HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #61  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 5:56 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 12,774
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trevor3 View Post
Continued spending beyond our means with our collective heads in the sand as the previous government insisted on. The Liberals are taking the brunt of everything here despite the fact that it was the last decade of PC government that put us here.

You're mad at the wrong government: Now in opposition, PCs dodge blame for role in fiscal mess

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfou...mess-1.3543213
Is spending even an option in Nfld's case? I though somebody mentioned the other week that the Province had reached its limits in terms of borrowing.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #62  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 6:04 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 12,774
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
The strike in Kuwait is apparently settled, so we'll see tomorrow if the $Cdn holds or tanks.
And both the $Cdn and the price of crude are up today. I have no idea why.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #63  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 6:13 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 15,577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trevor3 View Post
Continued spending beyond our means with our collective heads in the sand as the previous government insisted on. The Liberals are taking the brunt of everything here despite the fact that it was the last decade of PC government that put us here.

You're mad at the wrong government: Now in opposition, PCs dodge blame for role in fiscal mess

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfou...mess-1.3543213
Isn't this a bit too opinionated for CBC?

Also, that finance minister looks like she just did a monthly "supersize me" challenge at McDonald's... (I found it surprising, seems everyone's always thin in Newfoundland.)
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #64  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 6:42 PM
Vorkuta's Avatar
Vorkuta Vorkuta is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Moncton, NB
Posts: 1,133
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
There are far more progressive ways to be austere. This budget is awful. We can cut even more and do so more wisely.
What is the $ value of the tax increases? Where would you cut a corresponding value of services? I'm not being facetious here, either.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #65  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 6:50 PM
Marty_Mcfly's Avatar
Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 3,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Also, that finance minister looks like she just did a monthly "supersize me" challenge at McDonald's... (I found it surprising, seems everyone's always thin in Newfoundland.)
I'm lolling at this for two reasons.

1. Finance Minister Cathy Bennett owns a bunch of McDonald's franchises in St. John's

2. We a fat province.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #66  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:03 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 15,577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
I'm lolling at this for two reasons.

1. Finance Minister Cathy Bennett owns a bunch of McDonald's franchises in St. John's

2. We a fat province.
I knew absolutely nothing about Newfoundland before SSP (I knew they had joined Canada late, and also that some idiots in London England had ruled in favor of giving them Labrador, but that at least we managed to get some payback on the electricity generated over there in the end) so keep in mind every single thing I know has passed through a SignalHillHiker lens.

His pictures of St. John's... which I've been seeing for years now... there's rarely anyone non-thin in there!

Maybe it's a classic case of the capital being fit and thin and the "hinterlands" being overweight? My exposure to the entire province is basically my exposure to St. John's through SSP.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #67  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:12 PM
Acajack's Avatar
Acajack Acajack is online now
I used to be THAT guy
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vieux Canada
Posts: 28,214
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post

1. Finance Minister Cathy Bennett owns a bunch of McDonald's franchises in St. John's

.


You just can't make this stuff up.

Newfoundland is apparently Canada's chunkiest province. I actually thought it was NB, but they are third.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesity_in_Canada
__________________
Nowhere else but here.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #68  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:16 PM
niwell's Avatar
niwell niwell is offline
you go on ahead
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Parkdale, Toronto
Posts: 7,389
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
His pictures of St. John's... which I've been seeing for years now... there's rarely anyone non-thin in there!

Maybe it's a classic case of the capital being fit and thin and the "hinterlands" being overweight? My exposure to the entire province is basically my exposure to St. John's through SSP.

Or SHH just takes pictures of attractive people

But yes, I think that at least 90% of my Nfld knowledge comes from this forum, and most of that from one poster... not that there's anything wrong with that.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #69  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:20 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is online now
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,355
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
I knew absolutely nothing about Newfoundland before SSP (I knew they had joined Canada late, and also that some idiots in London England had ruled in favor of giving them Labrador, but that at least we managed to get some payback on the electricity generated over there in the end) so keep in mind every single thing I know has passed through a SignalHillHiker lens.

His pictures of St. John's... which I've been seeing for years now... there's rarely anyone non-thin in there!

Maybe it's a classic case of the capital being fit and thin and the "hinterlands" being overweight? My exposure to the entire province is basically my exposure to St. John's through SSP.
Ayreonaut described it best - you rarely see anyone strikingly obese here, but almost everyone is carrying around 5-15 lbs more than in most other Canadian cities.

I think the divide is mostly age. It seems once we hit our mid-40s, the climate and traditional cuisine catches up with us. Women get breasts the size of an average teenager, sprawled atop round bellies and full hips. Men stay toned from the waist down but get absolutely giant pot bellies, enough that many look as though they would actually burst if you punched them in the stomach.

This is definitely more pronounced in rural areas, but probably only because they're way older (enough to give us the oldest provincial median age in Canada, despite the fact St. John's is younger than the median Canadian age). In the city, I find it pretty average compared to other places I've lived in Canada. Ayreonaut would disagree, but he was a MUN student. They're mostly rural in origin. Plenty of attractive, fit people on George Street on any weekend night.

And yes, I definitely whip out the camera for attractive people. Or try to.

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #70  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:24 PM
Acajack's Avatar
Acajack Acajack is online now
I used to be THAT guy
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vieux Canada
Posts: 28,214
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
Ayreonaut described it best - you rarely see anyone strikingly obese here, but almost everyone is carrying around 5-15 lbs more than in most other Canadian cities.

I think the divide is mostly age. It seems once we hit our mid-40s, the climate and traditional cuisine catches up with us. Women get breasts the size of an average teenager, sprawled atop round bellies and full hips. Men stay toned from the waist down but get absolutely giant pot bellies, enough that many look as though they would actually burst if you punched them in the stomach.

This is definitely more pronounced in rural areas, but probably only because they're way older (enough to give us the oldest provincial median age in Canada, despite the fact St. John's is younger than the median Canadian age). In the city, I find it pretty average compared to other places I've lived in Canada. Ayreonaut would disagree, but he was a MUN student. They're mostly rural in origin. Plenty of attractive, fit people on George Street on any weekend night.
In terms of body size and shape, I've always found Newfoundlanders to be fairly similar to the Irish and British. Which stands to reason.

Some people might describe this as "pleasantly plump"!
__________________
Nowhere else but here.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #71  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:28 PM
Marty_Mcfly's Avatar
Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 3,076
It's almost another one of those generational divides, as plentiful as they are here. A lot of the older folk in the province have a bit of extra heft. However a lot of people my age, and younger, are average. If we'd stick around the island long enough maybe our obesity statistics would improve
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #72  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:33 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
It's almost another one of those generational divides, as plentiful as they are here. A lot of the older folk in the province have a bit of extra heft. However a lot of people my age, and younger, are average. If we'd stick around the island long enough maybe our obesity statistics would improve
I'm not sure how old you are, but in my experience here is that people here tend to expand around 21-22. In contrast to Toronto which is obviously another extreme, where by some magic people tend to stay the same weight well into their early 30s.

It seems to me that women hear especially only take as much care of themselves as they have to. Not alot of whales, but a whole lot of thick going on.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #73  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:34 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
There are far more progressive ways to be austere. This budget is awful. We can cut even more and do so more wisely.
Like how, the only answer I get is completely shafting rural.

As I've been rambling on for years now were up shit creek.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #74  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 7:37 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is online now
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vorkuta View Post
What is the $ value of the tax increases? Where would you cut a corresponding value of services? I'm not being facetious here, either.
I believe it's about 600 million or so, the increases? Not sure.

I'd design the cuts to encourage urbanization in communities of at least (or very near) 5,000 or more people. Certainly, everything cut from communities such as Corner Brook, Grand Falls-Windsor, and even Bonavista at the expense of keeping comparable services in villages of a few hundred people would be reversed. Ferries would have to recover at least 65% of their operating costs from fares, as opposed to the 1-4% that is recovered today. Communities could resettle with a vote of 50%+1. I'd keep the deficit reduction levy but design it to be more progressive. Certainly no one making $25K/year would be paying 1/3 the levy of someone making hundreds of thousands. I'd close every hospital and school in rural Newfoundland that's less than an hour from the next, and every single school with more staff than students - no matter the distance to the next. They can do distance education if need be. I'd close the Deer Lake airport. I'd cancel the widening of the Trans Labrador Highway. On and on.
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #75  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 8:25 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
I believe it's about 600 million or so, the increases? Not sure.

I'd design the cuts to encourage urbanization in communities of at least (or very near) 5,000 or more people. Certainly, everything cut from communities such as Corner Brook, Grand Falls-Windsor, and even Bonavista at the expense of keeping comparable services in villages of a few hundred people would be reversed. Ferries would have to recover at least 65% of their operating costs from fares, as opposed to the 1-4% that is recovered today. Communities could resettle with a vote of 50%+1. I'd keep the deficit reduction levy but design it to be more progressive. Certainly no one making $25K/year would be paying 1/3 the levy of someone making hundreds of thousands. I'd close every hospital and school in rural Newfoundland that's less than an hour from the next, and every single school with more staff than students - no matter the distance to the next. They can do distance education if need be. I'd close the Deer Lake airport. I'd cancel the widening of the Trans Labrador Highway. On and on.
So put 100 percent of the burden on a small fraction of the province.

What hit does st john's take (zero) what a surprise.

Ignoring the fact that is incredibly narcissisitic politics, putting the load on a small minority that are broke isn't gonna do near enough to bail out the province.

Reducing rural is hard to do, for one your definition of rural is very slippery. Bonavista is not big enough.


Things like paid relocation still cost tonnes of money, and is only suitable for a few thousand people at best.

Alot of the things your suggesting like 100 km between hospitals etc has largely already been done.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #76  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 8:28 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is online now
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,355
We're broke because they want to live in the middle of nowhere and still have access to city amenities and services. We spend more per capita on government services precisely because our rural areas are massive and want equal services as someone would get on the northeast Avalon.

Sorry, if you want to live in La Scie, then you don't get to live if you have a heart attack. That's what you sign up for.

And 5,000+ includes lots of not-St. John's communities that would keep and expand their services.

I say we keep as far down as Bonavista:



And encourage all the rest to move to one of these.
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #77  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 8:29 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 12,774
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Isn't this a bit too opinionated for CBC?

Also, that finance minister looks like she just did a monthly "supersize me" challenge at McDonald's... (I found it surprising, seems everyone's always thin in Newfoundland.)
CBC can't have political opinions? That's new.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #78  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 8:39 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
We're broke because they want to live in the middle of nowhere and still have access to city amenities and services. We spend more per capita on government services precisely because our rural areas are massive and want equal services as someone would get on the northeast Avalon.

Sorry, if you want to live in La Scie, then you don't get to live if you have a heart attack. That's what you sign up for.

And 5,000+ includes lots of not-St. John's communities that would keep and expand their services.
I agree with what your saying in the big picture, but when you zoom in at the details things don't greatly improve.

Places like La Scie are for per person very expensive.

However when you look in the total budget they do not make up this great portion that you are imagining.

i.e.

If you have 200,000 people costing you 1 dollar each.
You will have 100k(cornerbrook-grandfalls-gander etc) Costing 1.5 Each.
You have another 100k in basically the boonies of these locations costing 2.0 each.
Another 50k in regional places like st anthony etc costing 2.5
While another 30k or so costing 3 per person.
Finally you get 20k or so costing 5 per person.

Obviously these aren't the literal numbers, but you get the idea.

Removing people from that boonie category of 2.0 to st john's just makes people living in the 1.5 area worst off.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #79  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 9:54 PM
Marty_Mcfly's Avatar
Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 3,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
I believe it's about 600 million or so, the increases? Not sure.

I'd design the cuts to encourage urbanization in communities of at least (or very near) 5,000 or more people. Certainly, everything cut from communities such as Corner Brook, Grand Falls-Windsor, and even Bonavista at the expense of keeping comparable services in villages of a few hundred people would be reversed. Ferries would have to recover at least 65% of their operating costs from fares, as opposed to the 1-4% that is recovered today. Communities could resettle with a vote of 50%+1. I'd keep the deficit reduction levy but design it to be more progressive. Certainly no one making $25K/year would be paying 1/3 the levy of someone making hundreds of thousands. I'd close every hospital and school in rural Newfoundland that's less than an hour from the next, and every single school with more staff than students - no matter the distance to the next. They can do distance education if need be. I'd close the Deer Lake airport. I'd cancel the widening of the Trans Labrador Highway. On and on.
We agree on a lot of things, but some of these are probably not it. Rural NL will die on its own within the next 100 years, with the larger communities like you've mentioned sticking around. Minus the larger ones such as Corner Brook, Grand Falls, and Gander (and maybe even Clarenville), they probably won't get any more urban than they already are, it's much nicer to move to St. John's then Deer Lake. Of course, that's best case scenario when it comes to finances.

The hospital idea you have has been, for the most part, already taken place. Some government really needs to give the money to Corner Brook to get their new hospital done, we've played around with that for too long. It's sorely needed in that region. However, why should just rural NL take this burden? I don't see the reason why St. Claire's Hospital in St. John's exists. With Health Science Centre growing every day (like someone is putting lego blocks together), all services could be expanded under one roof. Same with schools: as they are now in rural NL some of them are an unfortunate drain on the government. The hand full of students and one teacher schools have got to go. However, why should a school which has say 150 students that services a region of 1000 people close because there's another school an hour away? If there were 2 of these schools 10 minutes away then yeah, sure, close and combine, but that is rarely the case. Though some of these schools do exist within St. John's.

Whenever I hear that most of rural NL should pack up and move, I always ask myself "what's so wrong with where I grew up?". It's the largest town in a collection of towns, total population of the area around 1200. There's no duplication of service in the area, we work together as a region. The fire department does get a slight government subsidy but most of their funding comes from fundraising. The doctors office is a private business, as is the pharmacy. People pay their tax, just like people in the city do. We don't require an insanely unsustainable ferry to reach us, and we live about 30 minutes away from what would be considered a "major" population centre in the region, no different than Bay Bulls to St. John's. I don't think we're what's ruining the provinces finances, so why should we be so quick to pack up and leave? Worry about communities of 20 people who are isolated and require a ferry and school and doctor first, father time will take care of the other places.

Out of curiosity, why'd you pick to close Deer Lake airport over Stephenville?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #80  
Old Posted Apr 20, 2016, 10:00 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is online now
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,355
Deer Lake airport should've never been elevated to compete with Sville.

*****

We're nothing if not petty and childish.

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:21 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.