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  #81  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 6:09 AM
officedweller officedweller is offline
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Business people and politicians all take HeliJet - 30 minutes from Seabus heliport to Ogden Point, Victoria.
There's no way a hydrofoil would win that battle.
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  #82  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 6:32 AM
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I think it's around 150 dollars for a one way ticket for Helijet. Most people won't and don't pay that and prefer the long, drawn out journey by BC Ferries which is a lot cheaper at 15 bucks. A jetfoil or foilcat service would be more expensive than BC Ferries but a heck of a lot faster, and a lot less expensive than Helijet. Not sure what the price point would be to make it feasible though.
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  #83  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 6:41 AM
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^ Wait, i'm lost...
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  #84  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 2:17 PM
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Originally Posted by logan5 View Post
I know foot passenger service from Vancouver Island right into Downtown Vancouver has been tried before and failed. I'm not sure how fast the boats were back then, but todays ferries can travel at 83 km/h, which would get you from Nanaimo to D/T Vancouver in around 45 minutes and from Victoria to D/T Vancouver in around 1 hour and 15 minutes. A B.C. ferry takes 1 hour 35 minutes to get from Nanaimo to Horseshoe Bay plus another hour or so to load/unload and drive to D/T Vancouver, for a total of 2 hours and 35 minutes. A time savings of close to 2 hours. Probably a similar time savings for the Victoria route as well. Maybe it's time to give it another shot.
Turn-around time for the ferries is way quicker than an hour. They are on a 2 hour schedule spacing. That's 25 minutes for cars to offload and reload. It's really quick, actually.

You wouldn't save time by having vehicle ferries outside of Horseshoe or TSawassen. It is quicker to drive. As fast as the ferries are capable of going these days, they still couldn't keep up with the pace of an automobile going the equivalent distance. That's not taking into account that the current schedule has the ferries going at far-below peak speed. Fact remains that Horseshoe Bay and Tsawassen are the closest points we have to Naniamo and Victoria respectfully.
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  #85  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 2:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by logan5 View Post
I know foot passenger service from Vancouver Island right into Downtown Vancouver has been tried before and failed. I'm not sure how fast the boats were back then, but todays ferries can travel at 83 km/h, which would get you from Nanaimo to D/T Vancouver in around 45 minutes and from Victoria to D/T Vancouver in around 1 hour and 15 minutes. A B.C. ferry takes 1 hour 35 minutes to get from Nanaimo to Horseshoe Bay plus another hour or so to load/unload and drive to D/T Vancouver, for a total of 2 hours and 35 minutes. A time savings of close to 2 hours. Probably a similar time savings for the Victoria route as well. Maybe it's time to give it another shot.
I don't think there's enough traffic, despite the time savings, to make a passenger ferry route worthwhile. The Island has its own enclosed ecosystem, its own economy. Most businesses that I deal with that do work on the Island have a separate branch office on the Island that does work almost exclusively on the Island. Without a more permanent connection (i.e. bridge) I think that will continue to be the case.
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  #86  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 3:10 PM
WarrenC12 WarrenC12 is offline
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There's no cost effective business model that will work between BC Ferries and the Helijet service as far as island transpost.

Helijet seems expensive, but any passenger ferry from downtown to the island would be charging a premium as well. Remember, BC Ferries doesn't make money, and they charge quite a bit.
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  #87  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 3:16 PM
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The three major routes between the mainland and the Island make money the other routes don't.
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  #88  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 3:21 PM
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All the more reason why it should have stayed a crown corporation.
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  #89  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 5:30 PM
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Are you sure they make money? I know that's what is reported, but I can't believe any of the numbers that come from BC Ferries except the cash injection they get from general provincial revenue every year.

It's possible, but IMO too entwined to figure out.
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  #90  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 8:38 PM
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Back in the day(90's I think) there was a legitimate proposal for a mega ferry terminal on sea island(by the airport) to replace our current two terminals.

I would suspect that the more people they can funnel in to one terminal then the cheaper it would be to provide the service due to economies of scale.

Also regarding the mega terminal on seas island, personally I am happy it didnt go through. Going forward imo its better to have two terminals on both sides of the city instead of one in Richmond(even if it might have been better in the short term). Most people would need to drive through the city to get to it. In the future when its economical, and it doesnt seem to be yet, a passenger ferry can run from downtown to the island to cover the transit oriented market from the center of the city. If you are driving I dont see the issue driving to one of the two terminals on the edges of the city right now, which ever one is closer.
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  #91  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WarrenC12 View Post
There's no cost effective business model that will work between BC Ferries and the Helijet service as far as island transpost.

Helijet seems expensive, but any passenger ferry from downtown to the island would be charging a premium as well. Remember, BC Ferries doesn't make money, and they charge quite a bit.
And add to that seaplanes that also fill the gap as well.
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  #92  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 10:53 PM
fredinno fredinno is offline
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Originally Posted by Canadian Mind View Post
All the more reason why it should have stayed a crown corporation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by cornholio View Post
Back in the day(90's I think) there was a legitimate proposal for a mega ferry terminal on sea island(by the airport) to replace our current two terminals.

I would suspect that the more people they can funnel in to one terminal then the cheaper it would be to provide the service due to economies of scale.

Also regarding the mega terminal on seas island, personally I am happy it didnt go through. Going forward imo its better to have two terminals on both sides of the city instead of one in Richmond(even if it might have been better in the short term). Most people would need to drive through the city to get to it. In the future when its economical, and it doesnt seem to be yet, a passenger ferry can run from downtown to the island to cover the transit oriented market from the center of the city. If you are driving I dont see the issue driving to one of the two terminals on the edges of the city right now, which ever one is closer.
We will never be able to do that, because by then, there wouldn't be space for a terminal like that.
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  #93  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2012, 11:41 PM
incognism incognism is offline
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Originally Posted by officedweller View Post
And add to that seaplanes that also fill the gap as well.
Seaplanes and Helijet are in the same price bracket. There's not much variance in their fares considering their flight times are the same and they have identical customer bases.
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  #94  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2012, 5:47 AM
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Port Metro Vancouver has released its 2011 year-end results, showing a hike in the amount of cargo handled over 2010 and continued growth in key sectors.

According to the release, the port trades $75 billion in goods annually, generating across Canada an estimated 129,500 jobs, $6.1 billion in wages, and $10.5 billion in GDP across Canada.

Silvester called 2011 an encouraging year in the cruise sector, noting that Disney will be returning in 2013 with 16 trips by the Disney Wonder to Vancouver after moving the ship’s home port to Seattle this year.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Yea...#ixzz1lOCKu3VF
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  #95  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2012, 5:00 PM
amor de cosmos amor de cosmos is offline
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2011 another busy year for Port Metro Vancouver
Published: February 06, 2012 3:00 PM
Updated: February 07, 2012 6:39 PM

On the heels of another strong year for Port Metro Vancouver, president and CEO Robin Silvester says the key to continual growth is creating infrastructure that will allow for more robust trade.

On the North Shore, vital projects include the potential re-design of the Low Level Road and the two overpasses — one slated for the Neptune/Cargill terminals, the other in the area of St. Georges Avenue — that go along with it. If completed, a raised road will make room for the addition of two rail lines in the area.

Other projects, adds Silvester, will be conceived of and initiated as port staff "look out and predict" what will be needed to create additional capacity for trade.

Over the last two years, both Neptune Terminals and Kinder Morgan have completed large scale improvements to their organizations, with Neptune installing new stacker-reclaimers to load and unload product more efficiently and Kinder Morgan building a new shiploader.

And with expansion comes an increase in jobs for the region, he says, including the North Shore.

"It's a good news story. Growth means more jobs. There are 80,000 jobs in the Lower Mainland from port activity," says Silvester.
http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/138813699.html
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  #96  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2012, 7:56 PM
amor de cosmos amor de cosmos is offline
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Seaspan launches $200-million shipyard upgrade
Infrastructure investment paves way for $8 billion worth of new vessels

By Gordon Hamilton, Vancouver Sun October 20, 2012

Seaspan kicked off a $200-million upgrade to its North Vancouver shipyard Friday, saying that the redevelopment will launch the rebirth of the West Coast shipbuilding industry.

The shipyard infrastructure investment marks the first major expenditure in B.C. related to the federal National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Seaspan landed the $8-billion federal procurement contract a year ago Friday.

Seaspan will build seven vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy under the contract.

Seaspan president Jonathan Whitworth said the construction project alone will require 150 workers. Seaspan expects the actual shipbuilding project to swell the employment ranks at the North Vancouver site from 200 to 1,200 by 2016, providing stable work over the next decade for shipbuilders on the North Shore.

At a groundbreaking ceremony at the shipyard, called Vancouver Shipyard, Whitworth described the contract as "a true game-changer for the shipbuilding industry."
http://www.vancouversun.com/business...454/story.html

Quote:
Seaspan kicks off billion-dollar B.C. shipyard project with infrastructure construction
By Carla Wilson, Times Colonist October 19, 2012

Seaspan Marine Corp. kicked off $200 million worth of infrastructure construction work this morning, one year to the day the B.C. shipyard won the right to negotiate $8 billion worth of non-combat ships for the federal government.

Company staff and federal and provincial officials were at the Seaspan’s North Vancouver shipyard for the groundbreaking ceremony to launch the upgrading program required to carry out the federal work.

Work will start later, at a date still to be set, at Seaspan’s Victoria Shipyards in Esquimalt, where upgrading will include construction of a multi-purpose building to be used for commissioning and trials of new federal ships.

Facilities improvement was part of Seaspan’s bid to win the non-combat portion of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Irving Shipbuilding, of Nova Scotia, won the $25-billion combat package.

Seaspan expects shipbuilding to begin in the third or fourth quarter of 2013. Three offshore fisheries science vessels, one offshore oceanographic science vessel, one Polar icebreaker, and two joint support ships are planned.

The vast majority of the $200 million going to facilities upgrading will be spent in this province, said Jonathan Whitworth, Seaspan chief executive officer.

“The beginning of construction at our shipyard marks the rebirth of a once thriving shipbuilding business on the BC Coast,” he said.
“Not only are we building a world-class shipyard in North Vancouver, we’re looking forward to revitalizing the ship construction business and to training and growing our workforce by an additional 1,000 employees over the next three years.”

About 60 large contracts will be tendered, he said. Most will in the range of $5 million and $10 million, with one more than $20 million.

Key additions will be four new fabrication buildings, a shipbuilding gantry crane, and a load-out pier. Three buildings will be relocated, existing infrastructure will be upgraded, and about $20 million will be spent on new equipment and tools, Whitworth said.

More than 1,000 tonnes of steel and more than 10,000 cubic metres of concrete will be used, he said.
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Sea...487/story.html
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  #97  
Old Posted Nov 6, 2012, 1:19 AM
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^Excellent news.
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  #98  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2012, 2:36 AM
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South Shore Corridor upgrade

As we're probably aware there are significant plans for the "South Shore Corridor" of Port Metro Vancouver. This roadway project will run from Cascadia to Alliance Grain Terminal which will include an elevated roadway. Areas of improvement have already started. A 50-truck staging area is nearing completion on Commissoner St. just west of New Brighton Park.

There will be lane closures during the upgrade; however, the Port has advised that they would work these instances around the relief times of the port and try to limit the amount of time for the closures.

Attached are some informational links about the project and a site for construction and traffic advisories. Included in the traffic advisory site is some information about the "phasing" process.

http://southshorecorridorproject.com/project-overview/

http://www.portmetrovancouver.com/en...sultation.aspx

www.portmetrovancouver.com/sscproject
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  #99  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2012, 4:22 AM
aberdeen5698 aberdeen5698 is offline
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As we're probably aware there are significant plans for the "South Shore Corridor" of Port Metro Vancouver.
Hopefully these improvements will allow them to start accepting incoming trucks at the Clark Street entrance so that trucks from south of Vancouver don't have to be routed up Nanaimo Street.
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  #100  
Old Posted Dec 8, 2012, 8:37 AM
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City of Vancouver is expropriating the Chevron Gas Station site on Powell Street for the grade separation project:

http://former.vancouver.ca/ctyclerk/...20121211ag.htm
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