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  #5041  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2017, 4:13 PM
bradnixon bradnixon is offline
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It appears that an area of land west of Trainyards (previously planned to be office buildings) are now proposed to be residential buildings.

Brownfield remediation grant is coming forward this week: http://app05.ottawa.ca/sirepub/cache...7111147934.PDF

Quote:
1663321 Ontario Inc. is redeveloping the property at 200, 230 and 260 Steamline Street
to accommodate six residential buildings ranging from 10 storeys to 30 storeys with
underground parking. It is estimated there will be approximately 1,779 apartment units,
77 bachelor units, 333 one-bedroom units, 804 one-bedroom plus den units, 290 two
bedroom units, 62 two bedroom plus den units and 213 three bedroom units over a total
gross floor area of 1,711,462 square feet (159,003 square metres).
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  #5042  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2017, 8:30 PM
OTSkyline OTSkyline is offline
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OOoooouuuu thats exciting! Definitely a great location with the 417, Trainyards, Train LRT stop, VIA rail station and the new office towers up across the street.

Now let's wait to see renders and also hope for better pedestrian connectivity to trainyards and the tunnel/connection to the VIA/LRT stop everyone has been inquiring about.
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  #5043  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2017, 10:00 PM
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rocketphish rocketphish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradnixon View Post
It appears that an area of land west of Trainyards (previously planned to be office buildings) are now proposed to be residential buildings.

Brownfield remediation grant is coming forward this week: http://app05.ottawa.ca/sirepub/cache...7111147934.PDF
Nice find! I've started a thread for it over here:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show....php?p=7720465
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  #5044  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2017, 6:03 PM
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Ottawa looking to end expensive property tax rebate program
Program that gives refunds to landlords has cost more than $80 million over last six years.

By: Ryan Tumilty, Metro
Published on Mon Mar 06 2017


The city is looking at ending a tax-rebate program that has doubled in cost over the last six years, returning more than $80 million to owners of properties that aren't fully occupied.

The vacancy-rebate program gives proportionate tax rebates to owners of commercial and industrial properties that don't fill all the space in their buildings.

A landlord that fails to rent all the space in a downtown building, for example, can apply for a property-tax rebate of up to 30 per cent.

Over the last six years, the city has given out 6,000 such rebates. The city has sent about $59 million to landlords over that time, with another $23 million in education property taxes also rebated. The cost of administering the program adds another approximately $3 million.

In 2009, the program cost $9.2 million; in 2015 it cost $18.3 million.

Wendy Stephanson, the city’s deputy treasurer, said they’re doing consultations on the program this month, looking at everything from scaling back the program to simply ending it.

The provincial government said last year that municipalities would have more flexibility in the rebate program.

Stephanson said right now landowners have to provide proof their space has been vacant for at least 90 days and that they have attempted to lease it.

She said the city can’t get into whether the landlord is seeking a reasonable lease price or whether they have actually invested in improving the space.

“The quality doesn’t come into place at all. It’s really just trying to prove an indication to the city that you’re trying to get the space leased.”

She said they believe landlords want their space rented, but they’re worried right now the rebate program sends the wrong message.

“This program doesn’t necessarily incentivize behaviour,” she said.

Coun. Mathieu Fleury said he believes it’s time to end the rebate.

“I don’t understand why we would give that type of incentive for property owners, especially on ground floor commercial on main streets,” he said.

Fleury said he often hears from constituents who see space sit vacant, taking vibrancy out of the community.

http://www.metronews.ca/news/ottawa/...e-program.html
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  #5045  
Old Posted Mar 6, 2017, 10:12 PM
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1overcosc 1overcosc is offline
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About friggen time. There shouldn't be an incentive to keep a space unoccupied. If anything unoccupied spaces should be taxed more.
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  #5046  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2017, 10:48 PM
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Originally Posted by 1overcosc View Post
About friggen time. There shouldn't be an incentive to keep a space unoccupied. If anything unoccupied spaces should be taxed more.
No kidding. Exhibit A. victims (or soon to be victims, see Somerset House) of demolishion by neglect.
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  #5047  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2017, 5:35 PM
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Commercial landlords blast city over possible end to tax rebate

Jon Willing, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: March 10, 2017 | Last Updated: March 10, 2017 7:00 AM EST


Commercial landlords who have enjoyed millions in property tax breaks to offset lost revenue from empty units are bashing the City of Ottawa for planning to eliminate the juicy rebates.

“To suddenly throw a program out when you’ve got a period of time when you want to encourage economic development, you want to encourage growth and you don’t want to impose new taxes on people, that’s not the time to do it,” said Bernie Myers, Morguard Investment’s vice-president of office and industrial in Eastern Canada.

Morguard is the largest commercial landlord in downtown Ottawa, but Myers said “this is a very serious issue” for landlords of every size.

The city has offered annual tax rebates – 30 per cent for commercial and 35 per cent for industrial – if parts of those buildings are vacant for 90 consecutive days. The province mandates the rebate but now it’s open to making changes, prompting the city to pursue closing the program.

Mayor Jim Watson has been calling for the province to shut down the commercial tax “loophole.”

The tax rebate is costing the city big money.

The 2016 city budget ended in an operational surplus, but handing out vacancy tax breaks, in combination with remissions from property assessment appeals, officially put the budget in a deficit position.

Landlords say the city would be ignoring history. In 1998, commercial landlords took responsibility to collect the former business occupancy tax from tenants and the city, in turn, collected the amount through property taxes. The vacancy rebate was developed in recognition of those unoccupied units.

Dean Karakasis, executive director of the Building Owners and Managers Association of Ottawa (BOMA), said the city saved millions of dollars from not having to administer the business occupancy tax system.

“You could argue whether 17 years later is so far ago that we should forget this,” Karakasis said. “We haven’t forgotten it. We know where it is.”

According to the city, there were about $59.2 million worth of municipal tax breaks spread across nearly 6,000 vacancy rebate applications between 2009 and 2015. The total impact increases to $85.3 million when rebates on education taxes, costs to administer the program and interest are also added. Annual program costs doubled in 2015 compared to 2009.

“The reality is, people who have empty buildings right now have absolutely no incentive or very little incentive to fill the buildings,” Watson said. “As a result, we have buildings that have been vacant in some instances for years and they’re getting a substantial break in taxes, which means every other property owner is subsidizing these big stores or corporations or, in fact, the Government of Canada.”

The feds are a significant landlord and their downsize in office space is also driving the commercial vacancies.

Watson also bemoaned “slumlords” who don’t fix up commercial buildings for occupancy and enjoy paying fewer property taxes to the city.

On the other hand, Myers of Morguard said almost all landlords would rather have a tenant paying rent than collect a small tax rebate.

BOMA, which has published a position paper on the city’s plan, complains about a “lack of transparency” in developing options on the future of the rebate.

The city is going through consultations and has come up with three proposals: erase the rebate now, erase the rebate in phases or erase the rebate gradually for each property.

In other words, the city wants to stop the tax rebate, sooner or later. Landlords have been told the city wants to present recommendations to council’s finance and economic development committee in April.

“When a consultation already has three proposals that are basically the same, it’s not really a consultation as it is an imposition,” Myers said.

BOMA could put forward other options for the city to consider.

Watson doesn’t want to hear arguments from the industry that simply call for the status quo.

“I’ll listen to their feedback,” Watson said, “but they can’t simply come and say, ‘We’re not going to pay’.”

Responded Karakasis: “We understand that. We would like to sit down and get all of these issues identified clearly, the goals we want to accomplish, and then develop a solution.”

jwilling@postmedia.com
twitter.com/JonathanWilling

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...-to-tax-rebate
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  #5048  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2017, 11:27 AM
Buggys Buggys is offline
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Wow, if I go away for 3 months, I want a property tax rebate for my house too!
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  #5049  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2017, 10:27 PM
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Awesome news for Ottawa and Downtown!!

Shopify to triple size of Ottawa headquarters

JAMES BAGNALL, OTTAWA CITIZEN
Published on: March 20, 2017 | Last Updated: March 20, 2017 4:43 PM EDT


Given its rapid sales trajectory it was only a matter of time Shopify would outgrow its state-of-the-art headquarters building at 150 Elgin St.

That 170,000-square-foot facility was outfitted just three years ago. But last week Shopify Inc. signed a lease to eventually take over an additional 325,000 square feet of nearby office space at 234 Laurier Ave. — best known as the former headquarters of the Export Development Corp., a federal crown corporation.

“Ottawa may be one of the best places in the world right now to build a multibillion-dollar business,” said Harley Finkelstein, Shopify’s chief operating officer. “In fact, we consider Ottawa to be one of Shopify’s competitive advantages.”

Shopify will begin fitting up floors two through six this July, with employees starting to move in early in 2018, according to the terms of the multi-year lease with Gillin Engineering & Construction and Slate Asset Management. Plans call for Shopify workers to fill an additional four to five floors each year until all 19 floors are occupied.

“Our problem has always been not having enough space,” said Greg Scorsone, director of internal operations at Shopify. He added he was “very confident” the company would eventually fill it.


All of this is heavily contingent on Shopify’s success in selling its software to online merchants around the globe. On current trends, Shopify’s headquarters operation would reach about 3,000 employees by year-end 2021.

This compares with 750 employees currently. Shopify also employs 1,150-plus workers outside the national capital region, with offices in Toronto (300 employees), Kitchener-Waterloo (170), Montreal (90) and San Francisco (20). The e-commerce firm also employs nearly 600 technical experts who operate from home offices, mainly in Europe and across North America.

http://ottawacitizen.com/business/lo...a-headquarters
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  #5050  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2017, 10:31 PM
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In the next 10-20 years, they'll have to seriously consider building their own office tower. Le Breton Flats?
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  #5051  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 2:20 AM
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Harley613 Harley613 is offline
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Didn't the Bank of Canada just spend a fortune retrofitting 234 Laurier? They are vacating?
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  #5052  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 12:15 PM
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They moved to 234 temporarily while the Bank of Canada building was under renovation. As far as I can see passing by it a few times a week, it seems they've moved back in.

Surprised the article didn't mention the Bank of Canada's stint in 234.
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  #5053  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 12:37 PM
citydwlr citydwlr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J.OT13 View Post
They moved to 234 temporarily while the Bank of Canada building was under renovation. As far as I can see passing by it a few times a week, it seems they've moved back in.
Your mention of the Bank of Canada building made me think about the Currency Museum next door. Apparently, it should be opening this Summer. They also registered a new address specifically for the museum:
30 Bank Street

More info at the following blog post:
http://www.bankofcanadamuseum.ca/201...uction-part-6/

Also, they seem to have some new branding (image too large to post):
http://www.bankofcanadamuseum.ca/201...uction-part-5/
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  #5054  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 1:37 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
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Originally Posted by J.OT13 View Post
Awesome news for Ottawa and Downtown!!

Shopify to triple size of Ottawa headquarters

JAMES BAGNALL, OTTAWA CITIZEN
Published on: March 20, 2017 | Last Updated: March 20, 2017 4:43 PM EDT


Given its rapid sales trajectory it was only a matter of time Shopify would outgrow its state-of-the-art headquarters building at 150 Elgin St.

That 170,000-square-foot facility was outfitted just three years ago. But last week Shopify Inc. signed a lease to eventually take over an additional 325,000 square feet of nearby office space at 234 Laurier Ave. — best known as the former headquarters of the Export Development Corp., a federal crown corporation.

“Ottawa may be one of the best places in the world right now to build a multibillion-dollar business,” said Harley Finkelstein, Shopify’s chief operating officer. “In fact, we consider Ottawa to be one of Shopify’s competitive advantages.”

Shopify will begin fitting up floors two through six this July, with employees starting to move in early in 2018, according to the terms of the multi-year lease with Gillin Engineering & Construction and Slate Asset Management. Plans call for Shopify workers to fill an additional four to five floors each year until all 19 floors are occupied.

“Our problem has always been not having enough space,” said Greg Scorsone, director of internal operations at Shopify. He added he was “very confident” the company would eventually fill it.


All of this is heavily contingent on Shopify’s success in selling its software to online merchants around the globe. On current trends, Shopify’s headquarters operation would reach about 3,000 employees by year-end 2021.

This compares with 750 employees currently. Shopify also employs 1,150-plus workers outside the national capital region, with offices in Toronto (300 employees), Kitchener-Waterloo (170), Montreal (90) and San Francisco (20). The e-commerce firm also employs nearly 600 technical experts who operate from home offices, mainly in Europe and across North America.

http://ottawacitizen.com/business/lo...a-headquarters
They also recently leased another 60,000 sq ft currently under construction in Uptown Waterloo that will reportedly provide space for up to 400 workers. Their current Waterloo office, in the old Seagrams Distillery museum, can house up to 300 employees.
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  #5055  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 4:51 PM
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Advocates pitch ideas for Civic pharmacy sign as building goes up for sale
Sign an example of Googie architecture

By: Ryan Tumilty, Metro News
Published on Sun Mar 19 2017




An iconic Ottawa sign could be operating on borrowed time as the building it’s attached to is up for sale.

The Civic Pharmacy building on the corner of Carling and Holland is on the market for $3.36 million. The building has stood on the corner since 1959, and the pharmacy sign was one of the featured attractions when it opened.

Most Ottawans will recognize the sign: five multicoloured boxes, which used to rotate, sitting at staggered heights on pedestals, emblazoned with black letters spelling out C-I-V-I-C.

Local blogger Andrew King wrote about the sign on his site Ottawa Rewind earlier this month. He said the sign is an example of Googie architecture, which is becoming harder to come by.

“Googie architecture is a style of modern futurist architecture that evolved through the Atomic Age of the 1950s and 1960s culture, with jets, and the space-age being inspiration to its style,” King wrote.

Leslie Maitland, co-chair of Heritage Ottawa, said the building itself is just OK, but the sign has to be preserved.

“It’s an OK example of mid-century modern, but the sign is an Ottawa icon,” she said. “It’s very representative of that era, think of the '60’s and the Bond films.”

Maitland said seeking a heritage designation for the building, just to save the sign, might be an overstep.

“It seems like using a cannon to swat a fly,” she said.

She said the sign needs to be protected, but that doesn’t mean the building itself has to stay.

“It should find a home where people can see it, but we can be imaginative about where it might end up.”

Maitland suggested the Ottawa Art Gallery could be a home for the sign, but said there are a lot of possibilities to preserve the sign if it needs to be saved.

“It could find a home anywhere all over the city, which is a really fun thing to consider.” she said.

Metro attempted to interview the realtor of the building and building owners, but our interview requests were not returned.

http://www.metronews.ca/news/ottawa/...-trouble-.html
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  #5056  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 4:58 PM
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Restore it and move it to the corner of Sherwood and Carling when that intersection is rebuilt; two-for-one: public art and "gateway feature" for the Civic Hospital neighbourhood.
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  #5057  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 7:33 PM
Uhuniau Uhuniau is offline
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This is public art I can get behind.

Too bad it couldn't be repurposed in the much-nearer-term for the LRT station at the Civic hospital.
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  #5058  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 9:53 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
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This reminds me - were matters ever settled regarding the old Mellos sign from Dalhousie? Where is it at?
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  #5059  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2017, 2:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Article

Ford to create Ottawa 'Innovation Centre'

Ford has announced it will create a $338-million innovation centre in Ottawa to develop new automotive technologies.

The operation is expected to create almost 300 news jobs.

The centre will be developing the next generation of automobiles, including driverless cars.

Ford will be working closely with Blackberry-owned QNX Systems, an Ottawa-based firm that is a world leader in vehicle software.

It's part of a $500-million package announced by the company Thursday.

The federal and Ontario governments will be chipping about $100-million in conditional grants.
Super news. Clearly Ottawa is becoming a focal point for this industry.

http://www.iheartradio.ca/580-cfra/n...ntre-1.2507885
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  #5060  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2017, 5:18 PM
TheGoods TheGoods is offline
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Originally Posted by ac888yow View Post
Super news. Clearly Ottawa is becoming a focal point for this industry.

http://www.iheartradio.ca/580-cfra/n...ntre-1.2507885
This is good news but I am a bit hesitant, if you read the Globe article:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...ticle34487030/

and the following quote
Quote:
Many of the engineers will come from BlackBerry Inc., whose QNX system is the operating system for much of the infotainment apparatus in Ford vehicles.
how many of these jobs are new or have they just moved over the QNX employees from Blackberry to Ford.

Here more info to backup the claim that it is a transfer and not really new creation of jobs since QNX employees are suing Blackberry for the Ford deal:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor...ticle34056298/
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