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  #1181  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 3:49 AM
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jlousa jlousa is offline
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Reading this thead...thank goodness the Ports fall under National jurisdiction and are not at the mercy of civic governments.
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  #1182  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 4:46 AM
casper casper is offline
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Originally Posted by swimmer_spe View Post
So, if getting rid of capacity is not the answer, what about double decking rail lines? Have these owned by Translink for WCE.
Some railway lines are owned by BC Hydro and date back to when they operated street cars. I believe most of these have now been sold or leased with BC Hydro retaining some type of right of usage. The old BC Rail lines are in a similar boat.

A great way of double decking them would be elevated railways. Something along the lines of Skytrain. At that point the discussions shifts into another thread.
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  #1183  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 4:54 AM
swimmer_spe swimmer_spe is offline
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Originally Posted by casper View Post
Some railway lines are owned by BC Hydro and date back to when they operated street cars. I believe most of these have now been sold or leased with BC Hydro retaining some type of right of usage. The old BC Rail lines are in a similar boat.

A great way of double decking them would be elevated railways. Something along the lines of Skytrain. At that point the discussions shifts into another thread.
Not if they are mainline constructed. I imagine once you get beyond those really bad choke points, the elevation could end and it could run with the rest of the train traffic.

It would still be heavy rail.
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  #1184  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 6:09 AM
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VancouverOfTheFuture VancouverOfTheFuture is offline
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Originally Posted by jlousa View Post
Reading this thead...thank goodness the Ports fall under National jurisdiction and are not at the mercy of civic governments.
yes, yes, YES, YES, YES and YES

we need a Like button. or a +1 button.


some of your guy's ideas, im sorry,
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  #1185  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 4:09 PM
aberdeen5698 aberdeen5698 is offline
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Originally Posted by casper View Post
Some railway lines are owned by BC Hydro and date back to when they operated street cars. I believe most of these have now been sold or leased with BC Hydro retaining some type of right of usage. The old BC Rail lines are in a similar boat.
BC Rail still exists and owns and dispatches about 40km of the track that services Roberts Bank. That track was supposed to be sold, but there were irregularities with the bidding process and the sale was ever completed. And I've heard that none of the railways that use the line trust any of the other railways not to grant themselves preferential treatment, so they're very happy with the status quo.
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  #1186  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 4:53 PM
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Alex Mackinnon Alex Mackinnon is offline
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Originally Posted by retro_orange View Post
This may be a fantasy moot point but hear me out. Has the idea ever been floated to relocate the port facilities that are in downtown Vancouver to a new modern facility south of the Fraser, perhaps in Delta, Surrey or Richmond? Is there space on Westham island or Kirkland island if they built up the land to prevent future flooding?

You would need deep water. Anything near the river would need to be way out in the Straight just like Roberts Bank, or require regular dredging to keep in service. Roberts Bank is about 5km from the natural coast line.
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  #1187  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 7:34 PM
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Reecemartin Reecemartin is offline
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Originally Posted by swimmer_spe View Post
Not if they are mainline constructed. I imagine once you get beyond those really bad choke points, the elevation could end and it could run with the rest of the train traffic.

It would still be heavy rail.
Completely true, some bypasses etc would be expensive but I certainly don't think it's out of the realm of possibility.
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  #1188  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 12:50 AM
Henbo Henbo is offline
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Originally Posted by LeftCoaster View Post
Honestly the level of discourse on this forum is really falling off a cliff lately.
Agreed.
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  #1189  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 2:24 AM
Trainguy Trainguy is offline
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Originally Posted by casper View Post
Some railway lines are owned by BC Hydro and date back to when they operated street cars. I believe most of these have now been sold or leased with BC Hydro retaining some type of right of usage. The old BC Rail lines are in a similar boat.

A great way of double decking them would be elevated railways. Something along the lines of Skytrain. At that point the discussions shifts into another thread.
BC Hydro never sold any of the right of way. They just sold the running rights to CP and SRY. Similarly, CN bought the running rights and the rolling stock/certain pieces of land from BC Rail and not the right of way.
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  #1190  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 5:51 AM
casper casper is offline
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Originally Posted by Trainguy View Post
BC Hydro never sold any of the right of way. They just sold the running rights to CP and SRY. Similarly, CN bought the running rights and the rolling stock/certain pieces of land from BC Rail and not the right of way.
Exactly the province (through the crowns) still owns the right of way. That is pretty good leverage to force the railways that operate on that land to play nice with the passenger railways.
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  #1191  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2017, 6:19 AM
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Interesting article on whistle cessation.

6 March 2017
New Westminster Seeks to Silence Train Whistles Downtown

New Westminster British Columbia - Downtown residents may soon be sleeping a little sounder.

New Westminster city council has approved a recommendation prohibiting whistles at Begbie and Front Street plus Fourth Street and Front Street crossings, unless an emergency exists, or a railway safety inspector orders whistle use under a section of the Railway Safety Act.

"It's been a long time coming," said Mayor Jonathan Cote.

"We have been working for a number of years on a whistle cessation program. This is the first achievement, but hopefully it will be the first of a number of crossings where we are able to get the whistles to stop."

Roger Emanuels, the city's manager of design and construction, said the city has been working closely with Transport Canada (TC) and the four railway companies operating in New Westminster, Canadian National, Canadian Pacific, Southern Railway of B.C., and Burlington Northern Santa Fe.

Safety audits have been done to determine what's required to achieve whistle cessation at crossings in the city.

According to a staff report, the cost of improvements at the two downtown crossings was $1,271,000, which was funded out of the city's 2016 capital budget.

Emanuels said the city has been working on city-wide whistle cessation since 2011.

"We have allocated $3.75 million for the improvement of crossings," he said.

"There is a total of 22 crossings in the city. Of those, 13 are public crossings and the public crossings are the type of crossings where we require bells, lights, and gates in order to obtain cessation of the whistling."

In addition to costs associated with preparing crossings for whistle cessation, Emanuels said there will also be annual costs for operating and maintaining equipment at these crossings.

Along with the two downtown crossings, the city is also working to put an end to train whistles at crossings in Queensborough, the West End, Sapperton, Derwent Way and Salter Street, Ewen Avenue and Stanley Street, Ewen Avenue and Mercer Street, Ewen Avenue and Furness Street, Ewen Avenue and Brookes Street, 20th Stret and River Drive, Quayside Drive and Laguna Court, Cumberland Street and Columbia Street, Spruce Street and Brunette Avenue, Braid Street and Brunette Avenue, (two sets of crossings at this location.)

Theresa McManus.
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