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  #201  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 8:17 PM
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Victory, looking forward one year with the announced projects

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  #202  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 8:17 PM
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Victory, looking forward one year with the announced projects

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  #203  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 8:20 PM
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GlobeSt.com EXCLUSIVE: Forest City Plying $100M-Plus CBD Plan
By Connie Gore
Last updated: November 17, 2004 07:57am

DALLAS-Forest City Enterprises Inc. has gone hard on contracts for roughly 1.4 million sf of longtime vacant vintage space in the Dallas CBD. Though the redevelopment hinges on city assistance, the Cleveland-based master craftsman of urban projects is shooting for a late 2005 construction start. "The two deals will be over $100 million," David J. Levey, executive vice president for Forest City Residential Group Inc., tells GlobeSt.com. His plans for the Mercantile complex, four empty buildings with close to 1.1 million sf on one block, and its neighbor across the way, the 304,860-sf Continental Building, call for 400 to 600 apartments and a spattering of gallery-type, specialty retail.

RTKL Associates Inc. of Dallas is working on the design as Levey and team work through a complicated due diligence and continue talks with city officials about contributing to the redevelopment plan. Levey says the goal is to close the sales with Spire Realty of Houston and Glenn Solomon of Dallas by mid-2005. Sources confirm there has been preliminary discussion about expanding the $108-million tax increment financing coffer by another $50 million. Most of the funds from the initial seed money to revitalize the downtown have been committed although a small chunk was in place at one time for the Mercantile complex, which Spire Realty bought in 2000 from Principal Financial Group of Des Moines. Less than a year later, Solomon paid close to $10 million to Principal for the Continental Building at 1810 Commerce St.

Levey says the Forest City plan calls for a mix of renovated Art Deco space and new product, for sale or for rent, interspersed with "festive" retail. The centerpiece to "the Merc," as it's known around town, is a 359,348-sf, 31-story building at 1704 Main St., built in 1942 and the only US high rise that rose during World War II. The rest of the block holds a 347,037-sf structure, built in 1958 at 1807 Commerce St.; 213,270-sf, 55-year-old building at 1802 Main St.; and 116,322-sf building, which rose in 1972 at 1808 Main St.

Levey says Jack Gosnell with United Commercial Realty in Dallas spent a year selling Dallas' story to the Forest City decision-makers, whose forte is repositioning distressed urban neighborhoods into successful mixed-use developments. The talks started with "the Merc" and then included the Continental, which comes equipped with 380 underground parking spaces and a connection to the pedestrian tunnel system linking most of the CBD buildings. Levey says there are numerous hurdles to jump before the sales can close. "Dallas has great potential," he says. "I think Dallas is one big urban center and it's just slow in coming along." The project, which still is without a name, won't become reality without the city's help, he says, citing the high price to buy and develop a mixed-use project of the Merc's magnitude. "It just can't," he stresses. "The economics are what they are."
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  #204  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 8:20 PM
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GlobeSt.com EXCLUSIVE: Forest City Plying $100M-Plus CBD Plan
By Connie Gore
Last updated: November 17, 2004 07:57am

DALLAS-Forest City Enterprises Inc. has gone hard on contracts for roughly 1.4 million sf of longtime vacant vintage space in the Dallas CBD. Though the redevelopment hinges on city assistance, the Cleveland-based master craftsman of urban projects is shooting for a late 2005 construction start. "The two deals will be over $100 million," David J. Levey, executive vice president for Forest City Residential Group Inc., tells GlobeSt.com. His plans for the Mercantile complex, four empty buildings with close to 1.1 million sf on one block, and its neighbor across the way, the 304,860-sf Continental Building, call for 400 to 600 apartments and a spattering of gallery-type, specialty retail.

RTKL Associates Inc. of Dallas is working on the design as Levey and team work through a complicated due diligence and continue talks with city officials about contributing to the redevelopment plan. Levey says the goal is to close the sales with Spire Realty of Houston and Glenn Solomon of Dallas by mid-2005. Sources confirm there has been preliminary discussion about expanding the $108-million tax increment financing coffer by another $50 million. Most of the funds from the initial seed money to revitalize the downtown have been committed although a small chunk was in place at one time for the Mercantile complex, which Spire Realty bought in 2000 from Principal Financial Group of Des Moines. Less than a year later, Solomon paid close to $10 million to Principal for the Continental Building at 1810 Commerce St.

Levey says the Forest City plan calls for a mix of renovated Art Deco space and new product, for sale or for rent, interspersed with "festive" retail. The centerpiece to "the Merc," as it's known around town, is a 359,348-sf, 31-story building at 1704 Main St., built in 1942 and the only US high rise that rose during World War II. The rest of the block holds a 347,037-sf structure, built in 1958 at 1807 Commerce St.; 213,270-sf, 55-year-old building at 1802 Main St.; and 116,322-sf building, which rose in 1972 at 1808 Main St.

Levey says Jack Gosnell with United Commercial Realty in Dallas spent a year selling Dallas' story to the Forest City decision-makers, whose forte is repositioning distressed urban neighborhoods into successful mixed-use developments. The talks started with "the Merc" and then included the Continental, which comes equipped with 380 underground parking spaces and a connection to the pedestrian tunnel system linking most of the CBD buildings. Levey says there are numerous hurdles to jump before the sales can close. "Dallas has great potential," he says. "I think Dallas is one big urban center and it's just slow in coming along." The project, which still is without a name, won't become reality without the city's help, he says, citing the high price to buy and develop a mixed-use project of the Merc's magnitude. "It just can't," he stresses. "The economics are what they are."
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  #205  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 8:24 PM
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Luxury hotel to rise at Mockingbird-Central
Retail-condo complex to replace former Hilton
09:27 PM CST on Monday, November 8, 2004
By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...lton.db9a2.html

Developers have bought the aging Hilton Inn – more recently called Hotel Santa Fe – at Mockingbird Lane and North Central Expressway and plan to turn it into a luxury hotel, shopping and condo complex. Work on the $80 million project will start before the end of the year and includes a 10-story residential high-rise. The original 1960s hotel tower will be renovated to be operated by San Francisco's exclusive Kimpton Hotels. The redevelopment will also contain about 25,000 square feet of lower-level retail with loft-style condos above it in a low-rise building facing Mockingbird Lane.

Realty America Group

The complex at Mockingbird Lane and Central Expressway will feature a hotel, shopping center and high-rise condos. "We want to return this property to its glory days," said Kip Sowden, principal with Realty America Group, which bought the property on Monday in partnership with Behringer Harvard Funds. "We don't think there is a better location in Dallas-Fort Worth than the corner of Mockingbird and Central." Developers are hurrying to catch up with what they see as immediate demand for hotel rooms and housing. Since DART opened its light-rail station at the intersection in 1996, the surrounding neighborhood has increased in importance. The popular Mockingbird Station retail, cinema and apartment complex is just across the street, and new rental units have been built nearby.

But the old Hilton Inn has languished. Since 1993, it has been owned by the Maharishi School of Vedic Science, founded by 1960s spiritual icon Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It was still operating as Hotel Santa Fe until Monday, when the staff and guests were notified that it would close immediately. Other developers had tried to buy the hotel from the Maharishi and redevelop it without success. One sale that fell through resulted in a lawsuit. "That site really does deserve a premier development given the location, and it's on public transit," said investor Robert Behringer. "We've looked at this property for years, but we didn't have the patience to reel this one in. "When Realty America told us that they had control of this property and were interested in a partnership with us, we were very excited," he said.

Construction plans

Demolition will start within 45 days. The new owners will turn the nine-story hotel – built in 1967 – into the 185-room Hotel Palomar. Low-rise buildings just south of the hotel will be demolished to make way for the 60-unit, 10-story condo high-rise. There's also room on the 5.5-acre site for a third condo building, developers say. Allie Beth Allman & Associates Realtors has already started marketing the building and has about 10 presales. The condos will range in price from about $300,000 to more than $1 million, said agent Kyle Crews. "We expect the sales to go very fast," Mr. Crews said. "The success of the W and Ritz-Carlton hotel and condo buildings have proven the success of this concept."

The W Dallas Victory Hotel and Residences are under construction across from American Airlines Center, and the Residences at the Ritz-Carlton are planned for a site in Uptown. Developer Ken Hughes, who built Mockingbird Station, said the project will be a boost for the area. "It's very significant, and it should cause more things to happen," he said. "Kimpton is a great boutique hotel operator."

High marks for manager

Founded in 1981, Kimpton has 38 hotels in North America. The company recently opened hotels in San Francisco, Boston and New York and has a hotel under construction in San Diego. "After we studied Kimpton, we knew they were just the right hotel group to bring in for their first project in Texas," said Jeff Berry of Realty America Group. Dallas-based Three Architecture designed the new buildings and drew up plans for redeveloping the original tower, which was designed by noted local architect Ralph Kelman. Construction should be under way by the first quarter, and the entire project is set to be finished in April 2006.

"We have waited a long time for the development of this property, and this is the perfect opportunity," said Dallas City Council member Veletta Forsythe Lill. "This area is poised for great things, and I know the neighbors will be pleased to see this happening." Behringer Harvard Funds, which underwrites national real-estate investment funds, also recently bought several Dallas-area office buildings.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com

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  #206  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 8:24 PM
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Luxury hotel to rise at Mockingbird-Central
Retail-condo complex to replace former Hilton
09:27 PM CST on Monday, November 8, 2004
By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...lton.db9a2.html

Developers have bought the aging Hilton Inn – more recently called Hotel Santa Fe – at Mockingbird Lane and North Central Expressway and plan to turn it into a luxury hotel, shopping and condo complex. Work on the $80 million project will start before the end of the year and includes a 10-story residential high-rise. The original 1960s hotel tower will be renovated to be operated by San Francisco's exclusive Kimpton Hotels. The redevelopment will also contain about 25,000 square feet of lower-level retail with loft-style condos above it in a low-rise building facing Mockingbird Lane.

Realty America Group

The complex at Mockingbird Lane and Central Expressway will feature a hotel, shopping center and high-rise condos. "We want to return this property to its glory days," said Kip Sowden, principal with Realty America Group, which bought the property on Monday in partnership with Behringer Harvard Funds. "We don't think there is a better location in Dallas-Fort Worth than the corner of Mockingbird and Central." Developers are hurrying to catch up with what they see as immediate demand for hotel rooms and housing. Since DART opened its light-rail station at the intersection in 1996, the surrounding neighborhood has increased in importance. The popular Mockingbird Station retail, cinema and apartment complex is just across the street, and new rental units have been built nearby.

But the old Hilton Inn has languished. Since 1993, it has been owned by the Maharishi School of Vedic Science, founded by 1960s spiritual icon Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. It was still operating as Hotel Santa Fe until Monday, when the staff and guests were notified that it would close immediately. Other developers had tried to buy the hotel from the Maharishi and redevelop it without success. One sale that fell through resulted in a lawsuit. "That site really does deserve a premier development given the location, and it's on public transit," said investor Robert Behringer. "We've looked at this property for years, but we didn't have the patience to reel this one in. "When Realty America told us that they had control of this property and were interested in a partnership with us, we were very excited," he said.

Construction plans

Demolition will start within 45 days. The new owners will turn the nine-story hotel – built in 1967 – into the 185-room Hotel Palomar. Low-rise buildings just south of the hotel will be demolished to make way for the 60-unit, 10-story condo high-rise. There's also room on the 5.5-acre site for a third condo building, developers say. Allie Beth Allman & Associates Realtors has already started marketing the building and has about 10 presales. The condos will range in price from about $300,000 to more than $1 million, said agent Kyle Crews. "We expect the sales to go very fast," Mr. Crews said. "The success of the W and Ritz-Carlton hotel and condo buildings have proven the success of this concept."

The W Dallas Victory Hotel and Residences are under construction across from American Airlines Center, and the Residences at the Ritz-Carlton are planned for a site in Uptown. Developer Ken Hughes, who built Mockingbird Station, said the project will be a boost for the area. "It's very significant, and it should cause more things to happen," he said. "Kimpton is a great boutique hotel operator."

High marks for manager

Founded in 1981, Kimpton has 38 hotels in North America. The company recently opened hotels in San Francisco, Boston and New York and has a hotel under construction in San Diego. "After we studied Kimpton, we knew they were just the right hotel group to bring in for their first project in Texas," said Jeff Berry of Realty America Group. Dallas-based Three Architecture designed the new buildings and drew up plans for redeveloping the original tower, which was designed by noted local architect Ralph Kelman. Construction should be under way by the first quarter, and the entire project is set to be finished in April 2006.

"We have waited a long time for the development of this property, and this is the perfect opportunity," said Dallas City Council member Veletta Forsythe Lill. "This area is poised for great things, and I know the neighbors will be pleased to see this happening." Behringer Harvard Funds, which underwrites national real-estate investment funds, also recently bought several Dallas-area office buildings.

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com

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  #207  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 10:25 PM
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Uptown activity sizzles
Gables to build apartments, retail space near the West Village
11:05 PM CST on Wednesday, November 3, 2004
By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News


Construction workers may soon outnumber shoppers on McKinney Avenue.

The Uptown strip is booming, with new shops, restaurants and rental homes. Now, apartment developer Gables Residential Trust is starting two buildings across the street from the West Village. The biggest is a retail and apartment building on Cityplace Boulevard at McKinney, next door to the shopping strip that houses Borders Books and Chase Bank. It will be 104 apartments on top of about 28,000 square feet of retail, said Doug Chesnut, senior vice president of Gables Residential Trust.

"It will be a little more contemporary-looking than West Village but should be a nice fit with the neighborhood," he said. Good Fulton & Farrell Architects designed the building, which is being built in a partnership with Cityplace Co. The adjoining retail building and parking garage were also built by Cityplace. "I think construction will probably kick off at the start of the year," said Cityplace president Neal Sleeper. "We're working on the retail tenants right now." Gables is also building the next phase of apartments for the West Village complex. West Village developers Henry S. Miller III and Robert Bagwell picked Gables to build 75 apartments on top of about 19,000 square feet of retail space. Construction is under way on the north side of Blackburn between McKinney and Cole.

Mr. Chesnut said the apartments in both buildings should rent for about $1.35 to $1.45 per square foot. West Village opened in 2003 with 150,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space and 175 apartments.

The shopping center has the Magnolia art-movie theater and such stores as Tommy Bahamas, the Gap and Ann Taylor.

These would be the remainder of block 7C(right side on the rendering) and the smaller buildings across Blackburn from the labelled West Village, though it sounds as if it will be bigger than it sounds.

Last edited by Owlhorn; Nov 18, 2004 at 10:30 PM.
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  #208  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 10:25 PM
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Uptown activity sizzles
Gables to build apartments, retail space near the West Village
11:05 PM CST on Wednesday, November 3, 2004
By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News


Construction workers may soon outnumber shoppers on McKinney Avenue.

The Uptown strip is booming, with new shops, restaurants and rental homes. Now, apartment developer Gables Residential Trust is starting two buildings across the street from the West Village. The biggest is a retail and apartment building on Cityplace Boulevard at McKinney, next door to the shopping strip that houses Borders Books and Chase Bank. It will be 104 apartments on top of about 28,000 square feet of retail, said Doug Chesnut, senior vice president of Gables Residential Trust.

"It will be a little more contemporary-looking than West Village but should be a nice fit with the neighborhood," he said. Good Fulton & Farrell Architects designed the building, which is being built in a partnership with Cityplace Co. The adjoining retail building and parking garage were also built by Cityplace. "I think construction will probably kick off at the start of the year," said Cityplace president Neal Sleeper. "We're working on the retail tenants right now." Gables is also building the next phase of apartments for the West Village complex. West Village developers Henry S. Miller III and Robert Bagwell picked Gables to build 75 apartments on top of about 19,000 square feet of retail space. Construction is under way on the north side of Blackburn between McKinney and Cole.

Mr. Chesnut said the apartments in both buildings should rent for about $1.35 to $1.45 per square foot. West Village opened in 2003 with 150,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space and 175 apartments.

The shopping center has the Magnolia art-movie theater and such stores as Tommy Bahamas, the Gap and Ann Taylor.

These would be the remainder of block 7C(right side on the rendering) and the smaller buildings across Blackburn from the labelled West Village, though it sounds as if it will be bigger than it sounds.
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  #209  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 10:39 PM
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Lake Highlands is an area in NE Dallas


Makeover envisioned at Lake Highlands site
Developer hopes to raze apartments and build retail-residential center
11:15 AM CDT on Friday, October 15, 2004
By WENDY HUNDLEY and STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News

Three aging apartment complexes in Lake Highlands may be demolished to make room for a commercial and residential complex. Sutter Wood, Ashton Springs and Ashton Point along Skillman south of Kingsley are under contract to be purchased by Fort Worth-based developer Trademark Cos., said Dallas City Council member Bill Blaydes. "They form the core of Lake Highlands Town Center," said Mr. Blaydes, referring to the working name for the 59-acre project.

Mr. Blaydes said the proposed urban center would also include a city park and a light rail station on DART's Blue Line that connects Lake Highlands to Garland and downtown Dallas. "It will change Lake Highlands forever," he said. "Creating a new town center is something that will cause leapfrog development up Skillman." Terry Montesi, Trademark Cos.' president, wouldn't discuss the planned redevelopment, citing confidentiality agreements related to the property purchase. But leasing agents looking for retail tenants said the deal is moving forward.

"This will be a pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use development," said Mickey Ashmore, president of United Commercial Realty. "You will be able to ride DART, go to the store and go home. We want to make it truly a little village." He said between 60,000 and 130,000 square feet of shop space will be constructed, and potential tenants include a specialty food store, restaurants, apparel and service retailers. Other retail real estate brokers say the Lake Highlands area needs retail. "I think it will be great infill development and is much needed," said Jill Tiernan of the Retail Connection. "It can be the Inwood Village for Lake Highlands."

Mr. Blaydes, who represents the surrounding council district, plans to hold a town hall meeting in November to discuss the project, which has been in the works for several months. He said construction could start in early 2006. Townhouses, homes and some office space are being considered for the Northeast Dallas development. Mr. Blaydes said the lofts, townhouses and zero-lot-line homes would range in price from $180,000 to $600,000. The redevelopment, which would replace about 1,000 apartment units built in the 1970s, "is our first shot at a real urban rehabilitation," he said. A DART station in that vicinity was first proposed in 1996, said Mike Miles, DART's senior manager of community and member city relations.

He said DART has been working with the city and Trademark Cos. for several months, but officials have not identified funding for the station. "There's a lot of work to be done," Mr. Miles said. "But, from our standpoint, it makes sense that we're starting to see more transit-oriented development in the city." Mr. Blaydes said the development would be privately owned, but city officials may create a tax-increment financing district, or TIF, to help pay for streets, utilities and other infrastructure improvements. The proposed project would also require a zoning change.

New Urbanism to Create Town Center

Development Would Change the Face of Lake Highlands

Thursday, September 2, 2004
By GREG FORD/ Lake Highlands People


Big changes are on the way in Lake Highlands, including a possible Mockingbird Station type development.

The proposed alterations to the area landscape are along Skillman Street near White Rock Lake Trail and Kingsley Road. The numerous changes include tearing down several apartment complexes and replacing them with a development that will feature office, retail, and residential units.

Plans also include a DART light-rail station near White Rock Trail.

The Fort Worth-based company is negotiating to purchase the properties.

“It will change the face of Lake Highlands,” said City Councilman Bill Blaydes. “It will give them the town center they’ve been looking for for 20 years.”

Trademark officials declined to discuss the matter, as they are still in negotiations to buy the properties.

During an Aug. 24 town hall meeting at Lake Highlands high School, Mr. Blaydes said one property owner is holding out.
“We are working diligently to make this project work," he told the audience. “I still believe this is the best thing for the community.”

The proposed development would be paid for through a combination of public and private money, and both the community and city government would benefit, Mr. Blaydes said.

“We are no longer a suburban area, he said.

The new complex would be in the same area as the Kingsley Square shopping center, which is being reinvested by new owner Ray Washburne, a supporter of trademark’s pursuits.

“The complexes across the street are very tired, and it would breed a lot of new life (into the area)," he said.

The DART station would sit along the line that now runs from Mockingbird to Garland. It would be east of the rail line, and just off the White Rock Trail.

“I think the community is looking forward to development for higher and better uses,” said Michael Miles, a spokesman for DART.

DART Station, Trail in the Mix at Trademark
Projects could mean more development, easier access to White Rock Lake

November 5, 2004

By Greg Ford/ Lake Highlands People

The Trademark Property Company is not the only one with big plans for land near the intersection of Kingsley along Skillman.

The city of Dallas, in con junction with the proposed Trademark project, expects to spend around $14 million building a Dallas Area Rapid Transit station, as well as constructing a walking and biking trail, which will connect to the existing White Rock Trail and run through a good portion of the community.

‘We think it could mean a lot, because once you put the infrastructure in place (you can build around it),” said Michael Miles, a spokesman for DART.

A public hearing regarding the proposed Trademark development south of Kingsley along Skillman is scheduled for Nov. 11 at the Lake Highlands Freshman Center.

Neither company officials nor City Councilman Bill Blaydes will discuss specifics about the project. Reports have indicated that it could be a mixed-use development similar to Mockingbird Station, which would include retail, office, and residential space.

The proposed DART station could play a major role in bringing people to and from the development.

“It’s always nice in a dense environment to have mass transit in the mix,” Mr. Blaydes said.

The DART station, planned for the eastern boundary of the proposed development, would be on the Blue Line between the stations at White Rock and Skillman and LBJ Freeway.

A station planned for that location in the 1990s did not come to fruition, Mr. Miles said.

A station there now could potentially lead to more development. In Piano, there are two residential complexes are being constructed around the DART station in the downtown area, said DART spokesman Morgan Lyons.

Money for both the DART station and the proposed trail is expected to come from a $14 million grant from the North Central Texas Council of Governments, said Willis Winters, assistant director for planning, design, and construction for the Dallas Parks and Recreation Department.

About $2 million of that will be spent on the proposed trail, which is expected to be about a mile-and-a-half long, Mr. Winters said. The proposed trail Will start at the southeast corner of Kingsley and Skillman, and then run east along the south side of Kingsley until it gets to the creek in the area. It will then follow the creek south along the perimeter of the proposed Trademark development, and then hook up with the White Rock and Greenbelt trails, Mr. Winters said.

Eventually, the plan is to run the trail north of Kingsley, where it will connect with a proposed Lake Highlands trail that will run east from the Lake Highlands Freshman Center east to the LBJ Freeway.

“It means that Lake Highlands (residents) can get on the trail, instead of driving to Lawther and Northwest Highway,” Mr. Blaydes said.

sorry about the quality
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  #210  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 10:39 PM
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Lake Highlands is an area in NE Dallas


Makeover envisioned at Lake Highlands site
Developer hopes to raze apartments and build retail-residential center
11:15 AM CDT on Friday, October 15, 2004
By WENDY HUNDLEY and STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News

Three aging apartment complexes in Lake Highlands may be demolished to make room for a commercial and residential complex. Sutter Wood, Ashton Springs and Ashton Point along Skillman south of Kingsley are under contract to be purchased by Fort Worth-based developer Trademark Cos., said Dallas City Council member Bill Blaydes. "They form the core of Lake Highlands Town Center," said Mr. Blaydes, referring to the working name for the 59-acre project.

Mr. Blaydes said the proposed urban center would also include a city park and a light rail station on DART's Blue Line that connects Lake Highlands to Garland and downtown Dallas. "It will change Lake Highlands forever," he said. "Creating a new town center is something that will cause leapfrog development up Skillman." Terry Montesi, Trademark Cos.' president, wouldn't discuss the planned redevelopment, citing confidentiality agreements related to the property purchase. But leasing agents looking for retail tenants said the deal is moving forward.

"This will be a pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use development," said Mickey Ashmore, president of United Commercial Realty. "You will be able to ride DART, go to the store and go home. We want to make it truly a little village." He said between 60,000 and 130,000 square feet of shop space will be constructed, and potential tenants include a specialty food store, restaurants, apparel and service retailers. Other retail real estate brokers say the Lake Highlands area needs retail. "I think it will be great infill development and is much needed," said Jill Tiernan of the Retail Connection. "It can be the Inwood Village for Lake Highlands."

Mr. Blaydes, who represents the surrounding council district, plans to hold a town hall meeting in November to discuss the project, which has been in the works for several months. He said construction could start in early 2006. Townhouses, homes and some office space are being considered for the Northeast Dallas development. Mr. Blaydes said the lofts, townhouses and zero-lot-line homes would range in price from $180,000 to $600,000. The redevelopment, which would replace about 1,000 apartment units built in the 1970s, "is our first shot at a real urban rehabilitation," he said. A DART station in that vicinity was first proposed in 1996, said Mike Miles, DART's senior manager of community and member city relations.

He said DART has been working with the city and Trademark Cos. for several months, but officials have not identified funding for the station. "There's a lot of work to be done," Mr. Miles said. "But, from our standpoint, it makes sense that we're starting to see more transit-oriented development in the city." Mr. Blaydes said the development would be privately owned, but city officials may create a tax-increment financing district, or TIF, to help pay for streets, utilities and other infrastructure improvements. The proposed project would also require a zoning change.

New Urbanism to Create Town Center

Development Would Change the Face of Lake Highlands

Thursday, September 2, 2004
By GREG FORD/ Lake Highlands People


Big changes are on the way in Lake Highlands, including a possible Mockingbird Station type development.

The proposed alterations to the area landscape are along Skillman Street near White Rock Lake Trail and Kingsley Road. The numerous changes include tearing down several apartment complexes and replacing them with a development that will feature office, retail, and residential units.

Plans also include a DART light-rail station near White Rock Trail.

The Fort Worth-based company is negotiating to purchase the properties.

“It will change the face of Lake Highlands,” said City Councilman Bill Blaydes. “It will give them the town center they’ve been looking for for 20 years.”

Trademark officials declined to discuss the matter, as they are still in negotiations to buy the properties.

During an Aug. 24 town hall meeting at Lake Highlands high School, Mr. Blaydes said one property owner is holding out.
“We are working diligently to make this project work," he told the audience. “I still believe this is the best thing for the community.”

The proposed development would be paid for through a combination of public and private money, and both the community and city government would benefit, Mr. Blaydes said.

“We are no longer a suburban area, he said.

The new complex would be in the same area as the Kingsley Square shopping center, which is being reinvested by new owner Ray Washburne, a supporter of trademark’s pursuits.

“The complexes across the street are very tired, and it would breed a lot of new life (into the area)," he said.

The DART station would sit along the line that now runs from Mockingbird to Garland. It would be east of the rail line, and just off the White Rock Trail.

“I think the community is looking forward to development for higher and better uses,” said Michael Miles, a spokesman for DART.

DART Station, Trail in the Mix at Trademark
Projects could mean more development, easier access to White Rock Lake

November 5, 2004

By Greg Ford/ Lake Highlands People

The Trademark Property Company is not the only one with big plans for land near the intersection of Kingsley along Skillman.

The city of Dallas, in con junction with the proposed Trademark project, expects to spend around $14 million building a Dallas Area Rapid Transit station, as well as constructing a walking and biking trail, which will connect to the existing White Rock Trail and run through a good portion of the community.

‘We think it could mean a lot, because once you put the infrastructure in place (you can build around it),” said Michael Miles, a spokesman for DART.

A public hearing regarding the proposed Trademark development south of Kingsley along Skillman is scheduled for Nov. 11 at the Lake Highlands Freshman Center.

Neither company officials nor City Councilman Bill Blaydes will discuss specifics about the project. Reports have indicated that it could be a mixed-use development similar to Mockingbird Station, which would include retail, office, and residential space.

The proposed DART station could play a major role in bringing people to and from the development.

“It’s always nice in a dense environment to have mass transit in the mix,” Mr. Blaydes said.

The DART station, planned for the eastern boundary of the proposed development, would be on the Blue Line between the stations at White Rock and Skillman and LBJ Freeway.

A station planned for that location in the 1990s did not come to fruition, Mr. Miles said.

A station there now could potentially lead to more development. In Piano, there are two residential complexes are being constructed around the DART station in the downtown area, said DART spokesman Morgan Lyons.

Money for both the DART station and the proposed trail is expected to come from a $14 million grant from the North Central Texas Council of Governments, said Willis Winters, assistant director for planning, design, and construction for the Dallas Parks and Recreation Department.

About $2 million of that will be spent on the proposed trail, which is expected to be about a mile-and-a-half long, Mr. Winters said. The proposed trail Will start at the southeast corner of Kingsley and Skillman, and then run east along the south side of Kingsley until it gets to the creek in the area. It will then follow the creek south along the perimeter of the proposed Trademark development, and then hook up with the White Rock and Greenbelt trails, Mr. Winters said.

Eventually, the plan is to run the trail north of Kingsley, where it will connect with a proposed Lake Highlands trail that will run east from the Lake Highlands Freshman Center east to the LBJ Freeway.

“It means that Lake Highlands (residents) can get on the trail, instead of driving to Lawther and Northwest Highway,” Mr. Blaydes said.

sorry about the quality
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  #211  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 10:41 PM
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Azure finally releases renderings


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  #212  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2004, 10:41 PM
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  #213  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2004, 5:00 PM
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Staying power
Surrounded by successful redos, a downtown skyscraper will be getting new life as a grand hotel
08:02 PM CST on Thursday, December 23, 2004
By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...otel.41d96.html

Love has something to do with Robert Colombo's latest venture. Why else would he tackle the daunting prospect of turning a boarded-up 78-year-old office building into a posh hotel? It's taken almost two years of preparation, but Mr. Colombo's deLuxe Hotel Group is about to begin restoring an empty office tower at 1530 Main St. into the Joule Urban Resort. "I first saw the building in 1997 or 1998, and it reminded me of a New York residential hotel," said Mr. Colombo, who spent most of his career in the hotel and restaurant business. "Maybe that's why I fell in love with it."

Location is also key. Sitting midway between Neiman Marcus and the Magnolia Building, the project is surrounded by successful redevelopments. It faces the popular Stone Street Gardens mall, with its eclectic collection of restaurants, and the Kirby Building and Wilson Building apartment communities are a few doors down. "We have an opportunity here to do something unique – an important project for the city," said Mr. Colombo, who's embarking on the project with investor Tim Headington of Headington Resources. "It will be something Dallas has not really seen before."

Modern

Looking at the gothic-inspired office tower, it's hard to believe the building was advertised as being "modern" when it debuted in the 1920s. The 17-story building was built as the headquarters for the Dallas National Bank. In later years, it housed a department store and a retail arcade. With its small floors and long, thin profile, the building was inefficient for modern office space. But that kind of layout is perfect for hotel rooms. Dallas-based ArchiTexas – an experienced renovation architect – will oversee this effort to save a piece of Main Street history.

The intricate stone exterior of the building will be restored to mint condition, but as soon as you step through the front door, you'll leave the 1920s behind. Award-winning New York designer Adam Tihany will create an ultra-contemporary theme for the lobby, rooms, restaurant, lounge and other spaces. "It will be a great juxtaposition of old vs. new," Mr. Colombo said. "There is a grand old facade and a new, contemporary interior." Mr. Tihany, whose Aleph Hotel in Rome won European design awards, is better known in the United States for his work on top nightclubs and restaurants, including Per Se in New York. "We've asked Adam to do something at the very highest end of contemporary design," Mr. Colombo said.

'Bonanza'

The hotel will have 124 rooms and suites, and developers are building an adjoining 10-story wing on the tower to house a restaurant, meeting rooms, additional guest rooms and a spa with a rooftop pool. The project will cost more than $25 million. "We've already finished all the interior demolition," said Mr. Colombo, who hopes to open the hotel in early 2006. "It couldn't happen fast enough for me," said Tom Taylor, who has renovated several restaurant and retail buildings in the same block. "It's going to be a spectacular improvement to have a five-star restaurant and a boutique hotel. "That's a bonanza for downtown." Merrill Lynch Capital is providing funding. The project is getting a boost from the Center City Tax Increment Finance board, which agreed to provide several million dollars in redevelopment incentives. "It's going to be fabulous and will have a huge impact and add activity on Main Street," said Alice Murray, president of the Central Dallas Association.

Something different

Mr. Colombo predicts his niche hotel will be popular with visitors and locals who want something different. "We will create a reason for people to come downtown on the weekend," he said. In the 1980s, Mr. Colombo was known as one of the founders of the Sfuzzi restaurant chain, which got its start on McKinney Avenue. He's also worked in management at several New York hotels, including the Plaza, Grand Hyatt and Bryant Park. "We think this project will be unique in that it will add something to the fabric of the city," Mr. Colombo said. "And to not do anything with that building would be an absolute shame."

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com
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  #214  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2004, 5:00 PM
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Staying power
Surrounded by successful redos, a downtown skyscraper will be getting new life as a grand hotel
08:02 PM CST on Thursday, December 23, 2004
By STEVE BROWN / The Dallas Morning News
http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcon...otel.41d96.html

Love has something to do with Robert Colombo's latest venture. Why else would he tackle the daunting prospect of turning a boarded-up 78-year-old office building into a posh hotel? It's taken almost two years of preparation, but Mr. Colombo's deLuxe Hotel Group is about to begin restoring an empty office tower at 1530 Main St. into the Joule Urban Resort. "I first saw the building in 1997 or 1998, and it reminded me of a New York residential hotel," said Mr. Colombo, who spent most of his career in the hotel and restaurant business. "Maybe that's why I fell in love with it."

Location is also key. Sitting midway between Neiman Marcus and the Magnolia Building, the project is surrounded by successful redevelopments. It faces the popular Stone Street Gardens mall, with its eclectic collection of restaurants, and the Kirby Building and Wilson Building apartment communities are a few doors down. "We have an opportunity here to do something unique – an important project for the city," said Mr. Colombo, who's embarking on the project with investor Tim Headington of Headington Resources. "It will be something Dallas has not really seen before."

Modern

Looking at the gothic-inspired office tower, it's hard to believe the building was advertised as being "modern" when it debuted in the 1920s. The 17-story building was built as the headquarters for the Dallas National Bank. In later years, it housed a department store and a retail arcade. With its small floors and long, thin profile, the building was inefficient for modern office space. But that kind of layout is perfect for hotel rooms. Dallas-based ArchiTexas – an experienced renovation architect – will oversee this effort to save a piece of Main Street history.

The intricate stone exterior of the building will be restored to mint condition, but as soon as you step through the front door, you'll leave the 1920s behind. Award-winning New York designer Adam Tihany will create an ultra-contemporary theme for the lobby, rooms, restaurant, lounge and other spaces. "It will be a great juxtaposition of old vs. new," Mr. Colombo said. "There is a grand old facade and a new, contemporary interior." Mr. Tihany, whose Aleph Hotel in Rome won European design awards, is better known in the United States for his work on top nightclubs and restaurants, including Per Se in New York. "We've asked Adam to do something at the very highest end of contemporary design," Mr. Colombo said.

'Bonanza'

The hotel will have 124 rooms and suites, and developers are building an adjoining 10-story wing on the tower to house a restaurant, meeting rooms, additional guest rooms and a spa with a rooftop pool. The project will cost more than $25 million. "We've already finished all the interior demolition," said Mr. Colombo, who hopes to open the hotel in early 2006. "It couldn't happen fast enough for me," said Tom Taylor, who has renovated several restaurant and retail buildings in the same block. "It's going to be a spectacular improvement to have a five-star restaurant and a boutique hotel. "That's a bonanza for downtown." Merrill Lynch Capital is providing funding. The project is getting a boost from the Center City Tax Increment Finance board, which agreed to provide several million dollars in redevelopment incentives. "It's going to be fabulous and will have a huge impact and add activity on Main Street," said Alice Murray, president of the Central Dallas Association.

Something different

Mr. Colombo predicts his niche hotel will be popular with visitors and locals who want something different. "We will create a reason for people to come downtown on the weekend," he said. In the 1980s, Mr. Colombo was known as one of the founders of the Sfuzzi restaurant chain, which got its start on McKinney Avenue. He's also worked in management at several New York hotels, including the Plaza, Grand Hyatt and Bryant Park. "We think this project will be unique in that it will add something to the fabric of the city," Mr. Colombo said. "And to not do anything with that building would be an absolute shame."

E-mail stevebrown@dallasnews.com
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  #215  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2004, 5:23 PM
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Gables Uptown Dallas update



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  #216  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2004, 5:23 PM
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Gables Uptown Dallas update



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  #217  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2004, 5:38 PM
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Mondrian approaching finishout on the exterior. Will be the 4th completed project in the huge West Village/Cityplace plan. Labeled ZOM on the right:



to update, 7D, half of 7C(other half announced and staked off), and West Village are finished. The Mondrian is close and the block west of the Mondrian (unlabeled on the rendering) is now under construction as a residential/ground floor retail building. According to some inside, several others are already in the design stage and are 20+ stories.



Facing east across McKinney


The view south from the 16th floor


Looking north at the very un-Dallas tower
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  #218  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2004, 5:38 PM
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Mondrian approaching finishout on the exterior. Will be the 4th completed project in the huge West Village/Cityplace plan. Labeled ZOM on the right:



to update, 7D, half of 7C(other half announced and staked off), and West Village are finished. The Mondrian is close and the block west of the Mondrian (unlabeled on the rendering) is now under construction as a residential/ground floor retail building. According to some inside, several others are already in the design stage and are 20+ stories.



Facing east across McKinney


The view south from the 16th floor


Looking north at the very un-Dallas tower
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  #219  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2004, 11:13 PM
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The latest mixed-use TOD project in Dallas. Park Lane Place. This sits at a crossroads between Preston Hollow and the Park Cities to the west, and the poor Vickery Meadows to the East. The entire area has been rezoned for dense housing and high rises, so you should see more around this. This is about 5 miles north of downtown at DART's Park Lane station. Across Central Expressway is North Park Mall(Dallas' most upscale) which is now going through a major renovation that will double its size. Park Lane Place is like an LA style lifestyle center on steroids. Like a larger version of Mockingbird Station. The garages are already u/c. You can see the glass office buildings with the red roofs. They already exist and are being renovated currently. This project has been known and the cranes there for a while.



Actually construction pic from the Park Lake elevated LRT station





I'm sure this doesn't impress those in much more dense cities or even inner city Dallas neighborhoods, but its pretty cool for being surrounded by office park towers, normal big box and a large shopping mall. Its not a Victory, West Village or even Bryan Place, but it is TOD and is a great start for such a suburban part of Dallas.

Last edited by Owlhorn; Dec 28, 2004 at 12:38 AM.
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  #220  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2004, 11:13 PM
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The latest mixed-use TOD project in Dallas. Park Lane Place. This sits at a crossroads between Preston Hollow and the Park Cities to the west, and the poor Vickery Meadows to the East. The entire area has been rezoned for dense housing and high rises, so you should see more around this. This is about 5 miles north of downtown at DART's Park Lane station. Across Central Expressway is North Park Mall(Dallas' most upscale) which is now going through a major renovation that will double its size. Park Lane Place is like an LA style lifestyle center on steroids. Like a larger version of Mockingbird Station. The garages are already u/c. You can see the glass office buildings with the red roofs. They already exist and are being renovated currently. This project has been known and the cranes there for a while.



Actually construction pic from the Park Lake elevated LRT station





I'm sure this doesn't impress those in much more dense cities or even inner city Dallas neighborhoods, but its pretty cool for being surrounded by office park towers, normal big box and a large shopping mall. Its not a Victory, West Village or even Bryan Place, but it is TOD and is a great start for such a suburban part of Dallas.
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