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  #1  
Old Posted May 28, 2008, 3:56 PM
Hammer Town Hammer Town is offline
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Port of Hamilton

Hey Everyone
I've noticed over the past while that nobody ever talks about things happening with the Port. We have the biggest port o the canadian side of the great lakes. I only know of a few things happening as far as the plan to build the container facility at Peir 22. As well as some areas for development in the vacinity of peir 15 as well. anyway I just though I would initiate this Thread and see if anyone has any other info they would like to add.
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  #2  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2008, 1:42 PM
markbarbera markbarbera is offline
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What came in and out of the Port of Hamilton last week:

Source: The Hamilton Spectator
(Jun 12, 2008)
Estimated total tonnage: 441,305

Total ships in and out: 23

Domestic: 20

International: 3

Percentage of imports: 89.6

Percentage of exports: 10.4

Incoming:

14 vessels arrived with bulk raw materials (coal/ore/coke) used in production at ArcelorMittal Dofasco and U.S. Steel Canada. Two vessels arrived carrying petroleum products and one ship arrived carrying stone

Outgoing:

Four vessels exported petroleum products. Two ships exported steel and one also exported millscale.

Highlights for the week:

The Algoma Central dry bulk carrier Algoville has been renamed the Tim S. Dool to honour Dool, who recently retired as president and CEO of Algoma Central Corporation. The new name was added to the vessel while docked in Port Weller.

One vessel exported millscale, a residue which results from the cooling of steel.

The Peter R. Cresswell called the port with inbound cargo of dolomite stone. Dolomite is quarried for building and road stone and used in the production of refractory brick.
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  #3  
Old Posted Jul 16, 2008, 8:33 PM
markbarbera markbarbera is offline
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Shipping News

The Hamilton Spectator
(Jul 16, 2008)
What came in and out of the Port of Hamilton July 6-12

Estimated total tonnage: 373,058

Total ships in and out: 25

Domestic: 19

International: 6

Percentage of imports: 81.6

Percentage of exports: 18.4

Incoming: 10 vessels arrived with bulk raw materials (coal and ore) used in production at steel mills ArcelorMittal Dofasco and U.S. Steel Canada. Six ships came into the harbour with steel, and three vessels transported petroleum products. Two vessels carried agricultural products and one handled aggregate.

Outgoing: Three vessels exported steel.

Highlights for the week

A significant week for steel cargoes both inbound and outbound highlighted by vessels Yarmouth, Bluewing and Federal Power with import steel, and Bluebill and Gargany loading steel for export to the United Kingdom and Belgium.

The MV Annalisa arrived with inbound steel, repositioning to Eastport to load an export cargo of grain bound for Europe.

The MV Cuyahoga arrived with a cargo of stone after stopping in the St. Lawrence River at the Port of Prescott.
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  #4  
Old Posted Jul 17, 2008, 7:04 PM
thistleclub thistleclub is offline
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A waterfront-related item from the front page of today's Toronto Star: No new plant at Lakeview

Quote:
The coal is gone, and now gas is out, too.

The province's announcement yesterday that it will not put a gas-fired generator on the site of the demolished coal-fired Lakeview power plant opens the door to a grand, citizen-developed waterfront plan that was enthusiastically endorsed in principle by Mississauga city council in February.

"It's a great day," said a relieved Jim Tovey, president of the Lakeview Ratepayers Association, which was credited by Energy Minister George Smitherman yesterday for helping to influence the decision.

"It's an amazing thing," Tovey said of the group's success in persuading the city not to back another power plant along the lakeshore. "This is a sign that any community can implement positive change. It's just a matter of doing your homework."

The announcement is historic for the east-end Mississauga neighbourhood, which has been industrialized since the late 19th century – first as an artillery range in the 1890s, then as an airstrip in World War I, a munitions factory in World War II, and finally as one of the province's major power producers and the GTA's single worst source of air pollution.

"We're proud of the area's past contributions, but now it's time to move on," Tovey said.

John Danahy, a University of Toronto professor and landscape architect who took charge of the ratepayers association plan, also hailed the announcement.

"I think this is going to be the poster child for smart growth of the province," he said.

At a waterfront news conference, Smitherman said he is ordering the Ontario Power Authority to launch a bidding process for a gas-fired plant elsewhere in the western GTA.

He acknowledged that, while defusing the Lakeview controversy, he is fuelling another because, to use existing transmission lines, a new plant must be placed between east Oakville and west Etobicoke.

Tovey's 800-member group hopes to see 200 hectares of Lakeview industrial land – an area more than two and a half times the size of Exhibition Place – become a thriving mixed-use community, with medium-rise buildings, residential, employment and educational sites, and a "destination" waterfront area devoted to trails, parks, an aquarium or stadium, and a pier with entertainment and educational features.
And Christopher Hume weighs in:

Quote:
A project such as this has the capacity to transform not just Mississauga, but the region.

Once the old coal-fired facility was closed in 2005, residents started to look at the property with fresh eyes. It didn't take long for them to realize its enormous potential. There's space here to build dense and sustainable mixed-use neighbourhoods, parks, marinas and ice-skating canals, all serviced by public transit.

This is the kind of thing that can help transform a suburb into a city.

....

So far, Ontarians and their politicians have found it hard to contemplate life after cheap fuel. Given how much of the provincial economy was bound up in the auto sector, perhaps that's no surprise. But that's over now — and rather than cry about the good old days, we should look ahead. The new reality also presents new opportunities.

Until yesterday's announcement, the main difference between the old Lakeview and the new one was the use of natural gas rather than coal.

The former is preferable to the latter, but hardly progressive or innovative.

On the other hand, the decision to build elsewhere represents a rare instance of official common sense. It recognizes that in a post-industrial era, waterfronts are too valuable to squander on power plants.
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"Where architectural imagination is absent, the case is hopeless." - Louis Sullivan
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  #5  
Old Posted Jul 13, 2011, 2:35 PM
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Richardson Expands Hamilton Port Terminal to Increase Capacity

http://www.marketwire.com/press-rele...ty-1537741.htm

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA--(Marketwire - July 13, 2011) - Richardson International Limited is investing $5.5 million to expand its port terminal facility in Hamilton, Ontario to increase handling and shipping capacity to meet growing demand.

The Hamilton enhancements include the addition of a third receiving pit and elevation leg with two new truck beam scales. This will increase truck receiving handling capacity by one-third to meet the demand for grain deliveries. Richardson will also be adding a second vessel-shipping tower to increase shipping capacity.

"Hamilton has emerged as a major grain hub in Ontario and demand continues to grow," says Darwin Sobkow, Richardson's Vice-President, Agribusiness Operations. "We are committed to investing in our facility to improve efficiency and meet the needs of all of our customers."

Richardson is also adding a 2,000 square foot office addition to its Hamilton port terminal as part of the expansion project. The new grain receiving pit/leg and scales will be operational in time for the fall corn and bean harvest, while the new shipping tower will be finished in 2012. Richardson is committed to continuing to invest in its Hamilton facility and plans to make further announcements about additional storage capacity and other enhancements in the near future.

"This expansion is the latest in a number of investments we have made at Hamilton to keep pace with growing demand," says Sobkow. "Richardson was the first to invest in a grain vessel loading facility in the port of Hamilton over a decade ago and we are well positioned to capture increasing demand."

Richardson International is Canada's largest, privately owned agribusiness and has served farmers across the country for more than 150 years. Based in Winnipeg, Richardson has over 1,600 employees across Canada and is a worldwide handler and merchandiser of all major Canadian-grown grains and oilseeds. Richardson is one of Canada's 50 Best Managed Companies and is recognized as a global leader in agriculture and food processing.
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  #6  
Old Posted Nov 2, 2011, 3:26 PM
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New study shows that Port of Hamilton adds $5.9B to Canadian economy

http://www.ctl.ca/news/new-study-sho...my/1000653422/
By: Lou Smyrlis
2011-11-02

HAMILTON, Ont. -- Cargo shipments to and from the Port of Hamilton generate $5.9 billion of economic activity and 38,000 jobs in Ontario, according to a new study released.

The new analysis is part of a wider study carried out by economic consultants Martin Associates that revealed in October the economic value of the entire bi-national Great Lakes-Seaway System and its more than 100 ports.

The Port of Hamilton statistics, which include cargo carried to and from the port by U.S., Canadian and international ships, revealed:

Jobs

* Of the 98K jobs created in Canada by activity of the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway, almost 40% (38K) are created by the activity in the Port of Hamilton which includes 16,482 jobs directly generated by maritime & port activity in Hamilton
* Those jobs provide $1.7 billion in personal income
* Drives $1.7 billion in local purchases

Economic Activity

* The economic activity generated by the Port of Hamilton totals over $5.9 billion or 37% of the Canadian activity generated by the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway
* In addition, Provincial and Federal taxes created by the economic impact of the Port of Hamilton total over $700 million
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