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  #1  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2006, 5:03 PM
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Arriviste Arriviste is offline
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Lovers of Modernism, I need your help!

I am about to start writing my final paper for one of my architecture history classes and have quite an easy topic to discuss: Trace early Modern Architecture, discuss what you consider to be its theoretical basis , and show what you believe to bethe key monuments best exemplifying Modernism. Conclude with a short discussion of the principal short-comings of early Modernism and assess the arguments of it's most vocal critics.

I was planning on starting in the Art Noveau with Mackintosh's Glasgow School of art, move through works such as the fagus shoe factory, etc etc etc.
When I get home from work, I will post the rest of the buildings I consider noteworthy. What do you guys think?

I know how much knowledge some of you have on the subject (Steely), thats what seperates SSP.
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  #2  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 6:13 AM
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man, that is a broad topic....are you looking at modern architeture in general or modernism specifically (international style)?

i think you need to reduce it to a specific line of thinking....focus on a specific development or something.

the lineage of modern architecture in the states, starts with the chicago exposition and the reaction to it...of course mrs. o'leareys cow is the real kick off.....follow, adler and sullivan (carson pirie scott and the auditorium), burnam and root (monadnock and reliance)...all the way through wright and the prairie style (roby house, fallingwater, johnson wax, guggenheim), to art deco in the 30's (saarinen's chicago tribune tower entry) to mies (seagram's building) of course, louis kahn (kimbel and salk) .....the list is endless and this is only half the story.

europe had its own path through modern architecture, it really starts with the industrial revolution and the crystal palace....along with art noveau (casa mila) you may have to reference the arts and crafts movement (morris and mckintosh), corbu of course (villa sayoie and ronchamps), expressionism (eintein tower), constructivism (tatlin's tower) destijl (schroeder house), bauhaus with gropius and breuer (AEG turbine)...it goes on and on....

my point is that i really think that to write a good paper, you should focus only on a single stream...the topic is way too broad and could easily fill an encyclopedia....maybe start at o'leary's cow and trace only the development in chicago...you could reference the significant buildings and events in the rest of the states and in europe along the timeline, but frame it in a way that it shows their influences on chicago architecture as it developed...describe the effects that outside architects like mies had as they began to practice in the city itself, influencing the chicago lineage of modernism that had been nurtured by wright, sullivan and others.....skyscraper design in new york overshadowed and influenced what happened in chicago later on....today it stands as the second city...you could discuss how living in the shadow of new york influences the design of its current modernist buildings as it tries to re-establish its national prominence (sears tower and the new calatrava proposal are examples of this)....today it looks to the world for its modernist architecture....it could be a wonderful topic.

anyways, thats my 2 cents.

Last edited by trueviking; Dec 11, 2006 at 6:48 AM.
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Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 6:19 AM
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Try doing the European branch instead, it isn't as well known in North America, so it would be interesting to learn more about and would be a bit of a fun challenge.

I'm not an expert on Modernism but I do love it. Will you be sharing your final draft with us?
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Old Posted Dec 11, 2006, 6:47 AM
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a web site with some reference buildings...

http://www.greatbuildings.com/types.html
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  #5  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 2:58 AM
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Most excellent. It is such a broad topic, I realize. and I have to get it down to 8 pages. Oh god.
That is a great reference page.
My girldfriend gave me a great book last night called "the architecture of hapiness" and it has some relevant insight into the issue.
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Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 3:35 AM
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Perhaps consider the early modern movement in late 19th century Chicago vs the the revilvalist Columbian Exposition and its effects on the direction of modern archtitecture. If that discussion fits your subject matter.
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  #7  
Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 6:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arriviste View Post
I am about to start writing my final paper for one of my architecture history classes and have quite an easy topic to discuss: Trace early Modern Architecture, discuss what you consider to be its theoretical basis , and show what you believe to bethe key monuments best exemplifying Modernism. Conclude with a short discussion of the principal short-comings of early Modernism and assess the arguments of it's most vocal critics.

I was planning on starting in the Art Noveau with Mackintosh's Glasgow School of art, move through works such as the fagus shoe factory, etc etc etc.
When I get home from work, I will post the rest of the buildings I consider noteworthy. What do you guys think?

I know how much knowledge some of you have on the subject (Steely), thats what seperates SSP.
You also should look into early versons of the so called "slab" modern architecture. These are office buildings that were the first ones to be a 3D slab without ornamitation or setback. The UN Secretariat building from 1950 is probably the very first example of this. The 2nd would probably be the US Steel-Mellon building in Pittsburgh from 1951. Back issues of the magazine Architecture Forum have great articles on both of these early modern slabs. Most large university libraries have bound copies of Architecture Forum magazine. I forget the exact issue, but the artclies are from 1950 or 1951.

Last edited by zeno333; Dec 12, 2006 at 7:00 AM. Reason: typo
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Old Posted Dec 12, 2006, 9:54 AM
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About the European modernism the last architect was Josep Maria Jujol 1879-1949. He was a Gaudi's colaborator who developed his own style until his death.
IMO,It is possible to make a certain connection with the Gehry´s early work.
An architect unknown except by architecture experts.
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Last edited by anecdoto; Mar 23, 2016 at 7:43 AM.
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  #9  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2006, 1:24 AM
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Heres a short list of my selected buildings and projects:

1.Karl Schinkel's Altes Museum, 1828, Berlin.

2. Joseph Paxton, Crystal Palace, 1851, London

3.Clause Ledoux's proposal for a house over the river Loue, 1804

4.PAris Opera House, Charles Garnier, 1861

5. Lou Sullivans Auditorium Bldg 1889

5.Victor Horta's Tassel Hotel, 1893, Brussels

6.Gaudi's CAsa Mila, Barcelona, 1910

7.MAckintosh's Glasgow School of Art, 1909

8.Wagners Post office savings bank, Vienna, 1906

9. Perrett's gorgous apartments at 25bis rue Franklin, PAris, 1903

10. Corbus' dom-ino skeleton 1910

11.Webb's Red House, 1859, Bruxeley

12.Behrens Aeg turbine factory, Berlin, 1909

13. Gropius's Fagus Shoe Factory, Alfeld 1912

etc etc etc.
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  #10  
Old Posted Dec 13, 2006, 3:21 AM
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Reliance Building, 1891 Chicago, Burnham & Root - perhaps the true beginning of the modern movement, in skyscrapers at least!
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