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  #21  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 2:51 PM
Yegger Yegger is offline
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Originally Posted by thebasketballgeek View Post
I have been to Edmonton and I have been to Calgary in summer 2011. Their is one major difference. the amount of people in the inner city. I'm probably way off as I went to Calgary during the stampede so I don't know about that. Also now the new arena will be in downtown so that may make it more lively on occasions. Anyways when I went to Calgary their was a lot of people downtown. I didn't for a whole day so I saw it for a few hours because my hotel was in Lake Louise. During that time in Calgary it seemed so lively and this area was right next to a surface parking lot. While in Edmonton I stayed for 2 nights their because we got a good deal at the coast Edmonton house. The downtown was dead basically the whole time. For me it seemed like the West Edmonton Mall area was actually the more lively area. Well in 3 years it might have changed I don't know.
Hah. I wish Calgary during stampede was indicative of the city at other times, but yeah...that's a pretty special case. One of the things that shocked me about Edmonton was actually the activity downtown off business hours. Edmonton can't compete with Calgary during a weekday, there just isn't the workforce flooding the core here. That being said, Edmonton has less of a massive business district thing going on and in my opinion suffers less from the 9-5 phenomenon. And yeah, I moved here in 2011 and both cities have gotten much better. Part of what I meant by the distinct evolution of the cities is that Calgary has been building a premier business district and the neighbourhood aspect is coming more now, but secondary. The residential and neighbourhood amenity aspect is more prominent in Edmonton where it's hard to compete with Calgary on the corporate level.

And yeah, many other cities get ignored too, I'm just most familiar with these two and the imbalance between them is significant
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  #22  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 6:06 PM
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Sorry Black Star, I have to agree in full with Yegger on this one. We are constantly ignored and underestimated on the national stage. I've had arguments with people on this forum (different subforum though) who thought Edmonton was in the same tier with smaller cities like Halifax. Obviously population isn't everything, but it does count for something, not to mention the economic might of Edmonton and the oodles of opportunities. But I guess in a way it's not that surprising, based on how often Edmonton seems to come up, most would be lead to believe it is in a tier with smaller centres and the impression is that Calgary is much bigger, when it isn't.

I personally find it frustrating. Even in casual conversation, the go-to Alberta example 99% of the time is Calgary. In city comparisons, Calgary comes up so often, whereas Edmonton is rarely mentioned. On the national news, a story from Edmonton will end with someone reporting live from Calgary (I'm looking at you, CTV).


While yes in a way it's nice to see the "I don't give a fuck attitude" on occasion, I find in most cases it's more a case of genuine self-loathing or believing the stereotypes or whatever. We also suffer from a large contingent who live beyond the ring road and complain about how boring Edmonton is, but never visit downtown or other inner areas. These same people will hit up 17th in Calgary, Granville Island in Vancouver, and St-Catherine Street in Montreal. I do agree that we could learn a thing or two from Calgary's boosterism.

I do see you're point of view. And its certainly has been an Identity problem for Edmonton on the marketing front in the past. As for my experience being in the Oil and Gas industry for the last 20 years I've been traveling with work to many major centers here in Canada and the U.S. I look at myself as a litmus test of sorts. I see the recognition of Edmonton as a business center and a cultural center a lot more prevalent in my circle of business in the last 5 years.

Compared to years past to me this is a Hugh step In the right direction. There is still work to do to have Edmonton at the level where I think it should be. But imo the Image and Name recognition For Edmonton is far more than what it was 5 years ago.
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  #23  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 6:33 PM
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WAM 10th Avenue

Completion: Q2 2016
Size: 20 and 35 storeys (approx. 70 and 120 meters)
Location: 10th Avenue, directly next to Mark on Tenth, a block north of the Aura twins.






http://www.wamdevelopment.com/projects/10th-avenue-sw/
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  #24  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 6:54 PM
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Let's all remember the abortion of a project this is replacing (the defunct "Astoria on 10th" - got to grade until the crash happened).


Last edited by Wooster; Mar 23, 2014 at 7:09 PM.
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  #25  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 7:03 PM
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looks like something they would build in Mississauga.
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  #26  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 7:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
looks like something they would build in Mississauga.
I was thinking Hamilton.
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  #27  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 7:09 PM
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looks like something they would build in Mississauga.
Exactly - basically this:



Thank goodness we dodged that bullet.
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  #28  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 7:11 PM
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Is that chimney scaffolding looking thing a clock tower in the middle?
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  #29  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 7:17 PM
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Is that chimney scaffolding looking thing a clock tower in the middle?
Better yet - it's the Mississauga City Hall clock tower.
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  #30  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 7:27 PM
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Yeah! The WAM project looks so much better than Astoria!

However, let us be thankful that almost Astoria happened, because without it, the WAM project wouldn't be able to start right at grade with a parking garage already constructed This thing is going to make an impact only months after it starts! That is definitely something to be happy about. That entire block is going to be a huge dense block of retail with like 1000 people living on it (about 750 units).
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  #31  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 7:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thebasketballgeek View Post
I have been to Edmonton and I have been to Calgary in summer 2011. Their is one major difference. the amount of people in the inner city. I'm probably way off as I went to Calgary during the stampede so I don't know about that. Also now the new arena will be in downtown so that may make it more lively on occasions. Anyways when I went to Calgary their was a lot of people downtown. I didn't for a whole day so I saw it for a few hours because my hotel was in Lake Louise. During that time in Calgary it seemed so lively and this area was right next to a surface parking lot. While in Edmonton I stayed for 2 nights their because we got a good deal at the coast Edmonton house. The downtown was dead basically the whole time. For me it seemed like the West Edmonton Mall area was actually the more lively area. Well in 3 years it might have changed I don't know.
Well, technically, Chinook Centre is more lively year-round too.

I'm not sure when exactly you visited Edmonton (week, weekend?). During the week, if you just came from Calgary during the Stampede, then yeah, no contest. Even outside of that, with double the workforce population, Downtown Calgary will undoubtedly be busier on average.

However, the weekends during the summer always have some large festival going on downtown. Around Stampede, I'm guessing it would've been Street Performers or Taste of Edmonton. On Saturdays, there's also the City Market, outdoors, which is pretty busy as well. Not to mention the growing dining/nightlife scene for later on.

And of course, on the other side of the river, you'd find Old Strathcona, which is usually pretty busy on weekends and evenings. Though it would only compare to 17th during Stampede when the Fringe is on in August. But normally, they're both comparable in terms of vibrancy, maybe a slight edge to Old Strathcona due to the plethora of theatres and of course the weekly market.
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  #32  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 8:07 PM
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Thunder Bay Civic Centre - $106 million


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Originally Posted by btimmis1 View Post
The city of Thunder Bay has issued a "Request for Expressions of Interest" for potential partners and business partners for the proposed $106 Million Thunder Bay Event Centre. The new centre would be built on the site of the current Water Street bus terminal in downtown Port Arthur. A much needed and overdue project for the city. The Fort William Gardens has held up pretty well, but it's time to move forward.

Apparently the Winnipeg Jets are looking at moving their AHL team to Thunder Bay if a new arena is built. Personally, I'm not sure if there is enough support (by support I mean $$$) for that team in addition to the strong community support for the LU Thunderwolves, but maybe the improved travel situation for players to and from Winnipeg means they can accept reduced revenue?

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunde...ners-1.1309730
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfou...ckey-1.2505192

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  #33  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 8:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
looks like something they would build in Mississauga.
Yep, Kirkor at its finest.
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  #34  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 8:17 PM
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Originally Posted by O-tacular View Post
Is that chimney scaffolding looking thing a clock tower in the middle?
Yep, PoMo at its finest.
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  #35  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 9:20 PM
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UE has a valid point. Edmonton does not get its fair share of recognition, and Calgary may be partly to blame. It's just one of those things that takes time to change. Much like Calgary's redneck reputation that is finally going away, but is taking time.
Someone posted an article on here a few years ago that said that the word 'Calgary' is mentioned three times as many times as the word 'Edmonton' in Nation media, and five times the amount in international media. That was from a study a few years back, so might not be the accurate today.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ue View Post
Sorry Black Star, I have to agree in full with Yegger on this one. We are constantly ignored and underestimated on the national stage. I've had arguments with people on this forum (different subforum though) who thought Edmonton was in the same tier with smaller cities like Halifax. Obviously population isn't everything, but it does count for something, not to mention the economic might of Edmonton and the oodles of opportunities. But I guess in a way it's not that surprising, based on how often Edmonton seems to come up, most would be lead to believe it is in a tier with smaller centres and the impression is that Calgary is much bigger, when it isn't.

I personally find it frustrating. Even in casual conversation, the go-to Alberta example 99% of the time is Calgary. In city comparisons, Calgary comes up so often, whereas Edmonton is rarely mentioned. On the national news, a story from Edmonton will end with someone reporting live from Calgary (I'm looking at you, CTV).

While yes in a way it's nice to see the "I don't give a fuck attitude" on occasion, I find in most cases it's more a case of genuine self-loathing or believing the stereotypes or whatever. We also suffer from a large contingent who live beyond the ring road and complain about how boring Edmonton is, but never visit downtown or other inner areas. These same people will hit up 17th in Calgary, Granville Island in Vancouver, and St-Catherine Street in Montreal. I do agree that we could learn a thing or two from Calgary's boosterism.
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  #36  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 9:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Yegger View Post
Hah. I wish Calgary during stampede was indicative of the city at other times, but yeah...that's a pretty special case. One of the things that shocked me about Edmonton was actually the activity downtown off business hours. Edmonton can't compete with Calgary during a weekday, there just isn't the workforce flooding the core here. That being said, Edmonton has less of a massive business district thing going on and in my opinion suffers less from the 9-5 phenomenon. And yeah, I moved here in 2011 and both cities have gotten much better. Part of what I meant by the distinct evolution of the cities is that Calgary has been building a premier business district and the neighbourhood aspect is coming more now, but secondary. The residential and neighbourhood amenity aspect is more prominent in Edmonton where it's hard to compete with Calgary on the corporate level.

And yeah, many other cities get ignored too, I'm just most familiar with these two and the imbalance between them is significant
I don’t know what you mean by “neighborhood aspect”, but I do feel that both Edmonton and Calgary are underrated for their urban landscape and cultural offerings.
With Calgary though, people tend to see the extent of downtown as the commercial core and overlook the Beltline, Eau Claire, and Chinatown ext. This is understandable as it’s the most prominent area in the city, but people should consider the surrounding area’s before making sweeping assumptions that Calgary has a dead downtown after 5pm.
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  #37  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 9:50 PM
ue ue is offline
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I think Calgary has us beat in terms of corporate culture, but we have them marginally beat on cultural amenities. Calgary is catching up quickly on that last point. In terms of neighbourhoods, I'd say both are about equal. Edmonton has Old Strathcona, which is a very solid neighbourhood, while Calgary has the Beltline, a mix of Oliver and Old Strathcona. Beyond that, there are some differences, but a lot of similarities.
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  #38  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 11:23 PM
Yegger Yegger is offline
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Wink

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Originally Posted by MoXXon View Post
I don’t know what you mean by “neighborhood aspect”, but I do feel that both Edmonton and Calgary are underrated for their urban landscape and cultural offerings.
With Calgary though, people tend to see the extent of downtown as the commercial core and overlook the Beltline, Eau Claire, and Chinatown ext. This is understandable as it’s the most prominent area in the city, but people should consider the surrounding area’s before making sweeping assumptions that Calgary has a dead downtown after 5pm.
Sorry, I wasn't very clear. I didn't mean that Edmonton generally has better neighbourhoods, but that Edmonton's downtown proper seems to be more geared to residents than Calgary's which is very much business dominated. Most of Edmonton's parking lots seem more likely to become residential and or mixed use, whereas most of Calgary's are already office towers, or at least the office towers dominate the residential much more significantly. This is only in the downtown proper area of each city. I'd actually give Calgary the edge on the neighbourhood level for now, Edmonton's westmount and AB ave may even the score in a few years though. I don't think Edmonton has a good answer to an area like Kensington yet. Oliver has tremendous potential given the density, valley access and jasper ave into dt, but Jasper ave through Oliver is a sad stroad that could really use some help.
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  #39  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 11:35 PM
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^ Yup, it really is a shame Oliver has all that density without a major high street. There's 124th St at the edge of the neighbourhood, but I consider that mostly a Westmount road.

Edmonton does excellently with a tier 1 neighbourhood (Old Strathcona), but tier 2 is where Calgary shines (Kensington, Mission, Inglewood). Alberta Ave seems poised to become the Whyte Ave of the '90s, something akin to Inglewood, but there doesn't seem to be anything like Kensington still.
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  #40  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2014, 11:42 PM
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We also have an excellent Chinatown, Eau Claire is pretty good, and the East Village under construction, which will be unparalleled in Alberta as far as neighbourhoods go. Once it's finished of course. All of these are independent neighbourhoods not included in the CBD. The Beltline is significantly more extensive than Old Strathcona(several high streets instead of just one, and at least twice the size in area), but unfortunately most of our old theatres are on Stephen Avenue (overshadowed by our apparently corporate only CBD), Inglewood, and Kensington... with none on 17th. The large historic theatre buildings really do give Whyte Ave an awesome feel.
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