HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2013, 11:11 PM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
Burnaby's Metrotown!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Klazu View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jebby View Post
__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2013, 11:25 PM
Wigs's Avatar
Wigs Wigs is offline
NewBuffaloRising
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: St. Catharines-Niagara CMA
Posts: 3,061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico Rommheim View Post
Yes, if compared to mullet-ville
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadillaccc View Post
Is Mullet-ville what you guys call Longueuil? Because if so, that's hilarious
wow, that's great!

Mullet: official hairstyle of Longueuillois (<--not sure how the eff to pronounce lol) Let's party like it's 1985, by's [nod to signal hill ]

back to the thread, the skyline of Burnaby is impressive. what's the tallest?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Sep 7, 2013, 11:33 PM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
The two tallest are currently under construction, they are the two tallest buildings in that photo. Out of frame, the new current tallest building was just completed a month ago, it is called the Chancellor and I believe it is about 120 meters tall. The two UC are 141 meters and 156 meters.


However, apparently in Brentwood (a separate major skyline/neighbourhood) a new tallest was just started, it will be 184 meters tall and is called "Altus," and is a mixed use office/residential/retail tower.
__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2013, 2:14 AM
vanman's Avatar
vanman vanman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 5,017
Props to Klazu!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klazu View Post
Brentwood vs. Metrotown - which has the better skyline now and in the future?





My take is that Metrotown has a better skyline now, but in the future Brentwood will have better, more clustered, skyline.

Another, slightly zoomed-in, angle on Metrotown.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2013, 4:49 AM
ssiguy ssiguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: White Rock BC
Posts: 5,001
Vancouver has done an excellent job of gearing high density developments around SkyTrain stations.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2013, 5:38 AM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
They have for sure, i love it! I'm glad to see Calgary embracing the TOD development style as well.
__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2013, 6:01 AM
Architype's Avatar
Architype Architype is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Pacific Canada
Posts: 6,531
Those are amazing shots of Burnaby, too bad you can't really see the new Metrotower III from that angle though.
__________________
"You can not stop the spread of an idea by passing a law against it."- Harry S. Truman
Photography - Canada East & West | Vancouver BC | St. John's NL
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2013, 7:42 PM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
Here's an interesting article about Exurbanity in Montreal:


Exurban growth in Montreal region is worst in country

Quote:
From 2006 to 2011, the exurban population in the Montreal metropolitan region jumped by 14 per cent, or about 18,500 people, to 149,661.

By comparison, the exurban population of Toronto grew by seven per cent, or 10,000 people. In Vancouver, it increased by four per cent, or 6,000 people.

But that doesn’t tell the whole story. Over those five years, urban sprawl was kept in check in Toronto somewhat, with 52,000 people moving into the city core where condo towers now abound, and another 25,000 people moving to “transit-oriented” suburbs — communities where residents can take the train into the city rather than drive by car.

In Vancouver, a total of 48,000 people moved to the city’s “active core” — where they could bike or walk to work, if they wanted — as well as to the transit-oriented suburbs.

In contrast, the population of Montreal’s active core and the transit suburbs increased by only 6,800 in total.
full story: http://www.montrealgazette.com/busin...348/story.html
__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2013, 3:56 PM
Jimby's Avatar
Jimby Jimby is offline
not a NIMBY
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 8,956

North Vancouver by LUMIN8, on Flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2013, 4:52 PM
LeftCoaster's Avatar
LeftCoaster LeftCoaster is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Torcouver
Posts: 9,633
Nice pic! NV doesn't get any love on this forum but the backdrop is just spectacular.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2013, 5:43 AM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
An incredible Westbrook photo by Boris2K7!


26th Street LRT by RemotelyBoris, on Flickr
__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 12:39 AM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
Here's a couple of the Southland/Heritage skyline cluster. By me.





and the clusters around Chinook...


__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 3:29 PM
M.R.Victor's Avatar
M.R.Victor M.R.Victor is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 127
I think this may be counter to the intention of the thread, but all I get from these photos is that largely, in spite of some noble intentions to add density via high-rises, Canadian suburbs are quite dull and dreary places. What's they point of having suburban downtowns if they're not... more... downtown like? Especially when they deploy close to none of the things that make downtowns work?


It really reminds me of the Simpsons. We've tried nothing and we're fresh out of ideas




But perhaps I'm wrong. Are there any suburban downtowns that function very much like traditional downtowns? Good mixed use, small and large retail, tightly packed housing, a good mix of jobs and residents, good transit connections? I certainly can't come up with any.
__________________
Check out my portfolio work:
Fashion Portraits, Impossible Architecture
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 3:53 PM
niwell's Avatar
niwell niwell is offline
you go on ahead
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Parkdale, Toronto
Posts: 7,302
Quote:
Originally Posted by M.R.Victor View Post

But perhaps I'm wrong. Are there any suburban downtowns that function very much like traditional downtowns? Good mixed use, small and large retail, tightly packed housing, a good mix of jobs and residents, good transit connections? I certainly can't come up with any.
Depends if you are looking for downtowns "from scratch", or the historic cores of cities that have been swallowed by the suburbs. If it's the former then I'm not so sure - the latter, definitely, with varying degrees of success.

I'm only really familiar with the GTA but I would say that downtown Burlington is one of the better examples. Oakville is good as well, but can be a bit too upscale to be considered fully functional (it does have jobs though). The only problem with these is they function as nice downtowns of places with maybe ~50,000, not 150,000.


Port Credit and Whitby also come to mind as ok examples, though they may be lacking in the jobs and transit department. I'm hesitant to include Oshawa as it's closer to a stand-alone city, and the rest of the older downtowns are more or less relegated to retail uses. Also not counting North York or Toronto's other centres as I think they are a different beast entirely.

Of the "new" downtowns I have mixed feelings about Mississauga City Centre. It has potential but the original built form was awful and the long-term plans have to accommodate this. I'm interested to see what happens with downtown Markham in the next decade or so. This was truly from scratch and on paper looks a lot better, but so far it's a bit monotonous.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 4:28 PM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
A couple if examples in Metro Vancouver would be New Westminster of course (very arguably Canada's most urban suburb), and Metrotown. Both have good or half decent urban design and planning, at least one street packed with street front retail, interesting architecture, tons of office space, and very high population density.

New Westminster has the distinction of being older than its core city though, which is quite unique among suburbs. Also the fact that it was the original capital of mainland BC adds to that. Ive lived in both Metrotown and New West and they could easily pass for major cities in their own right. Metrotown still has a bit of a way to go, but they're getting there very quickly.


Also, while the ones in Calgary may be unappealing at present, that doesn't mean they will be forever. They are still in infancy with new towers and new ideas always coming in. London at Heritage Station is a good example, as is the potential of that stretch of Macleod Trail.
__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 4:51 PM
Beedok Beedok is offline
Exiled Hamiltonian
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 6,334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadillaccc View Post
New Westminster has the distinction of being older than its core city though, which is quite unique among suburbs.
Quite unique, but not super unique. At one point Ancaster was larger than Hamilton or Toronto. (It currently has pretty well no urban fabric though.)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 5:23 PM
WhipperSnapper's Avatar
WhipperSnapper WhipperSnapper is offline
I am the law!
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Toronto+
Posts: 14,704
Metrotown is a bunch of towers in a park anchored by a mall with a lrt station. It's prettier than MCC (point vs slab and decked parking vs acres of surface parking) however, hardly what I'd call a downtown. Never being to New West.
__________________
53 built and 26 under construction for a total of 79 towers over 150 metres.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 5:35 PM
Jimby's Avatar
Jimby Jimby is offline
not a NIMBY
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Calgary
Posts: 8,956
I like how Lower Lonsdale in North Vancouver is evolving into a downtown, although the population on the North Shore is low compared to other cities in Metro Vancouver.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 5:45 PM
Chadillaccc's Avatar
Chadillaccc Chadillaccc is offline
ARTchitecture
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cala Ghearraidh
Posts: 18,514
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhipperSnapper View Post
Metrotown is a bunch of towers in a park anchored by a mall with a lrt station. It's prettier than MCC (point vs slab and decked parking vs acres of surface parking) however, hardly what I'd call a downtown. Never being to New West.
What are you talking about? Have you ever even been or walked around for any length of time there? Having spent an hour or two in the mall doesn't count. Also, since when is the Skytrain an LRT? Are we really that desperate to grasp at straws just to put other places down?

Kingsway is an entire street of streetfront retail through metrotown. There's no park anywhere near the mall, except Central Park about a km away (gorgeous park btw), and as I said, it's not quite there yet, but it is getting there fast. With Sovereign, Station Square, Metroplace, the Metrotower Complex, Chancellor, the redevelopment of the parking lot of The Bay, there's no doubting Metrotown's plan and capability to become one of the most urban suburbs in the country. Especially considering it already has an entire street with brick faced pedestrian scale older buildings full of retail and opportunities for beautification running straight through it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimby View Post
I like how Lower Lonsdale in North Vancouver is evolving into a downtown, although the population on the North Shore is low compared to other cities in Metro Vancouver.
Me too man. Pretty much all of Lonsdale is great. Would be cool if they built a tram up the hill to make it more accessible too! Hopefully one day! The Quay is my favorite place down there. We always used to go to the East Side Mario's there! Yummm
__________________
Strong & free

'My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.' — Jack Layton
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2013, 7:33 PM
Boris2k7's Avatar
Boris2k7 Boris2k7 is offline
Majestic
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Calgary
Posts: 11,922
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhipperSnapper View Post
Metrotown is a bunch of towers in a park anchored by a mall with a lrt station. It's prettier than MCC (point vs slab and decked parking vs acres of surface parking) however, hardly what I'd call a downtown. Never being to New West.


Same can be said for anything outside of the core in Calgary. We are getting some pretty good concentrations of towers, but there's nothing that functions as a second downtown... yet.

I have some hopes for Manchester Industrial accomplishing this somewhere down the line (it already has some affordable housing, major retail, a concentration of offices and light industrial, some social services, an LRT station -- two if you include 39th -- and an ARP/SAP that is very development-minded).
__________________
"The only thing that gets me through our winters is the knowledge that they're the only thing keeping us free of giant ass spiders." -MonkeyRonin

Flickr

Last edited by Boris2k7; Sep 17, 2013 at 8:17 PM. Reason: clarify which city i'm talking about
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:58 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.