forms
Councillor says hole was caught early, posed no danger

CBC News
Posted: Dec 09, 2017 12:45 PM ET Last Updated: Dec 09, 2017 6:01 PM ET




A stretch of Blair Road near the Pine View Golf Course remains closed Saturday evening, more than five hours after a large hole opened in the side of the east Ottawa thoroughfare.

Police closed Blair Road between Innes and Meadowbrook roads after the sinkhole formed late Saturday morning.

Tim Tierney, the councillor for the area, told CBC News Saturday afternoon the hole formed during work on a nearby culvert.

"Of course, there's always concern anytime a roadway could be impacted. But this was caught well in advance," Tierney said. "There was no danger."

Alain Gonthier, director of infrastructure services with the City of Ottawa, said the affected stretch of Blair Road will remain closed until at least midday Sunday.

Gonthier said a broken watermain underneath the culvert caused significant erosion, which led to Saturday's collapse.

Valerie Aji said she was in her kitchen when she saw the road collapse.

"Pieces and big chunks of the road were just falling into the hole," Aji said.

"You could feel it. You could hear it even in my house. You could hear the dropping and the water splashing up."

She said she could see drivers making their way along Blair Road, not knowing that just off to the side was a hole large enough to swallow a car.

A police spokesperson was unable to confirm the size of the hole and the circumstances that caused it.

OC Transpo has detoured routes 94 and 42 in both directions and route 26 westbound until further notice.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...lice-1.4441430
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Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 11:41 AM
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Sections of downtown Ottawa remain off limits after water main break

By Beatrice Britneff, Global News
June 5, 2018 3:12 pm




Two stretches of road in downtown Ottawa remain closed to traffic after a water main break caused flooding in the area, as well as a small sinkhole at the intersection of O’Connor Street and Nepean Street.

O’Connor Street is closed between Lisgar Street and Gloucester Street, while Nepean Street is off limits from Bank Street to Metcalfe Street.

OC Transpo is now warning that riders can expect delays on “many” bus routes passing through the downtown area this afternoon and evening.

Work is underway to repair the Centretown roads but it’s still unknown how long that will take.

The water main break occurred below a gas main early Tuesday morning at the intersection of O’Connor at Nepean, according to the city of Ottawa. The water that flowed from the break displaced the “underlying soil and roadbed,” Carol Hall, the city’s manager of water distribution, said in a statement.

By late morning, crews had isolated the break and stopped the flooding, Hall added.

An asphalt crew was scheduled to immediately begin repairing the road after fixing the water main.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4254466/s...er-main-break/
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Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 5:45 PM
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Repairs to broken Centretown watermain will continue into Thursday

Kieran Delamont, Ottawa Citizen
Updated: June 7, 2018




Efforts to repair a major watermain break in Centretown will keep two sections of road closed until at least midday Thursday.

The City of Ottawa had hoped to have the work completed by late Wednesday afternoon, but said the repairs are taking longer than expected.

“Repairs are expected to be complete by Thursday midday,” said Carol Hall, manager of water distribution. “Crews are working closely with partners to resolve the issue as quickly as possible.”

The break occurred near the intersection of O’Connor and Nepean streets early Tuesday morning, causing minor flooding in the area. Routine repairs were underway when the 16-inch water main broke. The resulting amount of water washed away the underlying soil and road bed, causing a small sinkhole (to which Ottawan residents need no introduction).

O’Connor Street was closed between Laurier and Lisgar, while Nepean was closed between Bank and Metcalfe. Those closures will continue until repairs are complete.

O’Connor remains open to pedestrians and cyclists.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...-into-thursday
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