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  #61  
Old Posted Jul 9, 2006, 8:47 AM
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BTW, I think the USA Highrise Construction list. (295ft+, and construction began in 2006), might be in error with Endeavour. It says Pasadena, TX. But I'm pretty sure that is Seabrook.
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  #62  
Old Posted Jul 10, 2006, 8:05 PM
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Thanks Ofcourse, I'll get them added to the databases.
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  #63  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2006, 2:39 AM
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I just found this. This is one of the failed original renderings for Los Corales. I don't like the barf salmon color or the East side part, but I like the height and the penthouses at the top. Which do you all like better - the design that is going to be built or this failed rendering? Just wondering.

http://www.loscoralesspi.com/index.htm


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Last edited by OfCourse; Jul 11, 2006 at 2:46 AM.
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  #64  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2006, 2:43 AM
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These two will certainly stand out considering they are far away from most everything on the Island.



http://www.loscoralesspi.com/Map.htm
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  #65  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2006, 3:32 AM
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Well, heightwise definitely the first proposal. It looks like they revised their proposal quite a bit. I'm thinking I like the original design more. BUT, I think the new design fits in better with South Padre Island's skyline. The old design though, wow, 27 floors. That would look good in Houston or Dallas, even Galveston depending on the location.
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  #66  
Old Posted Jul 11, 2006, 4:00 AM
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Very cool info, Ofc.

But Kevin, I have to disagree with you. Though the original buildings were much taller, I think there design was horrendous.
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  #67  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2006, 12:50 AM
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Pointe West Condos and Beach Club

The first phase is now open on the far West end of Galveston Island. Here's a look...












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  #68  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2006, 3:14 PM
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Downtown Beaux Art Building

Regatta Galveston Towers

Diamond Beach Galveston


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  #69  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2006, 8:51 PM
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^^^ Wow, they're all nice. SPI should take some notes.
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  #70  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2006, 11:06 PM
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Gulf Coast Real Estate Articles

Thought you guys might find this of interest. The following are articles appearing in this morning's Austin American-Statesman about the hot Texas Gulf Coast real eastate market, particularly Galveston and Port Aransas:

First Article, Galveston:

http://www.statesman.com/business/co...22coastal.html

Growth wave hits Galveston

Signs of transformation mingle with small-town charms in coastal community.

By Shonda Novak
AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF
Saturday, July 22, 2006



The twin 27-story towers of the Palisades Palms condominium project rise above Galveston's East Beach. How hot is the market here on the Gulf Coast? Of the project's 288 condos, 237 already are sold.


GALVESTON — It's all still there.

Institutions such as Gaido's, serving fresh seafood since 1911. Timeworn hotels. Oceanfront beachwear stores and tackle shops. Stately historic mansions. Balmy brown saltwater and the sense of calm that comes as the Gulf of Mexico announces itself and the rest of Texas disappears behind the causeway into town.

Galveston retains much of its old character and charm, just as it has for decades.

But there are jarring signs that a transformation is under way in this coastal city of 60,000 southeast of Houston.

Two giant cranes — not the avian variety — soar over the island's eastern end, where twin luxury condominium high-rises are under way.
Signs hawking $500,000 residences are posted on the Mayflower Inn, which will be razed to make way for the luxury Tuscany Beachfront Condominiums on Seawall Boulevard. Elsewhere along the eastern seawall, Emerald By the Sea is rising, a 15-story condominium with units called Topaz, Diamond, Princess, Sapphire and Ruby.

On the west end of the city, the lime-green-and-white 10-story Ocean Grove Condominiums urge prospective buyers to call 1-866-SEE-GULF. Developers are charting a new course for Galveston, one that is bringing high-rises, new businesses, more residents and new challenges for city leaders. The surge of new development is ushering in new businesses, including chain restaurants overlooking the Gulf of Mexico such as Chili's, Saltgrass Steak House and soon, a Hooters.

Residential development, propelled by an aging population looking for retirement, second-home and resort properties near saltwater, is also booming: An additional 9,500 residential units are expected to be built here by 2014.

"Islandwide, we have not seen this rate and growth of development since post 1900," said Alicia Foyt, public information officer for the City of Galveston, referring to what locals call the "Great Storm" — the hurricane that destroyed many of the homes and killed more than 6,000 people at the turn of the century.

Last year, the city issued building permits for new residential and commercial construction valued at $2.5 billion. During the first five months of this year, the value more than doubled, with $5.3 billion worth of new construction permitted.

Brandon Wade, Galveston's assistant city manager, said the city is prepared to meet this growth head-on.

"We have been working diligently since 1996 to prepare for potential development on the island," Wade said. "Major expansions of our water system and sewer system have been necessary in order to address the demands today. Had we not started 10 years ago to expand our infrastructure, we would not have been able to keep up with the explosive development."

The city completed about $25 million in water and sewer improvements, Wade said. The city is now implementing a $30 million water and sewer bond program, and plans to begin charging developers and customers fees for new water and sewer taps to offset the cost of expanding city services.

"We have approximately $125 million in additional infrastructure needs on the five- to 10-year horizon," Wade said. "It is a very busy time for all of us at the City of Galveston."

The signs of what's to come aren't hard to miss.

Of the more than a dozen mid- and high-rise projects being built or planned, the highest-profile are the twin 27-story condo towers, Palisade Palms, under construction on the far east end of the island.

Other than an adjacent 14-story project, the Palisade Palms being developed by Houston-based Falcon Group is on a part of the island that has remained largely undeveloped — until now. It is the first residential project on East Beach since the 1980s, but it's not likely to be the last.

Falcon Group has purchased adjacent acreage for future projects, including more residential towers.
Of Palisade Palms' 288 condos, 237 already are sold, with Texans snapping up more than half of those units.

One of those is Austin software engineer Tai Ly, who is buying a $700,000 condominium on the 24th floor of one tower. He and his family moved to Central Texas from San Jose, Calif., two years ago and plan to use the condo as a summer getaway. Like many buyers, Ly views his Palisades condo as an investment. He settled on Galveston after ruling out overheated markets in Florida and Hawaii.

"Galveston right now is the best deal I can find," Ly said. He expects the condo's value to climb by $300,000 in the next five years.
Many areas along the East and West Coasts have seen sharp run-ups in property values and home sale prices.

As a result, many home buyers are looking at alternative locations, such as Galveston, said Arnold Tauch, Falcon Group's president and chief executive, in a Houston Business Journal article last year.
Jim Gaines, a research economist with the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University, confirmed the trend.

"If you want to buy anywhere up or down the East or West coasts, the market is extremely expensive, much more expensive than the Gulf Coast," Gaines said. "We're hearing that people from the East and West coasts are discovering the Third Coast because it's the only coast that has 'affordable' prices."

The remaining units in Palisade Palms range in price from $430,000 to $1.6 million, with the average unit selling for about $425 a square foot. By comparison, Falcon Group officials say, residential towers in Miami are selling for $1,200 to $1,500 a square foot.

Ly opted for a unit in a high-rise, seeing it as less vulnerable than a house during a hurricane, although he said he's not overly concerned about the storm threat. "We lived in California for 12 years, and you don't know when an earthquake will strike," Ly said. "A hurricane is a very manageable risk."

For longtime residents, the surge in development is a double-edged sword.
"There's a lot of construction, new buildings, new people moving in," said Mercedes Cortez, who was born on the island in 1940. "That's good for the economy."
But like many sizzling real estate markets across the country, property taxes in Galveston are rising along with home prices.

In 2001, Galveston's median home sales price was $115,750. So far this year, the median stands at $186,750, according to the Galveston Association of Realtors.

The 65-year-old Cortez said she pays nearly $3,200 a year in property taxes, up 42 percent since 2001; another resident said his property taxes have doubled in the past seven years.

"It's just staggering," said Cortez, who is on a fixed income. "If this house wasn't paid for, I don't think I could afford to live here." Driving along her tree-canopied street in Galveston's desirable and nationally recognized East End Historic District, Cortez points out several houses that Houston residents have purchased as second homes. On a nearby street, six houses are for sale with prices from $425,000 to $475,000.

Like her neighbors, Cortez also has thought about selling her home, one of the few left standing after the 1900 hurricane. But, so far, she always has reconsidered.

"I love my house," said Cortez, who inherited the home from her parents. "That house has seen and held a lot of people, a lot of memories."
The growth also has a negative effect on the environment, said Bob Stokes, president of the Galveston Bay Foundation, a nonprofit conservation group.

"Habitat loss, from wetlands to coastal prairie to uplands, is already the biggest issue facing Galveston Bay," Stokes said. "It really impacts all the bird and fish species that live on and around Galveston Island. Basically they're losing places to live."

Conservation groups have been working to acquire some large tracts to preserve as parks or open space, but skyrocketing property values have made this a difficult proposition, Stokes said.
For Steven Creitz, who lived in Austin for 23 years before moving to Galveston in 2003, the city today is what Austin was like in 1981.

"Galveston is a really cool place — it's hip, it's got it going on," Creitz said. "It's Texas' best-kept secret that everybody is finding out about now." Creitz is spending about $60,000 to renovate a 750-square-foot house in the East End Historic District. He paid $70,000 for the 136-year-old home in August 2005, buying it from owners who paid about $20,000 five years ago. He expects the house to triple in value in the next four years.

Like many locals, resident Nina McKenzie, 21, hopes Galveston's building boom doesn't ruin the city's edgy character and supplant its local hole-in-the-walls with an overabundance of national chains.

"I hope it stays raw," she said. "We like the brown sand and the murky water. Even though it isn't perfect, it's still home."
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  #71  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2006, 11:11 PM
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Port Aransas/Mustang Island

Next Article, Port Aransas and Mustang Island:

http://www.statesman.com/business/co...22mustang.html

Mustang Island braces for a wave of retirees

Fishing villages, birding centers will make way for condos, golf courses.

By Rich Oppel
AMERICAN-STATESMAN EDITOR
Saturday, July 22, 2006


PORT ARANSAS — Alan and Kim Fon of Round Rock so loved being near the Gulf that in 2000 they bought a second home in Island Moorings, a yacht club and marina community on the southern end of Port Aransas.
But when Alan, an executive with Dell Inc., was transferred to Atlanta, the couple had to sell the house.

When it seemed as if they would return to Texas last year, they began looking at lakefront properties in Central Texas.
Then Kim Fon received an e-mail from a Port Aransas friend: "Don't know if you'd be interested, but your old home here is about to go on the market."
The next morning, Kim was on a plane. They are now retired — he's 50, she's 49 — and living full time in Port Aransas.

"I really didn't look at this as retirement," he said. "I looked at this as an opportunity to do what I want to do next. I see it more as a transitory place."

The Fons are among the early arrivals in a wave of baby boomers and early retirees expected to transform Mustang Island and its environs from historic fishing villages and birding centers into retirement communities, golf resorts and condominium towers.

Port Aransas anchors the north end of the 18-mile-long Mustang Island, a barrier island near Corpus Christi.
Growth and the expectation of growth are driving up real estate prices along the glistening quartz sand beaches.

While growth brings jobs, it is starting to overwhelm the village's storm sewers and clog the roads — locals joke that making a left turn in this three-light town has become an unforgivable sin. Environmentalists warn that the growth threatens the island's delicate balance.

Along Texas 361 south of Island Moorings, a golf resort called Newport is being developed by Sunny Castor of Port Aransas and Craig Millard, retired president of Merrill Lynch Real Estate. They are partners in Texas Gulf & Land Harbor Ltd.

Their plans include hotels, a marina, an Arnold Palmer golf course and 4,000 residential units. Condominiums will be offered from $400,000 to $1 million, houses from $500,000 to "millions," said Millard, who lives in Palm Beach, Fla.

He hears the boomers' footsteps.
"I saw a recent report that 78 million baby boomers are about to retire, and 71 percent want to live near salt water," he said. "For the first couple of years, this land will be affordable by coastal standards. That will not last."

On each day in 2006, 7,918 people will turn 60, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Their average household income ranges from $56,500 for those born between 1956 and 1964, to $58,889 for those born from 1946 to 1955, according to Met Life.
The growth on Mustang Island already is putting pressure on residents like 28-year-old Christina Williams, a front-desk supervisor at an older condominium in Port Aransas.

She and her longtime boyfriend, who runs a lawn service, share a house in downtown Port Aransas. The house was valued by tax officials at $64,000 in 2003. They have just received a preliminary 2006 valuation of $129,081.
Can they afford to stay? "Probably not in the next 10 years, not on the pay we get," she said.

Among many in the service and construction industries, there is fear that rising prices will force them off the island. That's why Williams was pleased when Claude Brown was elected mayor May 15. The 48-year-old Brown is the son of a cowboy who herded cattle in the prairie grasses of Mustang Island.

Brown is a suntanned and sturdy man with penetrating blue eyes. He works as a commercial diver, welder and maker of boat trailers and served on the City Council before he ousted the incumbent mayor.
"It's to the point now where working people can't afford to be here," Brown said. "I tried to make (the issue) real shiny for City Council: If you make $10 an hour and pay $1,600 a month for a place to live and utilities, there's nothing left to eat on or drive in."


Growing prosperity


Prosperity abounds in Port Aransas. Restaurants such as the Venetian Hot Plate charge up to $32.95 an entree. Pre-construction contracts on condos where rickety boat sheds once stood are being purchased for up to $1 million.

Despite this growing prosperity, the town and surrounding coastal areas retain evidence of their working-class roots. Rusting trailers can be found in the center of town, and most mornings supply boats rumble out to oil rigs in the Gulf with replacement workers and gear.
Tattooed and tanned men and women still snooze in pickups parked alongside pop-up tents on the beach.

Yet development pressures are increasing, in part because Mustang Island offers one of the few stretches along the Gulf Coast open to development.
Texas has a coastline of 375 miles. As of 2003, 56 miles were developed and 26 miles, much of it on Mustang Island, were available for development, according to State Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson.

National seashore land, wildlife refuges and parks make up 143 miles, and the remaining 150 miles is considered "coastal barrier resource" lands that won't be developed because they are not eligible for federally subsidized insurance.
Because of this, Port Aransas is "absolutely exploding," said Ann Vaughan, executive director of the Chamber of Commerce. This in turn is driving up housing prices.

Between 1995 and 2005, the price of the average house lot increased more than 600 percent, from $19,264 to $141,991. At the same time, the average sales price for houses increased more than 200 percent, from $109,321 to $354,110, while prices for condos increased more than 160 percent from $75,303 to $199,296. The rental rate for two-bedroom beach condos now averages $250-$350 a night, says Bud Baker, general manager of The Dunes Condominiums. He predicts that rates will rise 2 percent to 3 percent per year.

Port Aransas is connected to the mainland by six Texas Department of Transportation ferries. The free trip takes three minutes, but during peak commuting times lines can stretch for two miles, with the wait taking an hour, said Mayor Brown said.

Said Vaughan: "It scares me when I think of the service personnel it will take to accommodate the growth. Right now, merchants are at their wit's end" because it is so difficult to hire people.


Ecosystem affected


How all of this affects the delicate balance of the barrier island's ecosystem concerns Tony Amos. A research fellow at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Amos has surveyed a 7.5-mile stretch of beach about once every two days for 29 years. His findings are mixed.

Great blue herons are down. Piping plovers are relatively stable. People are up. Way up. Milk jugs are down, but plastic bottles are up.
Cars are down because, said Amos, "the condo is becoming the main method of access" to the beach.

The people this development attracts do not always understand the consequences of their behavior on the island's wildlife, Amos said.
They let their dogs chase the plovers and feed Cheetos to the laughing gulls. They complain that the sargasso weed, which piles up along the beach, stinks and impedes their walk to the water's edge.
So city and county officials respond by sending front-end loaders to scoop the grass and pile it atop dunes.

Long term, that's a problem, Amos contends. The grass captures sand while on the flat beach, and provides nutrients for birds. Plowing back the grass changes the character of the dunes, a defense line against storms. The weed and sand might bury turtle nests.
"I believe it will decrease the natural diversity of life on the beach," Amos said.

As for those big developments, "the coastal prairie is about to disappear," he added. "Some people think it looks better landscaped."
City Manager Michael Kovacs, 33, said he is working to balance growth amid the influx of new residents. Expanding the city's storm sewer system is a priority. On one recent day when the city was drenched by 4 inches of rain, water stood axle-deep in many streets.

Some streets, sewers and other infrastructure will be built over time. But don't expect suburban-like amenities: Environmental considerations limit the island's ability to install infrastructure.

Yet that isn't stopping the influx of new residents and developers.
"We've been found," Kovacs said. "We have national developers really interested in doing something here."


Rich Oppel has been visiting the Texas coast for more than a decade and recently purchased a condo at Port Aransas.
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  #72  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2006, 4:30 AM
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I have mixed feelings about the growth in Port Aransas. Call me a nimby if you must. I love that place and would hate to see it change and hustle and bustle. My family has been going down there for over 35 years going fishing and going to the beach. Now, the skyscraper geek in me says yes, build some, while at the sametime I'd hate to see it change much. I love the place. Outside of Austin I feel most at home in Port Aransas. I love the slow paced atmosphere and laid back feel of the place.
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Old Posted Jul 23, 2006, 5:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrownsvilleTx
^Yeah, like the rest of the US coast isn't polluted yet people swim and live near the sea. But I don't hear you complaining about the other coastlines!

How bout the air you breathe where you live, full of particulates from all the pollution from the northern part of the country, especially when the wind blows south. From all the industries, power plants, etc. You may not see it but it's there.

I really think your comment was off base here. Stick to the thread next time.
How the hell was that off topic? We're talking about shore development in Texas. I think the texas coasts environment is extremely relevent.

Plano air sucks... That doesn't change my previous opinion at all. Now that's 'off base'.

____________

anyway nice stuff.
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  #74  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2006, 10:22 PM
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This project will occupy prime Seawall Boulevard property and overlook the beach and Gulf of Mexico. Containing 250 units of varying square footages and types, the project will also incorporate amenities such as separate adult and child pools, an exercise/fitness center, spa and theater facility. A planned Phase Two will add 100 additional units to the site.

Seahorse Condos - Galveston





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  #75  
Old Posted Sep 9, 2006, 2:21 AM
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Quote:
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Beachtown Galveston













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  #76  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 12:07 PM
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Wow, this is pretty!

Quote:
The 500-unit high-rise condominium near Mustang Island State Park will be called Maravilla Del Mar, said Pat Walters, managing partner of Mustang Island Investment, LLC, a group of Wisconsin mortgage brokers who are the developers on the project. Plans call for the development to include three buildings, each more than 30 stories high.

......

As envisioned, Maravilla Del Mar will consist of three buildings on about 23 acres of land just north of Mustang Island State Park, Underbrink said. The tallest building is expected to be 34 to 36 stories high, and the buildings on each side of that structure will be 32 to 34 stories. That would make all three buildings higher than any building in Corpus Christi or the surrounding area.
http://corpuschristi-portaransas.ali...a-del-Mar.aspx

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Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 1:08 PM
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Quote:
Development to change skyline
Proposed Mustang Island resort boasts tallest structures in area
BY DAN PARKER SOUTH JETTY REPORTER

An architectural rendering of a high-rise condominium complex being planned for property just north of Mustang Island State Park. The sketch says "42+ main structure," but that is outdated information, according to David Underbrink, the project engineer. Also, the buildings don't look like they're more than 12 stories high, the way they're drawn in the sketch. Underbrink said developers expect the main building to be 34 to 36 stories high and the buildings on each side to be 32 to 34 stories high, Underbrink said. That still would make them the tallest buildings in the Coastal Bend. The tallest building at One Shoreline Plaza in Corpus Christi is 28 stories high.
Developers are planning to build the three tallest buildings in the entire Coastal Bend on Mustang Island.

The 500-unit high-rise condominium near Mustang Island State Park will be called Maravilla Del Mar, said Pat Walters, managing partner of Mustang Island Investment, LLC, a group of Wisconsin mortgage brokers who are the developers on the project. Plans call for the development to include three buildings, each more than 30 stories high.

David Underbrink, the project engineer, said the developers "are not interested in a total ban for traffic" on the beach in front of the development. The developers will seek to have bollards installed to limit traffic to an area near the dunes in the same style as beaches in Port Aransas, said Underbrink, who is with Naismith Engineering in Corpus Christi.

Walters, too, said he wants to see some sort of traffic control including some no-parking areas. But, he said, "we have no intentions of requesting a (vehicle) ban."

The development has a Web site: www.maravilladelmar.com. On one page of the site, it says:

"Reserve the most beautiful sunrises and sunsets that one can imagine at your own condominium resort on Mustang Island. Miles of gorgeous, private beach frontage and incredible panoramic views of the Gulf of Mexico await you."

Asked if the Maravilla Del Mar really will seek to make the adjacent beach "private," with only condominium owners and their guests allowed, Walters said the development will not do that.

Walters said the word "private" was "probably a typo, to be honest, or a misinterpretation by our marketing firm." He said he would have the word "private" removed from the Web page.

As envisioned, Maravilla Del Mar will consist of three buildings on about 23 acres of land just north of Mustang Island State Park, Underbrink said. The tallest building is expected to be 34 to 36 stories high, and the buildings on each side of that structure will be 32 to 34 stories, he said. That would make all three buildings higher than any building in Corpus Christi or the surrounding area, Underbrink said.

The tallest building at One Shoreline Plaza, which dominates the Corpus Christi skyline, is 28 stories.

"The reason (Maravilla Del Mar) is going up is, they're also including a lot of amenities outdoors that take up space, so they had to build up in order to allow that," Underbrink said. "They have three different swimming pools, one has a (large) slide for the kids, there's a big deck that goes along with those pools, places where you can sit outside and eat.

"This is a five-star resort, and it's meant to be a place where people can go, and they don't have to leave while they're there," Underbrink said. "Everything will be provided for them. There'll be spas, exercise rooms, restaurants, little shops where you can buy groceries, corner store-type shops."

Developers still must obtain a dune permit from the county and a building permit from the city, according to county and city officials.

The developer is seeking a building permit from the city of Corpus Christi because the development is planned for a portion of Mustang Island that is inside the Corpus Christi city limits.

Underbrink said the developers "are in the feasibility portion of the project. They are trying to make sure there are not bugaboos, no fatal flaws that will prevent them from developing. They're looking at permitting, how they can use the land, any constraints to that usage."

The developers are expected to close on the property in December,

Underbrink said. Walters confirmed that but would not say who the seller is other than to say the owner is from the Corpus Christi area.

Construction likely will begin in mid-2007, Underbrink said. Project officials hope to open the development for business in summer 2009, but sales of condo units might take place before that.

The development will include one- two- and three-bedroom condominiums. Total value: About $350 million, Underbrink said.

Asked how much the condominiums might cost, Walters said market studies have shown one-bedroom units could be "in the $400,000 range" and penthouses about $1.5 million.

Walters said plans for the development are much more than just talk.

"We have been in discussions with a number of very large national developers to work with to build this project," Walters said. "We have spent about a year and a half so far researching, getting approvals in place, invested a large amount of money, and we are very confident this structure will be built."

Underbrink said the dredging of Packery Channel was not the lynchpin for the decision to go forward with the project.

"The prices in Florida have gotten so high that the land and the cost to build (in the Coastal Bend) is much more reasonable, and I think that is what has brought people to this coast," Underbrink said. "Packery just happened to line up in the same time frame."

The Nueces County Commissioners Court is scheduled to consider a dune permit for the development during the court's regular meeting scheduled for Nov. 15.

Asked about his opinion of the planned Maravilla Del Mar, Commissioner Chuck Cazalas said, "I am hopeful that a reasoned development will occur on the island without developing into a Miami Beach or unduly disturbing wildlife habitat." Cazalas represents Precinct 4, which includes Port Aransas and the area where Maravilla Del Mar is planned.

Asked whether he thinks Maravilla Del Mar will be good or bad for Mustang Island, Cazalas said, "I think it's a huge development, and it will have an impact."

Nueces County Water Control and Improvement District No. 4 met with the developer earlier this year, said Mary Moss, district manager of the agency. The district has ample water and sewer services for the development, Moss said.

Walters said Mustang Island represents "a golden opportunity" for his development group.

"We've looked at a large number of projects," Walters said. "We've done a market study, and we specifically test marketed local to Texas and did some national surveys and received a very warm response to the project."
http://www.portasouthjetty.com/news/..._Page/006.html
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  #78  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 2:28 PM
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KevinFromTexas KevinFromTexas is offline
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^ That project is going to be amazing. If it really will be the tallest along the Texas coast, we're talking about it being over 470 feet tall then. Currently Corpus Christi has the tallest at 411 feet with 28 floors. South Padre Island is currently building a new tallest that will be 470 feet with 25 floors. These will easily show up in view from across the bay in Downtown Corpus Christi.

Thanks for that article, OfCourse.


EDIT: So these will actually be inside the Corpus Christi city limits?
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  #79  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2006, 8:38 AM
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I'm not sure...I was looking it up and the property has a Port Aransas address...but the article says they had to get permits from CC b/c the part of Mustang Island the development will be on is inside CC city limits. Hmmm!
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  #80  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2006, 3:33 AM
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Looks like this project will be a go:

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Mustang resort gets approval
High-rise construction could begin this summer

By Jaime Powell Caller-Times
December 13, 2006


Mustang Island's first skyscraper - a $350 million resort development - will move forward after Nueces County Commissioners voted Tuesday to grant a permit necessary for construction on the condition that the city address questions about the project from the General Land Office.

The 35-story, 500-unit resort will offer one-, two- and three-bedroom condos for an estimated $750,000 or more and will include tennis courts, a children's water park, health spa, boardwalk to the beach and multi-level covered parking.

http://www.caller.com/ccct/local_new...210540,00.html
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