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  #81  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 2:24 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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Originally Posted by philatonian View Post
Me too! "Traditional" buildings get a bad rap by critics but if they're done with quality materials, I think they can be great. IMO the Mormon building on Vine would fit in fine on Rittenhouse Square. And I think it's great on Vine because it's setting a precedent in a neighborhood that needs one.
But when are the ever done with quality materials? That's the problem. 10 Rittenhouse is a grave example. You had a renowned architect and the most prime piece of real estate and the builders STILL could not justify using quality materials. And as I've said before, this city is graced by hundreds of genuine historic buildings and when you put up a copycat with junk materials, it stands out as a fake very easily.

Getting back on topic, are the renderings in the December articles still correct? I thought that the Qdoba building on the corner was certified historic and could not be torn down. That must affect the design in one way or another. Don't get me started on why this building is even protected!
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  #82  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 3:07 PM
Philly Fan Philly Fan is online now
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
Getting back on topic, are the renderings in the December articles still correct? I thought that the Qdoba building on the corner was certified historic and could not be torn down. That must affect the design in one way or another. Don't get me started on why this building is even protected!
I'm pretty sure that preservation of that facade has always been incorporated into the design of the building's base (and somewhat sets the tone for the overall building design). For example, see this:

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We did, however, lament the apparent fact that the two-story deco building on the corner that previously held the Qdoba would be a casualty of the project.
Today, we're happy to tell you that a rendering has surfaced online, from a poster on Philadelphia Speaks. The 25 or 26 story building is pretty good looking, and even maintains the corner property!
http://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phill...-19th-chestnut
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  #83  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 3:42 PM
UrbanRevival UrbanRevival is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
But when are the ever done with quality materials? That's the problem. 10 Rittenhouse is a grave example. You had a renowned architect and the most prime piece of real estate and the builders STILL could not justify using quality materials. And as I've said before, this city is graced by hundreds of genuine historic buildings and when you put up a copycat with junk materials, it stands out as a fake very easily. !
As noted in the General Developments thread, 10 Ritt is absolutely constructed with quality materials (PhillySkyline did a good write-up on this very topic: http://phillyskyline.com/bldgs/10rittenhouse/hardhat/).

The technique of using pre-cast paneling obviously doesn't compare to historic construction processes, and I can see how that may take away from some of the charm, but that can be said for literally every modern building in the world today. Nevertheless, this technique doesn't undercut material quality. I'm sure the exact same type of construction will be used on the new Vine Street tower, as well as this project.
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  #84  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 4:23 PM
mmikeyphilly mmikeyphilly is offline
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Glad to hear this has a shot now.

Sad however that developers have to resort to things like this to build something like this in center city.
Yeah, I was thinking the same thing 1487. I felt for sure that once the neighborhood association shot it down, that this was dead. Hmm, nice to see that Pearl still was interested in building here. After all, they had to contend with that lady with the "wind" issues. Maybe she moved, or maybe she died. You know, the weather (the gushing wind!!) has been very extreme this past winter!! Let's keep our fingers crossed that this gets built. I always liked the design, but the materials used will determine the final product.
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  #85  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 5:21 PM
jsbrook jsbrook is offline
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Originally Posted by Philly Fan View Post
I'm pretty sure that preservation of that facade has always been incorporated into the design of the building's base (and somewhat sets the tone for the overall building design). For example, see this:



http://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phill...-19th-chestnut
Certainly looks like it's incorporated, right down to the old Qboda's awnings.
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  #86  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 5:32 PM
jsbrook jsbrook is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
But when are the ever done with quality materials? That's the problem. 10 Rittenhouse is a grave example. You had a renowned architect and the most prime piece of real estate and the builders STILL could not justify using quality materials. And as I've said before, this city is graced by hundreds of genuine historic buildings and when you put up a copycat with junk materials, it stands out as a fake very easily.

Getting back on topic, are the renderings in the December articles still correct? I thought that the Qdoba building on the corner was certified historic and could not be torn down. That must affect the design in one way or another. Don't get me started on why this building is even protected!
10 Rit used quality materials. It's just dubious from a design standpoint. A bit of a Franken building, though not close to the level of Symphony House. This and the Mormon Tower look like they will be nice in a more classical style. I'd be surprised if Mormon Tower was not quality and think we have a good shot here with Pearl as well.
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  #87  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 6:02 PM
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Delete. Double post.
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  #88  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 7:42 PM
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Out of curiosity, what do you mean by "quality materials" as it pertains to 10 Rit and Symphony House? Do you mean it is not well insulated? Do you mean it will crumble in a short amount of time? Do you mean that it is falling apart and the building is just beat up now? Maybe you mean that the interiors have installed lumber liquidator flooring and Formica countertops?

I mean, of course building a new "traditional" looking building will very rarely use materials from 50-100 years ago. The materials don't make sense in modern construction. Typically they cost too much and lack in areas like insulation, fireproofing, etc. But one can capture the classic design of buildings using modern materials, and this building can easily do that using the same materials as 10 Rit.
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  #89  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 8:36 PM
apetrella802 apetrella802 is offline
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quality materials

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Originally Posted by Philly-Drew View Post
Out of curiosity, what do you mean by "quality materials" as it pertains to 10 Rit and Symphony House? Do you mean it is not well insulated? Do you mean it will crumble in a short amount of time? Do you mean that it is falling apart and the building is just beat up now? Maybe you mean that the interiors have installed lumber liquidator flooring and Formica countertops?

I mean, of course building a new "traditional" looking building will very rarely use materials from 50-100 years ago. The materials don't make sense in modern construction. Typically they cost too much and lack in areas like insulation, fireproofing, etc. But one can capture the classic design of buildings using modern materials, and this building can easily do that using the same materials as 10 Rit.
an example of a subtle difference would be the use of pre fabricated brick exterior wall panels as opposed to hand laid brick. In this case the materials are essentially the same but the end result can be different. If one examines the brick façade of 1600 Arch st, originally built for The Insurance Company of North America and now The Phoenix apts. it has the appearance of a rich tweed analogous to a Harris tweed coat. That could only be achieved by careful selection of the brick and hand laying of the brick. That type of workmanship is deemed too expensive and maybe not even appreciated today.
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  #90  
Old Posted Mar 9, 2015, 11:07 PM
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Walked by yesterday and there seems to be a fence around the parking lot on the Sansom Street side of the Boyd.
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  #91  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2015, 7:06 PM
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Demo permits up at Boyd and work has begun per Building Philly
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  #92  
Old Posted Mar 10, 2015, 7:35 PM
1487 1487 is offline
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JPC is doing the demo at 1100 market as well. Good to see this is moving forward.
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  #93  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2015, 3:28 PM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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http://planphilly.com/articles/2015/...tre-auditorium

Well it looks like the Boyd is officially gone. What a shame. When Pearl purchased the property I was cautiously optimistic. I figured restoring the Boyd would never be economically feasible on its own, but tied to a much larger project it at least seemed possible. Near residents really pushed hard to save the Boyd, and with's pearl's inability to get people on board for their skyscraper I thought that agreeing to fix up the Boyd would make everyone happy and allow them to move forward with their plans. It looks like they don't need neighborhood support to move forward though and so the Boyd is a goner.

On the plus side, Pearl apparently is going to spare the entire lobby and front facade of the Boyd, which is more than the previous ipic proposal which was only going to save the front facade. It's sad to see the Boyd go, but it will be much easier to say goodbye if this beautiful building rises next door.

My question is what actually happens to the Boyd property? My current understanding is that Pearl purchased the Boyd Property to increase the land area of their plot on the corner there, allowing them to build their tower by right. But if they plan to build as originally proposed, none of the Boyd property is involved in the footprint of the building. Would Pearl move ahead with another movie theater at this location? Has pearl ever built anything like that before? Or would they just use the movie theater lobby as a grand lobby for the proposed tower?
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  #94  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2015, 5:30 PM
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Article on the Boyd and the tower from Naked Philly
http://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phill...y-be-preserved

And another from PlanPhilly
http://planphilly.com/articles/2015/...tre-auditorium
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  #95  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2015, 5:44 PM
cafeguy cafeguy is offline
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Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
Article on the Boyd and the tower from Naked Philly
http://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phill...y-be-preserved

And another from PlanPhilly
http://planphilly.com/articles/2015/...tre-auditorium
By expanding their foot print, can they build even taller now by right?
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  #96  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2015, 6:29 PM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
Article on the Boyd and the tower from Naked Philly
http://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phill...y-be-preserved

And another from PlanPhilly
http://planphilly.com/articles/2015/...tre-auditorium


Well that answers a lot of my questions. It looks like they are going to build the tower with the same footprint as originally proposed and hopefully the same design.

But what is going to where the Boyd theater is currently located? Another movie theater with multiple screens? What will the lobby and original portion of the theater be turned into?

It is my understanding that due to the fact that the proposed tower is so tall, whatever gets built on this portion of the property can't be very tall without variances. So seems like movie theaters or some other type of short commercial use is likely. Whatever is proposed better be good, otherwise why demolish the theater, as its demolition is clearly entirely unrelated to the proposed residential tower.
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  #97  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2015, 6:52 PM
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^^^I didn't even notice that a lot of the T shaped parking lot between Chestnut and Sansom will also be taken out as well!

Nice!
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  #98  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2015, 9:05 PM
TallCoolOne TallCoolOne is offline
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This is going to look awesome. Picturing it.

[IMG]Untitled by TallCoolOne2014, on Flickr[/IMG]
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  #99  
Old Posted Mar 14, 2015, 11:41 PM
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Demolition begins on historic Boyd Theater to supporters' dismay

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20...2YvzKKPOH0e.99
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  #100  
Old Posted Mar 17, 2015, 12:32 AM
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I would assume they're building a movie theater in it's place.
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