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  #9141  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 10:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMK View Post
I don't think this has been posted yet, this is what's going up 380 s 400 e "Block 44"

http://www.liveatblock44.com/
That looks very nice, except for the fact that it appears to be almost a block long. I thought they were only tearing down the Scientology building. That rendering makes it look like they're taking out the entire frontage up to the 7-11.
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  #9142  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 11:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stenar View Post
That looks very nice, except for the fact that it appears to be almost a block long. I thought they were only tearing down the Scientology building. That rendering makes it look like they're taking out the entire frontage up to the 7-11.
I believe it's the two additional buildings before Presto print as well.

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  #9143  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 11:35 PM
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Oh that is gross, 405' long. That's only 15' narrower than Wells Fargo is tall. UNACCEPTABLE
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  #9144  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 12:57 AM
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I like the depth of the set backs. That will help a lot with the length, if indeed it were that long. When someone figures it out for sure, let us know.
I also like the look of how it sits on the corner at 400 E. & 400 S. Not sure about the Scientology Buildings loss, but the adj. old home is in terrible condition.
Too bad it couldn't be moved and restored. In its better days it was a fairly decent home. Overall, I think it's a big improvement over the one story commercial,
parking, and general underdeveloped anemic feel of that stretch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMK View Post
I don't think this has been posted yet, this is what's going up 380 s 400 e "Block 44"

http://www.liveatblock44.com/

--


Last edited by delts145; Mar 22, 2017 at 1:28 AM.
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  #9145  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 8:02 AM
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I like it as well but I think it would look perfect if it was four floors higher though.
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  #9146  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 8:47 AM
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A sixth, possible seventh site added for new homeless shelter - both in South Salt Lake

http://www.ksl.com/?sid=43584370&nid...outh-salt-lake

...The move didn't sit well with South Salt Lake's mayor, who learned of the new sites at a meeting with McAdams on Monday.

"We were shocked," Mayor Cherie Wood said. "We came to have a conversation about two sites and we walked out of that meeting knowing we had four." ...


.
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  #9147  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 10:20 AM
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Would like to see something like this on 400 South. Hey, State or Main, anywhere downtown would be great. Even a little taller, if in the CBD area of Main, W. Temple or State.


http://images.adsttc.com
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  #9148  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 12:49 PM
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Sadly, stuff like that is too bold for Salt Lake - at least on that scale.
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  #9149  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 3:24 PM
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I agree, I too would like to see something like that. I think that would be great on 400 S and North Temple as well as other places in East downtown. Further south on Main or State, below 9th would also work, particularly in the area between 13th and 17th. I think that type of development would also work great at main line Trax stations, there is one little corner parcel at Fireclay that I think would be ideal for something a bit taller, around 8-10 stories.
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  #9150  
Old Posted Yesterday, 1:00 AM
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I'm not sure that I agree that it's "too bold" for SLC. I think the fact is that it's too expensive for SLC. I see great designs that come out of architects that just get watered down/destroyed as the construction costs get priced out and the developers start to freak out. That's why you end up with a lot of boxes.
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  #9151  
Old Posted Yesterday, 1:05 AM
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by UTPlanner View Post
I'm not sure that I agree that it's "too bold" for SLC. I think the fact is that it's too expensive for SLC. I see great designs that come out of architects that just get watered down/destroyed as the construction costs get priced out and the developers start to freak out. That's why you end up with a lot of boxes.
Pretty much what I told my ex when explaining why we wouldnt work out
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  #9152  
Old Posted Yesterday, 1:55 AM
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Pretty much what I told my ex when explaining why we wouldnt work out
Is this because people cannot afford to live in those? Utahans have short arms and deep pockets.

Another question: Why does someone need to qualify for affordable housing? If one chooses to live a cheaper apartment, let them.
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  #9153  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UTPlanner View Post
I'm not sure that I agree that it's "too bold" for SLC. I think the fact is that it's too expensive for SLC. I see great designs that come out of architects that just get watered down/destroyed as the construction costs get priced out and the developers start to freak out. That's why you end up with a lot of boxes.
Those were my exact sentiments UTPlanner. I don't see it as "too bold" for SLC. It definitely looks upscale, and the façade pattern would also be more expensive to create. IMO though, not too expensive that there isn't a customer demand for it along the Wasatch Front. I've found that sophisticated tastes along the Wasatch Front are very alive and healthy. Of course, many of those would-be upscale apartment dwellers, prefer their nine thousand-plus sq. ft. mansion, rather than a posh dwelling amongst the downtown urbanista's. The same could be said for the well heeled here in Central Los Angeles. Per capita for per capita, Salt Lake's metro mansions are just as impressive if not more so than those here in Los Angeles. The only difference, as many have often lamented who do not choose the family lifestyle, the Wasatch Front has the excuse of numerous children to fill those large homes.

Ironweed touched on a really good point. When it comes to "short arms and deep pockets", but children are often going to be a reasonably good excuse along the Wasatch. Still, I think that there is a healthy demand for upscale apartments, and it is growing. From what I've noticed ,much of the "short arming" is coming from the local traditional financial institutions, and their currently entrenched lending policies. Experts predict that those post 2007 lending policies are going to now loosen up, and encourage more of the type of development Salt Lake City is encouraging.

If I were to take photographs of all of the many mid-rise apartment dwellings going up here in Downtown & Central Los Angeles, you would see a striking similarity in design to those in Downtown, Central Salt Lake, and Sugar House. I don't have a problem with the current American trend in apartment designs. I think most are far more handsome/attractive than their predecessors of the 50's-80's. The positive note would be that in Salt Lake's portfolio, almost all of these mid-rise apartments, even those in the more working class neighborhoods, are being finished in multiple choices of materials. In Salt Lake it has become pretty common to see three or more diverse finishes on the facades of the development. Whereas here in L.A. you will usually see the complexes finished almost entirely in stucco. The only variation in most of these mid-rises here in L.A. would be two or three different paint colors to give it a little spice. The Salt Lake trend that was demanded by people like us, of a generous application of masonry, metal, hardy board, etc. is a great positive imo. Remember when our primary complaint was beige stucco? I wish Angelino's would complain as loudly about too much stucco as those of us did in Salt Lake City. I guess though, that people here just kind of assume it's an inherent part of the Southwestern ambiance. Admittedly, stucco does kind of go along with the Phoenix/ Los Angeles vibe more than it will ever fit in for places like Salt Lake City, Denver or Boise.

Last edited by delts145; Yesterday at 10:58 AM.
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  #9154  
Old Posted Yesterday, 12:18 PM
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Joking aside.

Salt Lake housing market is very interesting. It seems like the demand is very high and inventory is very low. I often look at the listings and I am surprised to see how very little is available between $125k and $170k. Why this range? Because your mortgage (+HOA if applicable) will be at or below what some of these new residences are asking for. And these are one bedrooms. Which unless it's a newer young couple it would mostly appeal to single individuals. That's so good amount of $$$ for many. So , i only purchased my second home (townhome this time) last year and even in that amount of time I have seen the asking price for even similar units rise exponentially. So I can see how it would be possible to leave people with no other choice but to consider accepting such high rents. At least from a single person perspective. However, I do have many friends that live and pay to live downtown and have no interest in purchasing a home so I must be a penny pincher. Lol

Last edited by EPdesign; Yesterday at 12:32 PM.
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  #9155  
Old Posted Yesterday, 12:50 PM
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I maintain it's too bold for Salt Lake. When was the last time Salt Lake saw any type of residential remotely similar in that style? A smaller scale, I absolutely believe it'd probably be developed - but I suspect, beyond a few spots in main CBD, and we're talking about the defined city definition - which stretches only as far east as 200 East (it does include the library block to 300 East but that's it), that a development that size, with that look, would get a ton of push back from within the city. Especially the further you got from the center of downtown. There's a reason new development of 10-plus story residential buildings is sparse anywhere in Salt Lake.
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  #9156  
Old Posted Yesterday, 2:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironweed View Post
Is this because people cannot afford to live in those? Utahans have short arms and deep pockets.

Another question: Why does someone need to qualify for affordable housing? If one chooses to live a cheaper apartment, let them.
Because units that are designated as "Affordable" have received tax credits or other financial incentives in order to provide that service. The tax credits/incentives are given to the developer/building owner to as a means to reduce their costs in turn setting aside specific units for specific income ranges.

Those incentives can be things such as Low Income Housing Tax Credits, RDA loans, RDA property, and others.
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  #9157  
Old Posted Today, 1:18 AM
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  #9158  
Old Posted Today, 10:22 AM
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A lot of great news in that report Isaac. Thanks for the time, effort and posting.
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