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  #41  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2009, 3:39 PM
highwater highwater is offline
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There is a tendency for 905 kids to reject everything about the suburbs where they grew up and embrace the city.
I'd hazard a guess it's a minority who feel this way. I certainly see no evidence among the Mac students I encounter, many of whom find even Westdale too grotty for them. That's basically my point, though. Some students will find downtown appealing, so focus on them and forget the rest.
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  #42  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2009, 5:04 PM
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I guess my point was that the 905ers who want to live in an urban centre do not choose Hamilton as their destination. So it makes sense the Mac students you encounter don't want to even bother exploring the downtown. Mac only has a population of 20,000, not a very large subset of the 905 group. From personal experience, I can tell you that there are many more 905ers living in Toronto. They dwarf ALL Mac students put together. This is a potential demographic that Hamilton is missing out on.
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  #43  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2009, 7:47 PM
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Dominated? Really? I'm going to play the adam card here and demand you back it up with a link or other irrefutable proof.
Every urbanist book I've read has identified the trend of younger professionals taking residence in the downtown core after being raised in the suburbs. Meanwhile new parents tend to move outwards, and so the cycle continues. It's only common sense that most 20-30 year olds in downtown TO were raised in the 905, that's where most children were raised 20-30 years ago (and today).
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  #44  
Old Posted May 23, 2009, 4:30 PM
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No room for NIMBY if Hamilton is to benefit from good planning

May 23, 2009
TERRY COOKE
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/Opinions/article/570692

Being hanged in effigy is an experience you don't soon forget. My trip to the gallows as a rookie city councillor was courtesy of a west Hamilton neighbourhood unhappy with an infill apartment proposal that I supported on the site of an abandoned factory at 101 Broadway Avenue back in 1986.

When opponents of the project protested at a public meeting that the development would attract students (gasp), nurses (horrors) and other undesirables to the neighbourhood, I countered sarcastically that maybe we should just bring back the historic Westdale covenant that precluded blacks, Jews and Eastern European immigrants from owning property there. Subtlety was never my strong suit; my constituents weren't amused.

When council considered the matter, a packed gallery of angry residents became so disruptive that the mayor had to adjourn the meeting and summon security.

But I stood my ground, the two apartments were approved and built and ultimately were a very positive addition to the area. And west-end voters subsequently forgave my impertinence and continued to elect me by big margins.

I recount that character-building political experience to highlight the most pressing and politically volatile planning challenge of this generation. Intensification, infill and brownfield developments constitute both good planning and present enormous economic opportunities for Hamilton, but change is hard for established neighbourhoods, and the knee-jerk reaction is too often to oppose height and density.

Unfortunately, the too frequent response by ward councillors is to pander to not-in-my-back-yard sentiments in order to appease voters. Councillors know their council colleagues and/or the Ontario Municipal Board will be compelled to grant the necessary approvals because of municipal staff support and conformity with provincial planning policies.

This cynical game just breeds distrust by voters who feel manipulated by the process, while discouraging developers from risking capital in a community that doesn't seem to appreciate the financial risks involved in trying to advance good infill projects in the absence of consistent political support.

Thankfully, Ward 1 (west-end) Councillor Brian McHattie demonstrated last week the ability to navigate these difficult political waters.

McHattie was confronted with a proposal for a 10-storey infill apartment building on Ewen Road in an industrial property buffered from the surrounding single-family neighbourhood by a hydro corridor and a mis-mash of other commercial and industrial properties. The development is intended to be a purpose-built student residence.

McHattie did his homework on the file. First, he satisfied himself that the out-of-town developer had a track record for building quality, and effectively managing previous projects. He helped to educate the neighbourhood association about the process, and mediated to get improvements to the aesthetics and scale of the proposal to ensure compatibility with the neighbourhood.

But when a faction of the neighbourhood, led by former councillor Mary Kiss, continued to oppose the development, McHattie did the principled thing and supported the project while encouraging his council colleagues to do likewise.

In some ways the Ewen Road proposal would appear to be a no-brainer since so much of our future is riding on overcoming such predictable opposition to increased density and height.

We will need to do it if we hope to support a Light Rail Transit System, we require it to renew older neighbourhoods and it provides our best opportunity for future economic development and architectural enhancement.

My guess is that McHattie's voters will in time see the wisdom of his judgment on this issue.

Perhaps more importantly, he provided a positive example our council can learn from
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  #45  
Old Posted May 23, 2009, 6:10 PM
highwater highwater is offline
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Terry Cooke praising McHattie. Now I've seen it all. Hopefully this will encourage some of the other Old Boys to quit bashing our best councillor. Are you listening Dreschel? DiIanni?
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  #46  
Old Posted May 24, 2009, 2:17 AM
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Cooke has been consistent with his views for at least a year, when he came to Stinson's side about the time of the Snake Oil Editorial Cartoon and last year's economic summit.

I really look forward to his Saturday column now. It's inspiring to see someone from that generation to finally see things through the dust storm of the 60s & 70s.

He's obviously changed his opinion since he's seen the facts change. Good on Terry.
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  #47  
Old Posted May 24, 2009, 6:01 AM
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I really look forward to his Saturday column now. It's inspiring to see someone from that generation to finally see things through the dust storm of the 60s & 70s.

He's obviously changed his opinion since he's seen the facts change. Good on Terry.
I don't know what generation you think he's from, but the man isn't that old. He was in high school during the late 70's. He's only 48 or 49 years old, which makes him about the average age of most on council today.

As for him changing his opinion, you better re read the article. It wasn't about him changing his mind, he was congradulating McHattie for standing his ground, as he himself did in a similar situation during the mid 80's.
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  #48  
Old Posted May 24, 2009, 5:30 PM
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He's only 48 or 49 years old, which makes him about the average age of most on council today.
Bingo.

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Originally Posted by bigguy1231 View Post
As for him changing his opinion, you better re read the article. It wasn't about him changing his mind, he was congradulating (sic) McHattie for standing his ground, as he himself did in a similar situation during the mid 80's.
With the exception of his recent columns, Cooke's track record both in and out of office has been to promote sprawl, even going so far as to back McHattie's opponent in the last election. Now he is praising McHattie for promoting densification. This represents a clear change in position on his part.

Whether it's a true conversion however, or whether he simply realizes which way the political winds are blowing these days, is anyone's guess.
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  #49  
Old Posted May 24, 2009, 5:57 PM
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ok we get it...you don't like him because he didn't support the councillor (McHattie) that can do no wrong in your eyes, in the last election. hardly justifies that kind of a broad-brush attack. You may agree or disagree with Cooke on the issues that he has pushed over the years, many of which were controversial (Red Hill and Amalgamation), but he has never blown with the political winds.And as the column pointed out, he was taking heat for supporting densification long before it became a flavour of the month politically.
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  #50  
Old Posted May 24, 2009, 7:28 PM
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With the exception of his recent columns, Cooke's track record both in and out of office has been to promote sprawl, even going so far as to back McHattie's opponent in the last election.
Backing McHattie's opponent was being pro-sprawl? Kinda like saying being anti-Bush is being un-American. A little heavy on hyperbole.

For the record, while I have not been much of a fan of Cooke's, but he can't be summarily dismissed as a promoter of sprawl. He was after all one of the first cheerleaders for LRT, very much an anti-sprawl initiative. In fact, he was a big proponent of it back in the 80's long before it became fashionable, but our regional council passed on the opportunity to showcase an elevated ART prototype, which I believe is now known as Vancouver's Skytrain.

Last edited by markbarbera; May 24, 2009 at 7:49 PM.
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  #51  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 1:22 AM
JT Jacobs JT Jacobs is offline
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Backing McHattie's opponent was being pro-sprawl? Kinda like saying being anti-Bush is being un-American. A little heavy on hyperbole.

For the record, while I have not been much of a fan of Cooke's, but he can't be summarily dismissed as a promoter of sprawl. He was after all one of the first cheerleaders for LRT, very much an anti-sprawl initiative. In fact, he was a big proponent of it back in the 80's long before it became fashionable, but our regional council passed on the opportunity to showcase an elevated ART prototype, which I believe is now known as Vancouver's Skytrain.
Last I heard Cooke works for Mattamy homes sourcing prime suburban land for future developments. FYI.
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  #52  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 5:08 AM
bigguy1231 bigguy1231 is offline
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Originally Posted by highwater View Post
With the exception of his recent columns, Cooke's track record both in and out of office has been to promote sprawl, even going so far as to back McHattie's opponent in the last election. Now he is praising McHattie for promoting densification. This represents a clear change in position on his part.

Whether it's a true conversion however, or whether he simply realizes which way the political winds are blowing these days, is anyone's guess.
He was also one of the architects of Vision 20/20 which was an award winning urban plan that was initiated by this city. He regularily speaks on the subject to groups around the world.

As for his conversion, conversion to what, your way of thinking. Sorry but other than you and a handful of others posting here your vision of this city is way out of line with the majority in this city. Most people I know, think McHattie is a joke. Just one of a long line of useless politicians from that ward. The exception being Terry Cooke.
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  #53  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 1:20 PM
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Sorry bigguy, the wave of change in public opinion has already swept by you and 'most people you know'. You're just now looking around and wondering why your pants are all wet.
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  #54  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 2:51 PM
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Most people I know, think McHattie is a joke.
I wonder who knows more people?

Because most people I know think McHattie is a hard working and selfless individual, and easily the best councillor at City Hall. (Not too difficult mind you).

Hmmm, I guess the votes will tell the story ... oh wait ... nevermind
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  #55  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 4:01 PM
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Are you telling me that running city-wide you think that your guy would come anywhere close to the 65-70 per cent of the popular vote Cooke won in his last election for Regional Chair before retiring from politics? That seems like a stretch to me...I guess you will have to get McHattie to run for Mayor in order to find out.
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  #56  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 4:47 PM
highwater highwater is offline
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Backing McHattie's opponent was being pro-sprawl? Kinda like saying being anti-Bush is being un-American. A little heavy on hyperbole.
I didn't say he opposed McHattie ergo he is pro-sprawl. I said his policy record is overwhelmingly pro-sprawl, and that he carried his agenda as far as using his power to try to oust an anti-sprawl candidate ie, he is pro-sprawl therefore he opposed McHattie, not he opposed McHattie therefore he is pro-sprawl.
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  #57  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 5:01 PM
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As for his conversion, conversion to what, your way of thinking.
No. His conversion to the prevailing wisdom on economically sustainable city-building. It is no longer a secret in most quarters that sprawl is an economic drag on our cities. For some reason, you, "most people you know", and much of our current leadership haven't caught up yet. Fortunately Cooke seems to be catching on.

For the record, I'm neutral on Cooke at the moment, and looking for reasons to support him should he seek to revive his political career. I've spoken with him and he seems like a perfectly nice guy. He certainly is talking the talk these days, but I'm reserving my judgment til I see whether he walks the walk, which will include whether he tries to oust McHattie again. His latest column is a positive sign.
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  #58  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 7:22 PM
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Seems a bit harsh...he was the first major public figure to call for the elimination of one-way streets, has strongly supported LRT and he pushed densification back in the 80's...so you disagree with him on Red Hill..move on, its over..as for Cooke reviving his political career, he tells anybody that cares to ask him that he has zero interest in returning to politics..
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  #59  
Old Posted May 25, 2009, 7:48 PM
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And also advocated for bike lanes on King and Main. Eventually it was City Council that stopped Cooke's plan for the bike plans (hence why you got bike lanes on the 403 overpass bridges).
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  #60  
Old Posted May 26, 2009, 7:35 AM
bigguy1231 bigguy1231 is offline
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Originally Posted by oldcoote View Post
I wonder who knows more people?

Because most people I know think McHattie is a hard working and selfless individual, and easily the best councillor at City Hall. (Not too difficult mind you).

Hmmm, I guess the votes will tell the story ... oh wait ... nevermind
Let me correct my statement, most people I know think his ideas are a joke. I have no doubt he is a hard working and selfless. In my experience, most politicians are very hard working and selfless. My intent wasn't to impune him personally just his policies. I am sure he is probably a very nice guy.

As for who I know, and what I know, I volunteered my time on various committees at city hall for about 15 years. So I do know alot of people at city hall. I worked with a number of people now in management positions when they were just starting out at city hall. I've also worked on more political campaigns over the last 30 years than I care to remember. I have friends of all political stripes, some still involved and others who have moved on. So I do think I have a pretty good handle on what people are thinking in this city at all levels of government.
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