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  #36661  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2017, 5:08 AM
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J_M_Tungsten J_M_Tungsten is offline
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Speaking of Perkins + Will, demolition is well underway on the old student housing across from Rush University Medical Center in Ashland and Harrison. Seems sporadic how they are doing the demo across the site.
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  #36662  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2017, 2:26 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
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Does anybody have any updates on the Congress Theater rehab plan and nearby 10 story building?
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  #36663  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2017, 2:46 PM
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Well... extending the Riverwalk south from Lake is tricky. The channel of the river can't really be narrowed or it would impede navigation, and the South Branch still sees significant freight traffic as well as tour and pleasure boats.

However, there is the existing and continuous Riverside Plaza at the upper level that stretches south to Jackson. You could extend the upper level walkway from Jackson to Van Buren, then a long ramp that dips under Congress to meet up with Harrison. Cross back over the river at Harrison and you're at the start of Riverline's path. And so on and so forth down to Chinatown. Basically it's a three-block section from Jackson to Harrison for the city to pay for, then developers will fund the rest. Hell, 601W might even build two of those three blocks while redoing the Post Office.

The North Branch is a much more interesting challenge IMO. Lots of legacy industry, lots of jumbled property ownership and disjoint segments of riverwalk already existing, but huge potential for bike commuters. The Riverfront Ordinance already mandates a 30' setback from the river edge, so the city either has to wait for the whole stretch to be redeveloped (*cough Sterling Bay*) or start building floating walkways.
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  #36664  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2017, 2:59 AM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
Does anybody have any updates on the Congress Theater rehab plan and nearby 10 story building?
The apartment building will not start until the theater is done. They are finally making visible signs of progress there with multiple blocks of terracotta being removed for restoration on the exterior and a big pile of what looks like the old iron stairwells from the fly over the stage piled up in the lot. From what I understand they had to cut a hole in the lobby floor to lift out all the ancient mechanical equipment and drop in the new stuff. That will sure be a site to see. There is a two floor high mech room down there with all sorts of access to crazy tunnels and vaulted alleys.
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  #36665  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2017, 3:44 PM
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Today
Wells and Evergreen in Old Town


Just north of the above on Well. There was a one story building here (no loss demo-ing that though). Not sure what plans are now.


Yesterday
Grand and Green (right on the highway)
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  #36666  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2017, 4:32 PM
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Quote:
Mayor unveils combined public housing, library designs — are they more than pretty pictures?
By Blair Kamin


When Mayor Rahm Emanuel's media handlers call, they're not inquiring about my health. They're pitching architecture stories they think will make the mayor look good. This week's offering: City officials on Sunday will unveil designs for three outside-the-box buildings that combine public housing with public libraries.

Nothing wrong with that, at least at first glance. The designs — by John Ronan Architects and the Chicago offices of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and Perkins+Will, all highly respected local firms — put alluring flesh on the concept of "co-location," which links libraries with other public buildings to lower construction costs and increase patronage.
All renderings from the Trib article:


Taylor and Ada - SOM


Western and Pratt - Perkins + Will


4022 N. Elston Ave. - John Ronan
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  #36667  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2017, 6:50 PM
the urban politician the urban politician is offline
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Blair Kamin's commentary as usual trivial NIMBY sounding garbage...
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  #36668  
Old Posted Mar 19, 2017, 10:29 PM
pilsenarch pilsenarch is offline
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^exactly... he's been told to pander to the suburban populist crap...

he's bitching that the community forums weren't held first?! really?! so the best architects in the city can't get the convo started? Kamin is pathetic...
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  #36669  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2017, 6:54 AM
denizen467 denizen467 is offline
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Well presumably he's just being tentative on putting the potential crime problems accompanying public housing right on top of schoolchildren visiting libraries. Especially seeing as libraries are supposed to be placid, inviting places of learning for youth, the elderly, and the whole community. Depending on scale these could be as incompatible as putting a factory next to a single family home tract. Keep in mind public housing, over the medium and long term, can turn out more unpredictably, and be harder to alter, than probably any other type of land use -- why plant the seeds of inevitable future political acrimony (or worse) when you don't have to.

Kamin was just setting out some perspective and pushback against what any thinking journalist in this city would suspect at least could be pure, and possibly reckless, political expediency.
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  #36670  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2017, 12:57 PM
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^Well, I think the point is to get the dialogue started in a healthy way. To suddenly jump to conclusions such as you just did right there ^ and as Kamin did in his column is not helpful. You suddenly assumed that any housing involving public assistance will inevitably be crime-ridden. Kamin suddenly assumed that any process that starts with architect's proposing projects must already be rigged. I personally think it's better to start with a design proposal to develop dialogue than without one. I doubt very highly that any of the design teams developed their programs and projects without considering the policies that would create and sustain them.

They are many examples of 'mixed-income' projects throughout the city. Combining these with libraries, or what are really 'community centers', would appear to me an excellent point to involve designers to begin a conversation on whether this would be a good idea. Kamin shooting it down before the conversation even begins is a bad idea.
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  #36671  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 1:02 AM
Stockerzzz Stockerzzz is offline
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Originally Posted by pilsenarch View Post
You suddenly assumed that any housing involving public assistance will inevitably be crime-ridden.
On average, public housing will have a higher likelihood of crime than market rate housing.

The question is whether it's acceptable to have this small increase next to a public library.
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  #36672  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 3:05 AM
Halsted & Villagio Halsted & Villagio is offline
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Originally Posted by Stockerzzz View Post
On average, public housing will have a higher likelihood of crime than market rate housing.

The question is whether it's acceptable to have this small increase next to a public library.
Not to single you out but why is that? Why is there a higher likelihood of crime? Is it genetic or environmental?

Public housing of the past was a stark, dank, concrete jungle that offered little in the way of emotional and intellectual stimulation. It was a breeding ground for discontent, hopelessness and the crime that inevitably grew therefrom. This new proposal offers a unique dynamic to public housing that we have never seen before -- that's why it is worthy of thoughtful consideration and debate.


And of course you know the answer to my first question.... it was/is environmental.

.

Last edited by Halsted & Villagio; Mar 21, 2017 at 3:17 AM.
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  #36673  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 3:59 AM
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Foot traffic is an excellent crime deterrent, and libraries make foot traffic all but inevitable. Genius to combine the library amenity with any housing complex, subsidized or market-rate.

Last edited by wrab; Mar 21, 2017 at 4:09 AM.
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  #36674  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 1:27 PM
denizen467 denizen467 is offline
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^ And one flying bullet each year is an excellent foot traffic deterrent. Especially discretionary foot traffic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pilsenarch View Post
You suddenly assumed that any housing involving public assistance will inevitably be crime-ridden.
You suddenly assumed that any housing involving public assistance will have no potential for periodic crime. You also suddenly assumed that any concern about some crime is a paranoia that a place is, calling all squad cars, "crime-ridden".

I had written "potential" since the history of public housing here is plenty enough to warrant the notion of "potential". In this specific case, these 3 locations may not have trouble handling 40 units of senior and mixed income housing, though there's no assurance that they'll actually be operated with those restrictions in the near or long term. The general concept of combining these uses warrants a dialogue about the matter, which is what Kamin was setting the tone for; I'm at a loss as to what words constituted "Kamin shooting it down".
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  #36675  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 1:38 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
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tax reform & public housing

anyone have any thoughts or news on how potential federal tax reform under Trump will impact affordable/public housing projects around town? I've read the tax credit value is being discounted by 20-30% in the financial analysis of new projects thus killing many plans.
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  #36676  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 2:11 PM
SamInTheLoop SamInTheLoop is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denizen467 View Post
^ And one flying bullet each year is an excellent foot traffic deterrent. Especially discretionary foot traffic.


You suddenly assumed that any housing involving public assistance will have no potential for periodic crime.

This is preposterous on both counts. Pilsenarch made no such assumption, and it would be silly to. No neighborhood or block in Chicago has no potential for periodic crime.

Also, every neighborhood in the city - from the Gold Coast, to River North, to the Loop, to the West Loop, to Lincoln Park, etc, etc have multiple bullets flying through the air each year.....and I'd be shocked if these relatively rare (for these neighborhoods) occurrences had a meaningful impact in the aggregate on foot traffic.....
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Last edited by SamInTheLoop; Mar 21, 2017 at 3:32 PM.
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  #36677  
Old Posted Mar 21, 2017, 3:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by west-town-brad View Post
anyone have any thoughts or news on how potential federal tax reform under Trump will impact affordable/public housing projects around town? I've read the tax credit value is being discounted by 20-30% in the financial analysis of new projects thus killing many plans.
Not sure if this question came from this article but this was a pretty good read on the topic. https://www.wsj.com/articles/tax-ove...als-1490094003
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  #36678  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 12:19 AM
Stockerzzz Stockerzzz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halsted & Villagio View Post
Not to single you out but why is that? Why is there a higher likelihood of crime? Is it genetic or environmental?
From Edward Glaeser's magnificent book, Triumph of the City:

Quote:
Willie Sutton said he robbed banks because "that's where the money is," but in most cases, crime means poor people robbing other poor people. Crime victims are more likely to be poor, young, and male -- just like criminals.

In much of the world, crime is disproportionately urban. In 1989, more than 20 percent of people living in cities with more than a million people had been crime victims during the previous year, while fewer than a tenth of the residents in towns with under ten thousand people were victims.

. . .

Cities are crime-prone mostly because the poor people who come to cities bring the social problems of poverty, like crime, with them. Cities also encourage crime because urban areas present a dense concentration of potential victims. While it's hard to earn a living as a thief on a lonely country road, the crowds on a subway provide a plethora of pockets to pick.
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  #36679  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 2:34 AM
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Really random question, but besides money, why can't the rail line from Roosevelt to the art institute get capped? Maybe it's just the money piece or air rights or both?
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  #36680  
Old Posted Mar 22, 2017, 2:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J_M_Tungsten View Post
Really random question, but besides money, why can't the rail line from Roosevelt to the art institute get capped? Maybe it's just the money piece or air rights or both?
Or even just start with the easier section, Balbo to the Art Institute. I would then love to see them get rid of that half-circle road by Congress and Michigan, take Congress from an EIGHT lane road down to four lanes east of Michigan, and then take Columbus down to a four lane road with no parking instead of the EIGHT lanes of pavement it is now.

My random question, does anyone know what's going up at Racine and Diversey and Lincoln? I lived on that corner for years and always waited for something to fill the big empty lot on the northwest corner. Something is going up there now, it has a large elevator/stairwell looking thing right in the middle, looks a bit odd at this point.
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