HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Northeast

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1021  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2007, 2:22 AM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
Death of a notable local sports figure from a while back:

<<Back


NFL Ref Lou Palazzi Dies

Tuesday, January 9, 8:39 a.m.
By Jim Hamill

Funeral services will be held Wednesday for a Lackawanna County man who made a name for himself in the National Football League.

Lou Palazzi of Dunmore passed away Sunday at the age of 85.

The year was 1958 and Palazzi was in the middle of what's been called the greatest NFL game ever played.

He refereed the NFL championship game between the Baltimore Colts and the New York Giants. As a highly-respected official, Palazzi built a career on judgement calls, and tough ones at that.

"He threw Jimmy Brown out of a game. And you'd think Brown would hold against him. But he didn't. He respected my father," remembered his son Lou Palazzi, Jr.

At his home in Newfoundland, Wayne County, Palazzi's son is surrounded by memories of his dad, photos of a Penn State captain and a family man. The younger Palazzi remembers a man who did it all.

"He was great father figure in a traditional football family. He loved playing it, more than anything, officiating too."

Lou Palazzi's career spanned decades and not only can it be measured by NFL standards, but by the impact he had in his own hometown, in Dunmore.

Dunmore football coach Jack Henzes said Palazzi will be sorely missed. He said Lou was from the old school and helped him adjust to his role in the community.

"He pulled me aside and told me about the community of Dunmore and was all positive. It helped me tremendously in teaching and coaching at Dunmore High School."

Lou Palazzi played for the Dunmore Bucks and the Penn State Nittany Lions. After world war II, he played two seasons for the New York Giants, then put on the stripes for 30 years.

"He did his job very well. And had a great rapport other officials and coaches the NFL. They loved him and for him to be in three Super Bowls, he had a great reputation."

Incidentally other notable local natives are Sen. Joe Biden, Jane Jacobs, NY award winning set designer Santo Loquasto, actors Lee J. Cobb, Edie Adams (widow of Ernie Kovacs), Nick Adams, Jack Palance, Lisbeth Scott........

Last edited by donybrx; Jan 10, 2007 at 2:27 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1022  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2007, 1:37 AM
Ex-Ithacan's Avatar
Ex-Ithacan Ex-Ithacan is offline
Old Fart Forumer
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Live in DC suburbs-Maryland
Posts: 21,463
That's a shame he passed. As far as famous NE PA folks, don't forget Hall of Fame (Cooperstown) Major league baseball umpire Nestor Chylak from Olyphant.
__________________
Get off my lawn you whippersnappers!!!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1023  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2007, 1:46 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ex-Ithacan View Post
That's a shame he passed. As far as famous NE PA folks, don't forget Hall of Fame (Cooperstown) Major league baseball umpire Nestor Chylak from Olyphant.
Silly me...how could I have forgotten...is my face red or what?

Who?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1024  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2007, 2:37 PM
Ex-Ithacan's Avatar
Ex-Ithacan Ex-Ithacan is offline
Old Fart Forumer
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Live in DC suburbs-Maryland
Posts: 21,463
^ I just know of him cause my Dad knew him.
__________________
Get off my lawn you whippersnappers!!!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1025  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2007, 2:12 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
RE: The Huber Coal breaker situation at Wilkes-Barre (Ashley). Below is a fuller account from the AP via the Philadelphia Inquirer.

I knew that this was the last of its kind in the area, but didn't realize that it's among the last in the nation. Maybe it shold be a ntaional historic site, qualifying it for Fed funding...
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted on Fri, Jan. 12, 2007

A relic of King Coal is at risk
Efforts to save one of the last anthracite breakers seem to be failing.
By Michael Rubinkam
Associated Press

ASHLEY, Pa. - One of the last great relics of coal mining in Northeastern Pennsylvania may be dismantled and sold for scrap - or preserved as a monument to a bygone industry.

Either way, the owner of the Huber Breaker - a huge, hulking, boxy steel-and-glass structure once used to crush, wash and sort anthracite coal - is determined that its fate be decided soon.

"It's just coming to a point where something's got to be done, now," Al Roman said in an interview at his office near the Huber. "It has to become a museum or it has to be torn down. We can't continue to pay insurance on a structure like this."

The 68-year-old Huber Breaker, one of the last remaining anthracite breakers in the United States, has deteriorated badly since its closure in 1976.

Roman, president of No. 1 Contracting Corp., a heavy-construction company, bought the breaker in 1997 for $25,000. He pledged six years ago to donate it for historic preservation, but negotiations, which have intensified in recent weeks, have yet to bear fruit.

Hundreds of breakers that once dotted the mountain landscape have disappeared. In the 1800s and early 1900s, these structures processed virtually all the nation's anthracite, providing fuel for the Industrial Revolution and heat for cities and towns up and down the Eastern Seaboard.

Working in the breakers was a dirty, dangerous job; many workers were killed or maimed by the giant machinery or died from black lung disease. Boys hired to pick rock and slate from the coal worked long hours in horrendous conditions.

Walt Zimski, 68, of Wapwallopen, has vivid memories of working at the Huber Breaker in the early 1960s. His jobs there included operating coal cars, picking slate, and breaking up large chunks of coal with a sledgehammer.

"I stood at the top [of the Huber] and that god-danged thing would be shaking," said Zimski.

Zimski said he would like to see the Huber preserved. "I was a part of history and didn't even know it," he said.

Roman, too, said he wants the breaker turned into a museum. But salvagers are offering him hundreds of thousands of dollars for the breaker's high-grade steel, and Roman longs to be rid of what has become a gigantic liability.

So, on Nov. 27, he wrote a letter that received widespread publicity - and sparked a flurry of activity between Roman and local and state government officials seeking the breaker's preservation.

Writing that "steel is at an all-time high," Roman gave the Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority, the agency with which he had been negotiating, 10 days to agree to his terms: the breaker property in exchange for 21 acres of nearby authority-owned land. The authority, to that point, had offered Roman only six acres.

Allen Bellas, executive director of the redevelopment authority, said in an interview that the land requested by Roman is part of an 80-acre former rail yard the authority intends to develop as an industrial park.

Even if the authority wanted to part with the 21 acres, he said, it wouldn't be easy: The entire 80-acre tract is collateral for a loan the agency took out for site cleanup.

Bellas said a more promising solution is a cash buyout. Two members of the authority's board broached the idea to Roman last month.

Roman, however, said he is dubious that any government agency would be able to come up with the kind of money he has been offered to sell the breaker for scrap. He maintains that a land swap is the cheapest way out of the stalemate.

Some people have accused Roman of trying extort the public, but he said he is not motivated by money. "We're going to lose money no matter how we do this. Everybody thinks we're trying to hold people up for money. That's not the case," said Roman, an engineer whose company, which he started in 1959, builds bridges, roads and other public works.

Luzerne County Commissioner Greg Skrepenak, whose grandfather died in an accident at the Huber, said that if Roman and the redevelopment authority don't reach an agreement, he might seek to have the breaker condemned. That is a legal process by which the government can seize private property for the public's benefit, paying fair market value to the owner.

"I think at the end of the day, everyone pretty much wants the same thing," Skrepenak said. "I think there's going to be a resolution soon."

Although Roman and the redevelopment authority are seemingly at loggerheads despite weeks of discussions, many involved in the effort to save the Huber nevertheless say they are more optimistic than ever.

The Huber Breaker Preservation Society, a nonprofit group working with Roman and the redevelopment authority, is sitting on about $250,000 in grant money to replace windows and refurbish signage. Bill Best, the group's president, said he believes there will be a favorable outcome, and soon.

"It's never been this close for the dream to become a reality," he said.

The Huber Breaker

It was named in honor of Charles F. Huber, chairman of Glen Alden Coal Co.

Constructed of steel and glass, it replaced a wooden breaker from 1895.

It produced 7,000 tons of coal per day and employed 1,700 workers.

It houseda series of mechanical devices that sized and washed coal.

Coal processed at Huber Breaker was sprayed with a blue chemical and marketed as "Blue Coal."

The coal was delivered by rail to East Coast markets.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOURCES: Huber Breaker Preservation Society, Historic American Engineering Record, AP

© 2007 Philadelphia Inquirer and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.philly.com
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1026  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2007, 3:53 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
Work to begin on WB's Intermodal Transportation Center:

01/13/2007
Foundation work expected to begin Monday on transportation center
BY JAMES CONMY
STAFF WRITER


WILKES-BARRE — City officials acquired a $450,000 piece of land Friday needed for construction to begin on the long-awaited $18 million downtown transportation center.

The project will create a 752-space parking garage and also allow Luzerne County Transportation Authority buses to serve passengers off Public Square. The transaction with 65 Public Square Associates was based on independent appraisals, said Marie McCormick, deputy city administrator.

The half-acre parcel is used for parking. It is “nestled” behind the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry building, the Wilkes-Barre Center and Provincial Towers, McCormick said.

Crews will begin preparing the site for foundation work Monday. Preliminary work will include grading and locating utilities, Mayor Tom Leighton said Friday. “It’s exciting to see such a viable project moving forward,” he said. “It will change the scope of downtown. It will get the buses off the Square and allow us to add parking on (Public) Square and around South Main Street, which will improve the marketability of the retail stores and restaurants.”

The deed transferring the parcel identifies Jeffrey Pyros as managing partner of 65 Public Square Associates. He could not be reached for comment Friday.

The city still needs to acquire a “few” more parcels to complete the project, said city Solicitor Bill Vinsko, who finalized the 65 Public Square Associates purchase.

“We’re very close to completing agreements for the remaining parcels,” Vinsko said. “Negotiations are ongoing and we hope to have everything wrapped up shortly.”

Of the $18 million cost, $11 million is funded by the Federal Transit Administration and $1 million by the Economic Development Administration. State funding covers $3 million and the last $3 million is coming from a loan the city took out for the project.

jconmy@citizensvoice.com
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1027  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2007, 4:28 PM
Ex-Ithacan's Avatar
Ex-Ithacan Ex-Ithacan is offline
Old Fart Forumer
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Live in DC suburbs-Maryland
Posts: 21,463
With so much going on in downtown W-B, I wish I'd made an investment there a few years back. I might be able to retire some day if I had.

I agree the Huber breaker should be a national historic site. So many people had to work in places like that just to survive in an era of much less government help. I think it would be a legacy of their struggles.
__________________
Get off my lawn you whippersnappers!!!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1028  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 2:44 AM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
^^Looks like an uphill battle, unfortunately......need some passion about it....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1029  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2007, 9:04 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
Once again...skiing in Scranton.....Montage re-opens as Sno Mountain...21 trails!

Sno Mountain Opens

Friday, January 12, 12:30 p.m.
By Ryan Leckey

Now that it's feeling more like January area ski resorts are relishing in the chilly temperatures and covering slopes with snow.

Sno Mountain in Scranton, formerly Montage Mountain, finally opened for the season Friday. Managers say people can expect to see big changes before they even take to the trails.

All systems are finally a go at Sno Mountain. The resort opened for the season after warm weather postponed its original date back in December.

Many are excited the mountain is ready. Nicholas Debari picked up his season pass Friday morning. "Thank God there's snow. Finally," he said.

Some of the upgrades the new owners made include making season passes and lift tickets high tech. Each include a micro chip.

"Inside that micro chip contains your lift ticket, your lesson and your rental. Each of our lift attendants have a scanner and they'll scan it and be able to tell whether or not your lift ticket is valid for that day," explained Judy Kraynak of Sno Mountain.

Other upgrades include changes inside the lodge. There's new carpet, new tables, a new paint job, a bigger eating area and a new café that is expected to open by the end of the month.

"That's not quite ready yet. In place of that we have a new tent outside. The tent outside is a heated tent and people can get everything they would've gotten in the cafeteria. That'll be here all season also," said Sno Mountain general manager Rich Schwartz.

Right now three of the 21 trails on the mountain are open and managers hope to open even more if mother nature cooperates.

It's not just Sno Mountain hoping for the cold weather to continue but all ski resorts in our area. Although rain is expected for the weekend, managers at Sno Mountain are trying to remain optimistic.

They said they're already looking forward to next week when temperatures are expected to drop again.

For the latest ski conditions for all ski resorts in our area, click HERE.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1030  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 1:24 AM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
I'm bringing forward the website of architects for the new Intermodal Transportaion Center...decent design........just clik on "projects', then 'Urban Revitalization' inside the link to view the ITC photos.......

http://www.facilitydesignltd.com/

Last edited by donybrx; Jan 15, 2007 at 1:29 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1031  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 2:01 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
Bit more on the topic of Scranton-NYC rail service....progress, I guess:
**********************************************

01/15/2007
Study: Rail link won’t disrupt surroundings
BY BORYS KRAWCZENIUK
STAFF WRITER


The proposed Scranton-to-Hoboken, N.J., passenger train will have relatively minor environmental effects on its surroundings, the agency planning it suggests in a new study.



The study will be at the heart of public meetings on the project in Scranton and three other locations in the next two weeks.

An assessment of the train’s potential environmental impact says any effects probably will be insignificant, temporary or manageable, according to an analysis by New Jersey Transit, which would operate the train.

Based on a review of the assessment, the worst effect of the proposed $551 million project might be the rumble of its locomotives and the blare of their whistles as the trains roll through residential neighborhoods. That’s mainly because the train will use an existing railroad right of way and because new station stops will be built with new traffic signals to reduce congestion, according to the assessment.

People in at least 448 homes along the 133-mile route — including 118 homes between Scranton and Pocono Mountain — would hear an impact, which is defined as noticeable noise but insufficient to make people react adversely. Another 38 homes — nine in New Jersey and 29 in Monroe County — would be severely impacted, defined as highly annoying noise. None in Lackawanna County would be severely impacted.

Communities affected by noise could apply for federal “quiet zone” designations, which restrict the sounding of train horns where the communities install crossing gates or other features meant to warn car drivers.

The assessment is a step along the way toward asking the Federal Transit Administration for permission to begin preliminary engineering, the phase when planning gets more serious and details are refined. Construction remains years away.

New Jersey Transit has scheduled four meetings for public comment on the assessment. The first is at the Hilton Scranton and Conference Center from 3 to 8 p.m. Wednesday. Other hearings are planned Jan. 25 in Stroudsburg, Jan. 23 in Andover, N.J., and Jan. 29 in Blairstown, N.J.

People who attend may ask questions after project officials make presentations. At 4 and 7 p.m., a stenographer will record formal public comments.

The assessment says:

¦ Eight stations and two proposed maintenance facilities — one in Scranton — would be generally compatible with surrounding uses.

Any new development would be likeliest near rail stations and would have to comply with local zoning regulations anyway.

The project calls for the acquisition of only 11 properties, only one of which would be in Lackawanna County— at 230 Seventh Ave. in Scranton, which is owned by Baldino Development Agency Inc. The company’s owners could not be determined. It would be home to a rail yard, where train cars would be stored and maintained.

¦ Trains crossing local streets would delay emergency vehicles only as long as it takes for an eight-car train to pass, which is only a “short duration.”

¦ Only 11 vehicles would drive to the Scranton station for the most heavily used departing train, one at 5:30 a.m. That isn’t enough to cause traffic congestion. The effects of traffic at other stations would generally be somewhat reduced by better traffic signal systems.

¦ Air quality would be hurt and helped, but only slightly in both cases. A train would reduce car traffic and, thus, the amount of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide released. But the amount of soot and nitrogen oxides would increase.

¦ Each station would have plenty of parking.

¦ Bus companies won’t lose much business because they will likely pick up more customers as Northeastern Pennsylvania, already growing fast, continues its rapid growth.

Contact the writer: bkrawczeniuk@timesshamrock.com
Project details

Key details of the proposed Scranton-to-Hoboken, N.J., passenger train.

¦ Cost: $551 million

¦ Annual revenues: $13.9 million

¦ Annual operation and maintenance: $26.2 million

¦ Responsible for operating deficit: Pennsylvania and New Jersey

¦ Travel from Scranton: 3 hours, 20 minutes

¦ Overall ridership: 3,520 daily eastbound

¦ Scranton ridership: 40 eastbound
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1032  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2007, 10:05 PM
Ex-Ithacan's Avatar
Ex-Ithacan Ex-Ithacan is offline
Old Fart Forumer
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Live in DC suburbs-Maryland
Posts: 21,463
Love that Facility Design site, gonna have to spend some time there soon (when the forum is a bit faster)
__________________
Get off my lawn you whippersnappers!!!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1033  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 1:38 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
^^^I agree, EX. I was surprised to see the breadth of their work and the quality...!

I'm also pleasantly surprised that Wilks-Barre is home to two distinguished architectural/planning firms...the other being Bohlin, Cywinski, Jackson with other offices in Phila Pittsburgh, Seattle & San Fran. Their site is:
http://www.bcj.com/

Facility Design has offices in Wilkes-Barre and NYC.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1034  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2007, 8:20 PM
Snakeyes Snakeyes is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 91
Word is out that silent bidding has begun on the Southern Union building on Lackawanna ave.


Something to watch for....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1035  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 4:08 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
Definitely, Snakeyes......please keep us posted.......!

meantime. in WB. Ugh. Somebody hold me..... No. Better yet, sedate me ...
I know it's dinkburg by comparison, but it was my first skyline thrall til I laid eyes on NYC when a kid of 5......I won't be happy 'til I hear that a 35 story muti-use tower is planned for the site of Sterling Tower....
---------------------------------
Posted on Tue, Jan. 16, 2007

Sterling project
Hotel demolition picks up
W-B landmark’s rear façade gone

By KEVIN AMERMAN kamerman@timesleader.com

After demolition, it will take about 18 months to convert the seven-story corner building on the site into a commercial and residential structure, said Alex Rogers of CityVest.

WILKES-BARRE – The entire rear façade of a landmark hotel building is now completely gone as work to demolish parts of the historic property has sped up.

Workers demolishing two former Hotel Sterling buildings can now use ground-based equipment, which can rip through walls and floors much quicker than the hand equipment that had been used in a floor-by-floor manner, said Alex Rogers of CityVest, the not-for-profit organization that is converting another, seven-story section of the former luxurious hotel into residential and retail space.

The process of demolishing the 14-story building on the property had been slowed when workers found out how badly deteriorated the floors of the decaying hotel building are. They had planned to raze the building by placing light equipment, such as small bulldozers, on each floor and ripping each one down one-by-one. But workers soon learned that the floors of the building are so moldy and weak that they couldn’t support the weight of the light equipment.

In November, a worker fell through two stories when a portion of the 12th floor collapsed. So, Rogers said the workers were forced to go from “light equipment to even lighter equipment” with some even using picks and hammers.

Now, ground-based equipment can reach the highest remaining levels, so the speed of the project has picked up, Rogers said.

“It took considerable time to get to this stage,” Rogers said.

A four-story building on the lot is also being torn down.

Rogers could not say Monday when the demolition process will be completed.

He said he has a meeting tomorrow with the project manager and the on-site supervisor and he might get a better idea then.

After demolition, it will take about 18 months to convert the seven-story corner building on the site into a commercial and residential structure, Rogers said.

The mild weather this winter has helped things move along.

Rogers said crews were prepared to work in poor conditions, but the lack of snow and ice “has certainly made it easier.”


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kevin Amerman, a Times Leader staff writer, may be reached at 829-7218.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1036  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 7:19 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
Great News!

BREAKING NEWS!!!!
{no pun intended ... }

Rare coalbreaker to be spared....Wilkes-Barre continues to have good news...
click on link for photo.....

http://www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/16481177.htm

Next time you head north on I-81 see the breaker to your left around the Nanticoke/Ashley exits.....on the downward slope of the mountainside.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted on Wed, Jan. 17, 2007

Ashley breaker to be saved

The historic Huber Breaker has been saved from the wrecking ball.

Luzerne County Commissioners unanimously voted Wednesday to take control of the Ashley coal breaker through eminent domain.

A court-appointed review board will establish the fair market value price that the county must pay to No. 1 Contracting, which owns the breaker and 26 surrounding acres.

While No. 1 Contracting may appeal, county officials say it’s highly unlikely the company will succeed because the county is taking the property for “purely public purpose.” Commissioners came up with the takeover plan because No. 1 Contracting owner Al Roman recently told the county that he is thinking of selling the breaker for its scrap value and selling the land for development.

For the complete story, read Thursday’s edition.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1037  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 8:49 PM
Ex-Ithacan's Avatar
Ex-Ithacan Ex-Ithacan is offline
Old Fart Forumer
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Live in DC suburbs-Maryland
Posts: 21,463
^ Yippee, that is good news.

As for the Sterling Hotel site, seems that such a prominent location as you cross from Kingston should have just as important a structure on it. Cutting that structure in half and fixing it up is just not enough. Height dammit, we need height.
__________________
Get off my lawn you whippersnappers!!!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1038  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 10:26 PM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
^^^ hahahahah, yeah, Babaaaaay...height.

Look. Wilkes Barre is till the hub for an urban area of at least 200,000 if you include the Back Mountain, Bear Creek and Mountain Top sections... why not a 25- 35 story tower within a re-emerging downtown? Mixed uses including retail, apartments with wonderful river, city & mountain views, offices and mebbe some hotel rooms....

For the Huber breaker..I had a vision...turn it into a roller coaster...like the 'Mine Menace" or "black lung barracuda".....and make a park around it including historical stuff....heh.

Yep. Stone sober.....
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1039  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2007, 11:14 PM
Ex-Ithacan's Avatar
Ex-Ithacan Ex-Ithacan is offline
Old Fart Forumer
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Live in DC suburbs-Maryland
Posts: 21,463
^ Sounds like my pipe dreams for Ithaca. Boy oh boy, could I make that place look cool. I guess it costs some money to do that stuff though, eh?
__________________
Get off my lawn you whippersnappers!!!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #1040  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2007, 1:18 AM
donybrx donybrx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 4,966
LOL...yessiree...^^^

Here's a fuller account of the Huber breaker-make-or taker from today's paper:

----------------------------------------------
Posted on Thu, Jan. 18, 2007

County takes control of Huber Breaker

By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES jandes@timesleader.com

The historic Huber Breaker has been saved from the wrecking ball and will eventually be turned into a mining museum, Luzerne County Commissioners announced Wednesday.

Commissioners unanimously voted to take control of the Ashley landmark through eminent domain. That ensures the owner – Al Roman of No. 1 Contracting – receives a fair price and does not sell the breaker for scrap as he recently threatened, county officials say.

“As of this minute, Luzerne County owns title to the 26 acres and the breaker,” said Commissioner Todd Vonderheid.

The county and No. 1 may each present a certified appraisal to a court-appointed board, which will then set the price to be paid by the county.

Commissioners on Wednesday hired Wilkes-Barre attorney John Aciukewicz, at $150 an hour, to work on the condemnation of the Huber property as well as a downtown Hazleton structure that commissioners want to use for a southern annex.

While Roman has the right to appeal the county takeover, county officials say it’s highly unlikely he will succeed because the property will be used for “purely public purpose.” Roman could not be reached for comment Wednesday.

No. 1 Contracting acquired the breaker and surrounding land in 1997 for $25,000, according to county records. Roman recently told the county he believes the property is worth $800,000, county officials say.

Tony Mussari, who has been active with the Huber Breaker Preservation Society, congratulated commissioners for the “bold” and “historic” step.

“Many people for many, many years have been trying to get to this point,” Mussari said during Wednesday’s meeting. “This is a wonderful moment for Luzerne County.”

But Vonderheid cautioned that the tough part is ahead: finding an experienced partner to develop the site. The museum project is estimated to cost $9 million.

“It’s not a simple task. You can’t just hand this to a volunteer group,” Vonderheid told fellow commissioners. “We have to find a capable and professional entity that has redevelopment, project management and construction experience.”

The Luzerne County Redevelopment Authority has been leaning against taking over the project.

Minority Commissioner Stephen A. Urban, the grandson of a miner, said he started supporting the museum idea around eight years ago because he wants to preserve local history.

“It would be a shame to see this structure destroyed,” he said.

Commissioner Greg Skrepenak said the project has become personal. He was recently rummaging through old stuff and found his grandfather’s death certificate, which stated that he died from complications caused by an accident at the Huber Breaker.

“The exciting thing to me about this is that my children and future generations will know not only what my grandfather sacrificed, but what all the men sacrificed and families sacrificed to make this county what it is today and make this country what it is,” Skrepenak said.

Vonderheid said he grew up in the shadow of the Huber and even confessed to breaking some of the windows as a boy. Built by the Glen Alden Coal Co., the breaker closed for good in 1976.

“From my home in Hanover Township, I would walk out my front porch and see the breaker every day of my life growing up. And so, it’s a real important thing to me,” he said.

The county can’t move forward “if we don’t first preserve and understand who we are and how we’ve gotten to this point,” he said.

“I think there are a lot of people in this community who try to hide from the past and are somehow ashamed of their past,” he said.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Northeast
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:42 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.