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  #21  
Old Posted Dec 17, 2006, 5:35 PM
Jeff_in_Dayton Jeff_in_Dayton is offline
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Bungaloz?

I'm impressed with the Australian examples, which are very very close to US style bungalows...you could mis-identify some of these as being from a US city very easily.
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  #22  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2006, 10:07 AM
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kalmia kalmia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beesbees View Post
Ah I see... I've always thought of a bungalow as only having one floor. As soon as it has more then it becomes a house. Of course, if it's a loft conversion it becomes a gray area.

Here's what ive always seen as a "typical" bungalow, anyway:

The houses in England that I have seen called 'bungalows' are closer to what would be called a 'ranch' house in the US.

Around Chicago they are typically raised several feet above the grade and sit on a basement. Attic windows are common on many of them, even if the attic isn't high enough to use as living space. The windows add light to see around in the attic and give the exterior elevations more visual interest.
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  #23  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2006, 1:33 PM
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Love them. Would love to live in one.
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  #24  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2006, 6:38 PM
edluva edluva is offline
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The California Bungalow was most popular between 1900 and 1920. The first California house dubbed "bungalow" was built by San Francisco architect A. Page Brown in the 1890s.

California Bungalow Predecessors:

Gamble House: Pasadena, CA 1908







Spinks House: Pasadena, CA 1909




LA Area Bungalows:


Craftsman Bungalow: Los Angeles, CA 1917




Bungalow Heaven Landmark District: Pasadena, CA







Jefferson Park bungalow: Los Angeles, CA




Schnitget House: Garden Grove, CA




Anaheim Historic Colony District: Anaheim, CA 1920s (notice driveways)

























Spanish Colonial Bungalow, Anaheim Historic Colony Dist





Long Beach Bungalows:







Venice Bungalow:

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  #25  
Old Posted Dec 25, 2006, 12:44 AM
John R John R is offline
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Fort Worth is also full of them. One neighborhood, called Fairmount, is supposedly the largest (in area) National Register Historic District containing them in the U.S.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2007, 12:36 PM
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Atomic Glee Atomic Glee is offline
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Originally Posted by John R View Post
Fort Worth is also full of them. One neighborhood, called Fairmount, is supposedly the largest (in area) National Register Historic District containing them in the U.S.
Great thread! I really love a classic bungalow.

John is right - the Fairmount neighborhood in Fort Worth South, the district immediately south of downtown, is chock-full of classic bungalows from the teens and '20s. Formerly a poster-child of urban ruin thanks to suburban flight, Fairmount and the rest of Fort Worth South are really being reborn into a funky, cool urban village, and tons of the old bungalows have already been restored. It's a really cool neighborhood, especially for bungalow fans.
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2007, 7:03 PM
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Atomic Glee Atomic Glee is offline
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Just so happens I was in Fairmount today, so I thought I'd grab a few photos of the Fairmount neighborhood, the largest historic neighborhood in the southwestern United States. Fairmount, with more than one thousand contributing structures, is comprised of mostly bungalow and four square homes from the late 1800s through the early 1920s.







See more in this photo thread:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...39#post2579239
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Last edited by Atomic Glee; Jan 21, 2007 at 7:11 PM.
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 22, 2007, 5:53 PM
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MolsonExport MolsonExport is offline
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Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?
Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?

He went out tiger hunting with his elephant and gun
In case of accidents he always took his mom
He's the all American bullet-headed Saxon mother's son
All the children sing

Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?
Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?

Deep in the jungle where the mighty tiger lies
Bill and his elephants were taken by surprise
So Captain Marvel zapped in right between the eyes, zap!
All the children sing

Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?
Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?

The children asked him if to kill was not a sin
"Not when he looked so fierce", his mummy butted in
If looks could kill it would have been us instead of him
All the children sing

Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?
Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?

Oh ho!

Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?
Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?

Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?
Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?

Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?
Hey, Bungalow Bill
What did you kill, Bungalow Bill?

[Eh up!]
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