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  #761  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2006, 3:34 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
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A thousand pardons for the 'geek' comment, but over time I note that a lot of us SSP forumers admit to 'geek' tendencies at least....who else would spend quite this much time on these matters......????

I wear it like a badge!!!! GRRRRRRR
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  #762  
Old Posted Sep 10, 2006, 9:44 PM
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More stuff about the drive for NE PA to become "Wall ST. West"...or in effect another cog in the process becoming NYC, PA......heh....oh, dear God, no....
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Posted on Sun, Sep. 10, 2006

Bridging NYC’s gap
Wall Street West initiative aims to create a secure backup system for New York’s financial district here, and prepare this region’s workforce for jobs.
By RON BARTIZEK
rbartizek@leader.net

Five years after clouds of debris billowed up from the toppled towers of the World Trade Center, a silver lining may be forming in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Government regulators are pressuring financial services firms to seek a safe and reliable backup location for data and employees, and this region’s Wall Street West initiative would seem to fit the bill perfectly.

“A lot of firms around Sept. 11 were forced to knee-jerk react,” said Christopher Haran, chief executive officer of the Great Valley Technology Alliance. When they abandoned their lower Manhattan offices and trading desks, most of them relocated not far from Wall Street, still within the theoretical “target zone” for a terrorist attack.

Because so much information and so many people were lost Sept. 11, nearly a full week passed before the stock exchanges reopened. The attacks took place on a Tuesday morning and trading did not resume until the following Monday. It took several more weeks for all the lost data to be retrieved.

The federal government doesn’t want the stock and bond markets closed for seven hours, much less seven days if there is another attack or a major natural disaster. Instead, the Securities and Exchange Commission, which regulates the markets, wants trading to resume in no more than two hours. That can’t happen unless an adequate backup – almost a parallel system – is available in a location that has not been affected.

That’s where Wall Street West comes in.

Northeastern Pennsylvania does not share the New York City region’s electrical power grid, employment base or watershed. It’s beyond range of even the most serious disruption – Haran says the blast zone for a nuclear bomb is estimated at 50 miles radius – but it’s still within relatively easy reach.

“We are far enough away, but not too far,” he said, in a pinch even within commuting distance. But there are two things missing; a fast computer connection and a trained workforce to operate the remote sites.

A diverse group of individuals and organizations is about to tackle both needs. Negotiations are underway with two telecommunications companies, one of which will get a contract to extend a fiber optic connection to the region from the New York financial district. The existing route goes through Philadelphia and the extra distance adds a tiny but unacceptable fraction to the speed of data transfers.

And if all goes as planned, during the 12-18 months it will take to lay the cable local academic leaders will formulate strategies to meet the staffing needs of new and expanding employers in the financial services industry. At the same time, Jim Ryan, newly hired as director of outreach and network development for the Wall Street West initiative, will be making a pitch to firms that could benefit from a secure backup.

He doesn’t think it will be a hard sell.

“There’s a great story to tell from a cost of living and lifestyle standpoint,” he said. “You don’t have to be real smart to see the economics of it” in low taxes and a cost of living that allows employees to afford a home much more easily than is the case in Manhattan’s suburbs.

Ryan has lived through a similar experience. The cost of living soared during the 16 years he worked at Applied Materials, a Silicon Valley semiconductor company. When it became difficult to hire workers dismayed by housing prices, the company moved 80 percent of its manufacturing to Austin. “The business case was there,” for a move, much as it is here.

Fighting perception

Chad Paul, chief executive officer of Ben Franklin Technology Partners Northeast, one of the groups promoting Wall Street West, said the economic boost for the region could be substantial.

“When you think about what potential there is to bring three or four or six of these companies to Northeastern Pennsylvania, each has the potential to employ 500 or more people,” he said.

And what starts as a backup could grow from there. “The whole idea is to attract them to the region, build the facilities and then start to move a vertical slice of their workforce.”

To get them here, Ryan will have to overcome an attitude Jim Cummings, president of Penn’s Northeast, another participating organization, has been fighting for years. “The perception that unless you were born in Manhattan, what do you know about financial services? You’re a rube.”

Carl J. Witkowski would disagree strongly. The Executive Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer of Wilkes-Barre-based Guard Insurance Group sits on a national committee of insurance executives where the conversation often turns to workforce quality. From what he hears, “I would put ours up against any. People here take pride in what they do, they work hard.”

Still, the region’s lingering negative image affects Guard in a different way. He has found that local college graduates believe there’s little opportunity here and tend to look elsewhere for work after graduation. So even though new employers might raise the ante when it comes to hiring, Witkowski and Guard are solidly behind Wall Street West.

“It would be more jobs, a larger talent pool. It’s one of those things where success breeds success.”

A slow response

Despite the disruptions of Sept. 11 and a major power outage two years later, a paper issued in 2005 by federal agencies that oversee the financial services industry found inadequate response to the call for remote backup and recovery facilities. Even more fundamental questions have been raised about the wisdom of having the nation’s financial services concentrated in a small area; 74 percent of the civilians killed at the World Trade Center worked in the industry.

Yet most firms that moved some offices out of the city went only across the Hudson or to nearby Long Island. “They did exactly what the feds didn’t want them to do,” Cummings said.

“It doesn’t seem like they’ve adopted the mindset,” that they need to be farther from New York. “That I think is our biggest challenge.”

Or it may be that the firms have been thinking too far out of the box. Witkowski said there was a belief in the industry that backup offices needed to be farther away, perhaps in the Midwest. That would be fine for disaster recovery, which using modern technology can be conducted almost anywhere.

“But it’s one thing to restore systems, it’s another to deploy and harness your people resources,” he said. “That’s why Northeastern Pennsylvania is so appealing to many people.”

Witkowski sees one other possible obstacle in the path of Wall Street West, and it’s closer to home.

“The biggest challenge is to accept this and to capitalize on the opportunity. One of the things that will allow this to succeed is collaboration at a regional level.” But that hasn’t always been the case, with different regions and educational institutions competing rather than cooperating.

That may be a thing of the past; the Wall Street West initiative covers nine counties, more than a dozen colleges, business interests and a wide range of economic development organizations. The result of the effort could be dramatic.

“It becomes a magnet. If you build that fiber backbone and infrastructure it really fuels the local area. And it will grow,” Witkowski said.

Congressman Paul Kanjorski sees Wall Street West as only the dawn of a new era for the region.

“In reality, when you look at Northeastern Pennsylvania, it’s probably the most ideal expansion of greater New York,” he said. That westward movement already is happening in Monroe County and will continue, he believes. “They really don’t have much option” to expand in other directions.

But improved education and training are needed to keep the trend moving, Kanjorski said.

“They really have to have an upscaled workforce to meet their needs. We’re not competing for back office, we’re competing for very highly skilled positions.”

“It really can’t be looked at as year or two- or three-year program. It’s decades.”

-------------------------------
© 2006 Times Leader and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.timesleader.com
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  #763  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2006, 1:00 AM
donybrx donybrx is offline
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Some jobs soon available at Moehgan Sun 'racino? Tribe's application for slots will be among first to be heard by PA beginning Monday..........
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Posted on Sat, Sep. 09, 2006

Many slots to fill at Mohegan
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs will have a career fair at Wachovia Arena on Tuesday and Wednesday.

By JERRY LYNOTT jlynott@leader.net

PLAINS TWP. – Hiring plans are back on track for Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, which is looking to fill hundreds of spots for its coming round-the-clock slots casino operation.

A career fair for prospective employees will be held on Tuesday and Wednesday at the Wachovia Arena in Wilkes-Barre Township. The fair runs from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. each day.

Jim Wise, vice president of marketing, said the arena was booked to accommodate an expected large turnout.

“We’re thinking in the thousands because we’ve had that much interest so far,” Wise said Friday.

Between 350 and 400 full-time positions will be filled in a variety of departments from food and beverage, to information technology, security and finance.

Wise said he was unable to give a starting date because the casino has yet to be licensed.

Beginning Monday, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board will have hearings on granting conditional Category 1 licenses for slot machine gambling. Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs will be the first of six applicants scheduled to appear before the board.

“We’re hoping to hear by Sept. 28,” Wise said, referring to the anticipated approval by the gaming control board.

Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs is going ahead with the hiring and licensing on parallel tracks in order to be ready to operate as soon as possible. Wise estimated the workers could be on the job by December. Employees will undergo training and licensing before they can work, he added. “There are some steps to be completed.”

Job seekers must bring resumes to the fair. They will be able to visit booths and speak with Mohegan representatives from different departments.

“We’re looking for energetic, enthusiastic people who have a passion for guest service and want to work in a great environment,” Robert Soper, president and chief executive officer of Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs, said in a prepared statement.

Last month Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs stepped up work on a temporary casino designed to house 1,100 slot machines. A 400,000-square-foot permanent facility will hold 2,000 slot machines, bars, restaurants and retail space.

Two job fairs scheduled in June were canceled pending resolution of a tax issue with the state.

In a deal worked out with the previous owner, Penn National Gaming agreed to refund $30 million of the $280 million selling price. Luzerne County also pledged assistance to Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs in applying for up to $15 million in economic development grants.

With those arrangements in hand, Mohegan accepted annual local tax burden of $10 million. Of the total $2.2 million goes to host municipality Plains Township and the other $7.8 million into an account controlled by the state Department of Community and Economic Development for projects in the county.

Overall, the authorized 14 gaming facilities in Pennsylvania will pay at least 55 percent of their slots winnings in state, county and local taxes and fees.

Jobs to be filled

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Find out what jobs are available by visiting www.mohegansunpocono.com and click on employment.


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Jerry Lynott, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 829-7237.
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  #764  
Old Posted Sep 11, 2006, 11:57 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
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Another building block for DT WIlkes-Barre, a second bookstore in a renovated 100 year old building......sweet news.....

09/11/2006
Investor’s project includes bookstore
BY DENISE ALLABAUGH
STAFF WRITER


WILKES-BARRE — Jim Casey has invested more than $500,000 in downtown Wilkes-Barre.

Casey plans to renovate a 100-year-old downtown building which First United Methodist Church will use to open a bookstore on the first floor.

The building, located at 92 S. Main St., was the former Mike’s Library. It was severely damaged in a fire in January of 2004.

Casey, a Wilkes-Barre resident who has renovated about 50 city properties, bought the building from Bill Isaac for $10,000 and spent the last two years restoring it.

He expanded the first floor by 2,000 square feet and raised the ceilings for the used bookstore, which will be called “The Book Concern.” It is set to open in about 10 days.

The Rev. Dr. Keith Benjamin, pastor of First United Methodist Church, said the used bookstore will employ about 16 people who have difficulties finding or holding employment. They suffer from depression, post-traumatic stress disorder or other emotional issues.

“We are trying to create a positive, uplifting work environment so these people will be excited about coming to work,” Benjamin said. “Our goal is to work with people who have problems.”

The used bookstore will contain about 26,000 volumes, which were donated, Benjamin said. It will be a much different type of bookstore than the college bookstore planned in the Innovation Center on the first block of South Main Street, he said.

“They’re not competition. There is synergy,” Benjamin said. “Since this facility was used as a used bookstore in the past, it is good to continue the tradition.”

Upstairs, Casey created three spacious, New-York style loft apartments with red brick walls, skylights and bay windows which display “I believe” signs.

A clear view of the new $31 million movie theater can be seen from the porches. Many people have expressed interest in renting the apartments, he said.

The price per month will depend on who makes the best offer, Casey said.

“Let’s just say I will take the most I can get,” Casey said. “I talked to tons of people who are interested, but I’d love to talk to more.”

Casey called the project “the most unique space in Wilkes-Barre.” He challenged CityVest, the Greater Wilkes-Barre of Chamber of Business and Industry and other developers to build the same quality loft-style apartments that he completed.

Casey proudly displayed an upstairs apartment with 16 bay windows, three skylights, oak hardwood floors and a fireplace. Parking is available behind the building, he said. The 28 loft-style apartments planned for the theater have only one window in each, he said.

“This should be the minimum. We should do no less than this,” Casey said. “We need to have more room for professionals. Obviously, it will be a little pricey.”

dallabaugh@citizensvoice.com
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  #765  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2006, 12:21 AM
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Wow, another project in a NE PA downtown. Will it ever end?
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  #766  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2006, 9:19 PM
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^^^^^ HAH! We're just gittin' started. really.

I 'd be happy to see even a series of smaller projects on a continuing basis after those years of decline.....but a couiple of big jobs would be sweet now that the theater thing is up/running or rather showing...

Meanwhilst, up at the Downs, it is full trot for Mohegan licensure this very month:

09/12/2006
Mohegan Sun fares well at board hearing
BY MICHAEL RACE
HARRISBURG BUREAU CHIEF


HARRISBURG — Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board staff say they have not found any issues that might prevent Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs from being awarded a conditional slots license later this month.

That disclosure capped a two-hour hearing Monday during which Mohegan Sun officials outlined their vision for the Plains Township track and fielded questions from board members about issues ranging from tribal sovereignty to no-smoking policies.

If the gaming board awards Pocono Downs a conditional slots license on Sept. 27, the Plains Township track could have a slots parlor open by year’s end, making it the first in the state to offer casino-style gambling.

Monday’s hearing drew none of the anti-gambling protesters who have been fixtures at some gaming board meetings, but it did draw the interest of one potential competitor to Pocono Downs.

Dunmore businessman Louis DeNaples, who hopes to land a slots license for his Mount Airy Lodge in Monroe County’s Paradise Township, decided to sit in on the hearing to get a sense of how other applicants are making their pitches to the board.

“It’s all about homework,” he said of his visit.

Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority Chairman Bruce Bozsum said the goal is to establish “a clean, safe and first-class operation” that would “blow away the customer.”

Pocono Downs plans to start off with about 1,080 slots when it opens the first phase of its expansion project later this year. It eventually plans to expand to a 400,000-square-foot facility that offers 2,000 slots, a nightclub, restaurants, retail shops and child care facilities.

Gaming board staff reportedly spent more than 2,000 hours probing the finances and business practices of Mohegan Sun, investigating dozens of officials within the organization. The agency has more than 22 boxes of records, most of which have not been made public.

Three gaming officials in charge of enforcement, licensing and corporate compliance each gave Mohegan Sun a clean bill of health Monday, telling the board they found no issues that would preclude awarding a conditional slots license.

The only issue that caused some concern among the board was the Mohegan Tribe’s unique status among slots applicants as a sovereign entity, which could limit state agencies from dictating how its casino can be run.

Board member Mary DiGiacomo Colins asked Mohegan officials if they would be willing to waive sovereign immunity and “submit” to oversight from the gaming board and other state agencies like the Liquor Control Board and State Police.

Michael Ciaccio, general counsel for the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority, said waiver of sovereignty already is done on a “limited” basis to work with state agencies, a policy they planned to continue.

After the hearing, Mr. Ciaccio dismissed the matter as a “nonissue,” noting the tribe already has resolved sovereignty concerns with the state’s Harness Racing Commission.

Contact the writer: mrace@timesshamrock.com
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  #767  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2006, 7:39 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
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Good Golly......7,000 showed up at the Mohegan racino job fair...for 400 jobs...


09/14/2006
Thousands vie for jobs at Mohegan Sun fair
STAFF REPORT


The Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs job fair was supposed to end at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, but an hour after that more than a hundred people were still snaked throughout the floor, waiting to turn in applications.
About 7,000 people came to the job fair, held Tuesday and Wednesday at Wachovia Arena at Casey Plaza. The majority — about 4,200 people — showed up on Wednesday, with lines creeping out the doors at times.

More than 400 jobs are at stake as the casino finishes phase one of its plan to put in 1,080 slots at the location by the end of the year.

“We’re very pleased,” said Robert Soper, president and chief executive officer of Mohegan. “There have been a lot of talented applicants.”

Soper said applicants should hear back within the next two weeks about further interviews and training.

“The difficult thing is when 7,000 people show up, 1,200 turn in applicants and there’s only 400 jobs,” he said.
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  #768  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2006, 7:42 PM
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anyone know when the connell building project starts?
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  #769  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2006, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Snakeyes
anyone know when the connell building project starts?
Sorry, Snakeyes, I don't have any idea.....I'd be interested in knowing too or any thing about other Scranton projects....is here a websie similar to Wilkes-Barre's Chamber/ Diamond City partnership site that gives info?
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  #770  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2006, 4:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snakeyes
anyone know when the connell building project starts?
I try to monitor all these developments and except for the intial announcement, I haven't seen nor heard anything about the Connell Building getting started.

You could build seven Empire State Buildings in the time it takes to get a new project going in Scranton, unfortunately.
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  #771  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2006, 4:18 AM
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THE YANKEES ARE COMING! THE YANKEES ARE COMING!

See my thread concerning the reported move of the Yankees AAA team to Scranton.

While I'm not a big fan of the Bronx Bombers, this is amazing news for the region. Tickets are most definitely going to be hard to come by, and those empty upper deck seats will be a memory. Good for the team, good for the region!
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  #772  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2006, 10:40 PM
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Wilkes University development: school lands prominent publisher:

Wilkes is evolving very nicely these days.....becoming academically, programmatically impressive after much effort and planning..

Etruscan Press to relocate to Wilkes University
Publishers aim for link with Creative Writing MA program
Kristin Kile
Posted: 1/30/06
The Masters of Arts in Creative Writing program has only been in existence for a year, but already has made strides in becoming nationally recognized. One of those strides now includes a publishing company to be housed at Wilkes.

Dr. Bonnie Culver, Director of the Masters of Arts in Creative Writing, announced at the Maslow Foundation Salon Reading Series on January 12, that Etruscan Press is set to move its operation to Wilkes University June 1. The announcement was exciting news for both undergraduate and graduate students in the program.

Robert Mooney and Philip Brady, who are faculty in the creative writing program, are the founders Etruscan Press. Their involvement with the program is what led them to tap Wilkes University as the new home base for their publishing operation.

"They like Wilkes University a good bit and they like the way the administration treated the faculty and the program. We've had great support at all levels, and they felt this would be a good place for their press to be," Culver said.

Jim Warner, program assistant with the MA in Creative Writing said every good masters program has a press at its institution. Now Wilkes will be right in step with others of its ilk.

"What they (Etruscan publishers) liked was the fact that we're establishing a community, a real serious community of writers and artists here at Wilkes and they saw that commitment, I think, with our program, with our students and our work ethic, and they wanted to be a part of it," Warner said.

Etruscan is currently at Youngstown State University in Ohio. According to its website, Etruscan is a "nonprofit cooperative of poets and writers working to produce and promote books that nurture the dialogue among genres, achieve a distinctive voice, and reshape the literary and cultural histories of which we are a part."

The press does not seek submissions; rather, the publishers make requests. Etruscan has published books by H.L Hix, a well-known poet and critic, Milton Kessler and William Heyen, whose book, Shoal Train, was nominated in 2005 for a National Book Award in poetry.

"They do...high end, by-request-only kinds of books. So they have [established] a very good reputation in a short time," Culver said.

The press will link its operation with the MA program, which will soon be moving out of Kirby Hall where it currently resides in the English department, into its own space. Culver said The Manuscript will also move with the MA program. To date, no specific new location has been named for the program and Etruscan Press.

Culver noted that the press will be beneficial to both undergraduates and graduates because they will be able to see how a press works firsthand.

The press will also hire a Managing Editor as well as a graduate assistant. The interviewing process for the Managing Editor position will begin in March. Culver said the space Etruscan will require will mainly consist of boxes of its inventory.

Culver said that with the move to Wilkes, Etruscan is helping to build a national visibility for the MA program as well as increase its own reputation and credibility. "...Anytime a book is published, it will have the Wilkes logo on it, so it will help increase our national reputation in writing, which the MA is doing as well," Culver said.

Wilkes already has some noteworthy characteristics related to the MA program that are garnering national attention including: the James Jones First Novel Fellowship, which uses MA and undergraduates as readers; and Letters About Literature which is the Library of Congress book reading program.

"We're forming a nice little nucleus," Culver said. "So it's really all of those things that made Etruscan feel it that this was a good place to be for writing, because there's a good bit happening already here. We're building a national presence to all of those pieces together."

University Provost Maravene Loeschke, has been involved with moving Etruscan Press to the University by offering support during the transition period.

"I am pleased that we are able to engage in this partnership with this exciting, new press that already has earned a solid reputation. The partnership is an enrichment to our Masters in Creative Writing [program] and an asset to our Wilkes academic community," Loeschke said.
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© Copyright 2006 The Beacon
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  #773  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2006, 12:32 AM
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It's hard to imagine Fifth Ave. without Lord & Taylor, but according to this analysis... meantime. W-B's facility wouldn't remain vacant for long...it's one of the hottest locations in NE PA.....

09/14/2006
Analyst: Lord & Taylor in dire straits
BY DAVID FALCHEK
STAFF WRITER


The Lord & Taylor distribution center in Wilkes-Barre Township and its 220 employees will be in limbo for a few years, and probably not long for this world, a major retail analyst said Wednesday.
Federated Department Stores Inc.’s pending $1.2 billion sale of the Lord & Taylor retail chain to NRDC Equity Partners, a real estate company that specializes in liquidating struggling stores, could foreshadow the end of one of America’s oldest department store chains and a key employer in the township.

A retail analyst says it’s time to administer Last Rites to the 41-store chain.

“Ultimately, there will be no Lord & Taylor,” said Howard Davidowitz, chairman of Davidowitz & Associates Inc., national retail consultant in New York City. “No one will buy it as a retail entity because, as a store, it can’t make money.”

Purchase, N.Y.-based NRDC wants Lord & Taylor’s real estate. The flagship Fifth Avenue store in Manhattan is worth hundreds of millions in building and land. The air rights above the building are worth another several hundred million dollars, Davidowitz said. The chain has more than a dozen other stores in valuable urban locations.

“This is a real estate deal to them, not a retail deal,” he said. Liquidation could take up to five years, he said.

Federated officials don’t know, or won’t say, what NRDC’s plans are after the Lord & Taylor transaction scheduled for this fall.

“We are selling it to them,” said Federated spokesman Jim Slususki. “What they do with it is their own business.”

Attempts to reach NRDC officials were not successful.

Earlier this year NRDC purchased struggling Linens ‘n Things. For such floundering retailers, their only marketable asset is the real estate beneath them and space they occupy.

“Linens ‘n Things, Sears, Kmart — those were all real-estate deals,” Davidowitz said. “Linens ‘n Things is a cadaver; and Bed, Bath & Beyond is eating their brains.”

In 1992, the Lord & Taylor distribution center was one of the first developments at Highland Park, a former strip mine and dump reclaimed by the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry, which originally envisioned the site as a business park.

With a modern building, high demand for distribution space, and on-the-interstate location, the building probably wouldn’t be vacant for long if the high-end retailer goes belly-up, local economic developers say.

Many companies scout the area looking for locations or buildings for distribution, said James Cummings of Penn’s Northeast, a regional economic marketing group.

“We get a steady stream of requests for buildings like that,” he said. “It would have tremendous appeal.”

Wilkes-Barre chamber Vice President Larry Newman said he believes NRDC will continue the Lord & Taylor brand. But no matter what, the distribution center will remain a productive property, he said.

“Sixty acres of land adjoining an interstate exit wouldn’t stay available for long,” he said.

dfalchek@timesshamrock.com
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  #774  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2006, 7:21 PM
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Well, I'm back home. Had a great afternoon with MetroJ. Thanks for showing me around town Bruce. I'm still amazed by the Masonic Temple building. Good to see the old "Oral" school too. Hope we can get more NE PA folks to join us next time.
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  #775  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2006, 4:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Ex-Ithacan
Well, I'm back home. Had a great afternoon with MetroJ. Thanks for showing me around town Bruce. I'm still amazed by the Masonic Temple building. Good to see the old "Oral" school too. Hope we can get more NE PA folks to join us next time.
Hey Ex-Ith...Glad to be your tour guide in Scranton. Had an awesome time. Especially enjoyed cooling off in the coffeehouse and chatting.
I'm happy I decided to take you through the Scranton Cultural Center/Masonic Temple. It is indeed an impressive structure...found out it was designed by prominent 20s-30s architect Raymond Hood, btw.

So...hear that Dony, Vasily, etc.? A good time was had by all (well, both), so hopefully we can hold a future Scranton micro-mini meet and y'all can share in the wealth. Maybe I'll even toss in a few Coney Island hot dogs next time.

I will post the pics soon to SSP.
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  #776  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2006, 5:03 PM
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Glad you guys met up and had a good time.....I'd be around more if I lived nearer (not 6+ hours away) and would be happy to take you both the ABE's hot dogs in W_B for lunch and mebbe Stookey's BarB Q in West Nanticoke for a 'pork wet' and chocolate milk for dinner......

Raymond Hood designed Radio City Music Hall...... in a very different style form Scranton Cultural Center/Masonic Temple....I also like Covenant Presbyterian Curch among many other Scranton notables....
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  #777  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2006, 11:36 PM
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tell me about... this "pork wet"
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  #778  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2006, 12:20 AM
donybrx donybrx is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evergrey
tell me about... this "pork wet"
okay, with pleasure.....since you seem to be a fellow gourmand......

Stookey's BarB Q, Rte. 11 West Nanticoke PA. Private family recipe, 1940's plain little place.....meat smoked in apple wood----pork, beef, ham or turkey. I only eat the pork...shredded and in a clear (not tomato based) Barbeque sauce, a little bitey..just right, no overwhelming smoke flavor like many others...seved with relish on a perfect sandwich roll (it should be theirs). I order mine 'wet' so that there's enough sauce to dampen the bun a bit......I kid you not...this is nirvana for me......with two small chocolate milks, natch..and wise potato chips, since they don't have UTZ in small bags....

PS: they sell the meat frozen and ship it overnight, too......I tend to wait til I get back there to have the whole, distinctly Pennsylvania experience...
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  #779  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2006, 8:26 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
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DT WIlkes-Barre owes much to the beautiful Kirby Center and to Al Boscov who provided capital and urgency 20 years ago into getting the Kirby renovated, up and running! Bravo....a job masterfully done!

Our opinion ....(Wilkes-Barre TIMES LEADER)
Kirby Center still shining crown jewel for the area


THE F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts is a local institution. After 20 years of hosting presidents, graduations, social events, entertainment shows too numerous to mention – even a cattle show -- the center remains an integral part of downtown Wilkes-Barre.

It weathered Wilkes-Barre’s recent worst of times. It’s here for the renaissance. It’s hard to imagine life without it.

But the Kirby Center wasn’t always on Public Square, a proud and shining edifice that residents could point to, even when the rest of the view wasn’t so bright. Before the Kirby Center, that spot on Public Square was a shabby, run-down, shuttered movie theater. What had opened as the Comerford Theater in 1938 – the largest and most elaborate theater in Luzerne County – was transformed into the Paramount and then slid into decline, limited use and disrepair. It was closed and threatened with demolition when someone with tenacity, vision and the ability to bring people and resources together changed the landscape of downtown Wilkes-Barre.

That was Albert Boscov, who a few years before transformed the Boston Store on South Main Street into one of his largest department stores. Boscov brought his enthusiasm to the Kirby Center. He shared his energy and dream with residents of the area and brought the community together.

Twenty years later, the theater boasts a legacy of being an anchor for entertainment of all kinds to not only Wilkes-Barre but also the Wyoming Valley and Luzerne County.

Prior to the opening of the Kirby Center there were occasional concerts at the Irem Temple on North Franklin Street, at college gymnasiums, nightclubs and hotel ballrooms, but the Kirby Center took us to a new level of what to expect on stage and on Public Square.

The Kirby Center put a shine on downtown that continues today. It set a standard for what this community can achieve when we work together. That’s what the Kirby Center did – what Al Boscov did -- when there theater opened 20 years ago today.

Happy anniversary, to all of us.
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  #780  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2006, 4:38 AM
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MetroJunkie BJR MetroJunkie BJR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donybrx
okay, with pleasure.....since you seem to be a fellow gourmand......

Stookey's BarB Q, Rte. 11 West Nanticoke PA. Private family recipe, 1940's plain little place.....meat smoked in apple wood----pork, beef, ham or turkey. I only eat the pork...shredded and in a clear (not tomato based) Barbeque sauce, a little bitey..just right, no overwhelming smoke flavor like many others...seved with relish on a perfect sandwich roll (it should be theirs). I order mine 'wet' so that there's enough sauce to dampen the bun a bit......I kid you not...this is nirvana for me......with two small chocolate milks, natch..and wise potato chips, since they don't have UTZ in small bags....

PS: they sell the meat frozen and ship it overnight, too......I tend to wait til I get back there to have the whole, distinctly Pennsylvania experience...
Sounds great! I can live on food like that. Wait, I actually do. At least by buying Wise chips, you are supporting a local NEPA business. Wise's HQ is in Berwick, just a hop, skip and jump down Rt 11.

Utz, Schmutz...they are overrated.

I love "barbeques" (as we call them up in Scranton)...pork, beef, ham, you name it.
"Pork wet" must be one of those Luzerne County things...
(the Lackawanna/Luzerne Mason-Dixon Line rears its ugly head once again)
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