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  #1  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2011, 12:37 PM
bornagainbiking bornagainbiking is offline
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Pedestrian safety

I think that pedestrians have to get back down to basics. What ever happened to "Stop, Look and Listen.
I see constantly, people on their MP3s, iPod, cell phones walking with their heads down directly into traffic mid-block.
Wearing dark cloths at night, wearing hoodies pulled up to impede vision to the sides, riding their bikes with no light weaving in and out of traffic many times going the wrong way on one way streets.
Just last week, I was driving (under speed limit) in the inside lane and outside lane occupied (morning commute) a young adult with his hoodie up and standing on the sidewalk with his toes over the edge decides to stretch his back and leans forward. Didn't look and the hoodie up. I moved left as far as possible (car there) and just missed his head no sorry his head just missed my mirror.
Where has common sense gone, I see young kids run out in front of cars and yell at the drivers. Crappy gamble as these kids don't grasp, some mistakes have lifelong effects.
I suggest that the police start an education program (remember Elmer), and also crack down on stupidity.
I drive, walk and bike and we are responsible for our own safety in many cases. Vehicles have back-up lights for a reason yet people will still walk behind you coming out of your blind-spot. Also kind of hard to hear a V8 let alone an electric or hybrid car or bike with war buds in and tunes blaring.
This ain't a blame game as do you want to be right or alive.
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  #2  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2011, 4:42 PM
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I'm glad you make this point. Presumably everyone has heard of 'defensive driving' and hopefully most practice it.

But how often do we hear the terms 'defensive bicycling' or 'defensive walking' used? Personally, I've never heard either term used but that's what most (surviving) pedestrians and cyclists in fact do.

Yet I do see people who step off the curb without so much as a glance for traffic, especially right-turning traffic. Yes, sometimes they even have earbuds or hoodies on.

And recently, in Toronto, we had the case of a pregnant mother who basically threw herself under the wheels of a truck that was making a right hand turn at a very complicated intersection frequented by trucks.

Does anyone ever talk about defensive road use? No, instead all you hear is how the poor victim shouldn't have died.

Everyone knows that our roads aren't especially well designed for use by non-motorized traffic. Who hasn't seen the way cars zip around way too fast for the conditions (not to mention the driver's ability and level of attention given)?

So why do people continue to rely upon the care, control, and consideration of drivers for their personal safety?
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  #3  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2013, 1:25 PM
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I thing I noticed while at Kingston is that they have a lot of "Courtesy Crossing".



Cars don't absolutely have to stop but it's courtesy if you do and let the pedestrian cross.
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  #4  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2013, 4:39 PM
movingtohamilton movingtohamilton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelTown View Post
I thing I noticed while at Kingston is that they have a lot of "Courtesy Crossing".



Cars don't absolutely have to stop but it's courtesy if you do and let the pedestrian cross.
I call bullsiht on this. There's no such thing as a "courtesy crosswalk" except in the imagination of municipal civil servants.

A crosswalk requires motorists to stop, according to the Ontario Highway Traffic Act:

140.1 (1) Subject to subsection (2), when a pedestrian or a person in a wheelchair crossing a roadway within a pedestrian crossover,

(a) is upon the half of the roadway upon which a vehicle or street car is travelling; or

(b) is upon half of the roadway and is approaching the other half of the roadway on which a vehicle or street car is approaching so closely to the pedestrian crossover as to endanger him or her, the driver of the vehicle or street car shall yield the right of way to the pedestrian or a person in a wheelchair by slowing down or stopping if necessary.
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  #5  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2013, 4:54 PM
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Courtesy Crossings for pedestrians are marked with oversized yellow fluorescent signs and white ladder-type crosswalk pavement markings. Courtesy Crossings are unique to Ontario and Kingston has 10 of them.*

While no law requires vehicles to stop for pedestrians at Courtesy Crossings, local research shows more than half of motorists will stop for pedestrians at these crossings.

http://www.cityofkingston.ca/residen...ic/pedestrians
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  #6  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2013, 5:08 PM
movingtohamilton movingtohamilton is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteelTown View Post
Courtesy Crossings for pedestrians are marked with oversized yellow fluorescent signs and white ladder-type crosswalk pavement markings. Courtesy Crossings are unique to Ontario and Kingston has 10 of them.*

While no law requires vehicles to stop for pedestrians at Courtesy Crossings, local research shows more than half of motorists will stop for pedestrians at these crossings.

http://www.cityofkingston.ca/residen...ic/pedestrians
Thanks for the details. But I still call this BS. These are obviously crosswalks. In my opinion, if tested in court through a civil action the municipality of Kingston would have a tough fight on its hands in trying to defend these as "optional for drivers".
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Old Posted Nov 1, 2013, 12:17 PM
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  #8  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2013, 2:17 PM
movingtohamilton movingtohamilton is offline
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Here we go! City staff recommending "courtesy crossings".

http://raisethehammer.org/article/1998
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  #9  
Old Posted Nov 4, 2013, 2:25 PM
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lol yep seen plenty of those at Kingston.
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  #10  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2013, 12:04 AM
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The city installs signs to improve walkability and it's an 'anti-pedestrian' outrage because the city is not adopting the writer's interpretation of the traffic act???
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  #11  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2013, 12:14 AM
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How does a sign that proclaims that cars don't have to stop increasing walkability? Thats even worse than if the signs weren't there at all as cars will feel more entitled to racing through and scaring pedestrians back onto the sidewalk.
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  #12  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2013, 1:02 AM
coalminecanary coalminecanary is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by durandy View Post
The city installs signs to improve walkability and it's an 'anti-pedestrian' outrage because the city is not adopting the writer's interpretation of the traffic act???
Did you read the article?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian Plan
"Courtesy Crossings" do not give pedestrians the right-of-way to enter an intersection.
The signs are going to tall pedestrians to look out for cars. Who is that a courtesy to exactly? How does it improve walkability?

Furthermore,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raise The Hammer
As the Ministry of Transportation recently explained, the respective rights of pedestrians and vehicles at an uncontrolled crossing are actually quite clear: pedestrians can cross provided there is a sufficient gap to allow motorists to come to a safe stop and motorists must yield to a pedestrian who has begun crossing.

This is the law and the interpretation we received from the Ministry of Transportation.
I have also read the law, and the MOT and Mr. Kevlahan's interpretations make complete sense. Do you have a different interpretation?
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  #13  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2013, 1:51 AM
durandy durandy is offline
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It's a marked crossing with a sign warning people that cars are not obligated to stop. The sign is pointed to pedestrians not to cars. The whole point of the initiative is to give people more places to cross streets safely. The point of the sign is to tell people that cars do not have to stop at these crossings unless a pedestrian is about to cross. It's not a stop sign and lots of people haven't been immersed in the highway traffic act or have sophisticated theories about how the burden of proof should be shifted in pedestrian contexts. Bbefore you tell me that the traffic act says you that technically you can cross anywhere let's get real, what help is that to the kid crossing the street?
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  #14  
Old Posted Nov 5, 2013, 9:14 PM
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Sara Mayo of SPRC Hamilton has produced an 11-page briefing on the PMP.
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  #15  
Old Posted Dec 30, 2015, 6:32 PM
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New rules at pedestrian crossovers and school crossings

Starting January 1st, 2016, drivers (including cyclists) must stop and yield the whole roadway at:
  • pedestrian crossovers; and,
  • at school crossings where there is a crossing guard displaying a school crossing stop sign.

These rules apply at pedestrian crossovers identified with specific signs, road markings and lights – the new rules do not apply to pedestrian crosswalks at intersections with stop signs or traffic signals, unless a school crossing guard is present.

The new law, part of Making Ontario’s Roads Safer Act, also provides municipal road authorities the ability to install new types of pedestrian crossovers on low speed, low volume roads in addition to the existing crossovers.
http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/saf...n-safety.shtml
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Old Posted Dec 30, 2015, 6:42 PM
HillStreetBlues HillStreetBlues is offline
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Ah, I misunderstood the new rules, thanks for that. I was under the impression that motorists had to yield the entire roadway (rather than just the one direction of travel, as previously the case) at all crosswalks. Instead, it's just at "crossovers."

I'm still not confident I know what a "crossover" is, though.

As someone who travels on foot in Hamilton, I'll continue operating under the assumption that any nincompoop who could get approved for credit enough to buy a car is above the law, and any misconceptions I have about having the right of way are always incorrect. But it's nice to know what the rules are for when I'm visiting more civilized parts of Ontario.
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  #17  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2016, 1:44 AM
mishap mishap is offline
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I'm still not confident I know what a "crossover" is, though.
A crossover is also nicknamed a "PED XING" because of the signs used to identify it. It is a crosswalk dedicated to pedestrians, generally midblock, and not part of an intersection. They are usually push-button activated with alternating overhead amber flashing lights.

As far as I know, we do not have any of these in Hamilton. Hamilton has opted to install traffic stoplights at these crosswalks, which was a safer option. "Clearing half" was never an issue, as all traffic had a red light while pedestrians were permitted to cross. What the new legislation does is make the "Ped Xings" almost identical to stoplight-controlled crosswalks.

I tend to think that stoplight-controlled crosswalks are better for two reasons. One, it reduces the number of different control devices that drivers have to observe. Two, pedestrian are supposed to follow a procedure to cross at "crossovers," though they never do, and likely aren't even aware of what they are supposed to do. (Stop, square up, INDICATE, wait for traffic to stop safely, LOOK, cross)

The legislation also applies to any standard crosswalk being controlled by a school crossing guard. I believe (don't take my word for it here) that all rules about a "divided roadway" would still apply in these cases.
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Old Posted Jan 3, 2016, 2:42 PM
coalminecanary coalminecanary is offline
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"Clearing half" can definitely be an issue at regular lights (pedestrian activated or not) because of turns on reds - especially on one-ways where drivers tend to only look in one direction while making a turn.

Also, except on very busy streets, PXO offers better service to both drivers pedestrians because drivers only have to stop while someone is actively crossing, and pedestrians get instant access. Normal lights force drivers to wait longer for a green (they can't cross when clear), and if the pedestrian crosses early, cars are often waiting for nobody. They are also much more expensive to implement, meaning it's less likely for the city to install them, meaning fewer safe crossings citywide.

We are supposed to be getting a PXO at queen/herkimer, I hope it's the beginning of a trend.
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  #19  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2016, 1:42 PM
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City scouting locations for new crosswalks that improve pedestrian safety

By Kelly Bennett, CBC News Posted: Jan 04, 2016 7:09 PM ET

Hamilton is looking to install at least 20 crosswalks covered by stricter new rules that better protect pedestrians and have harsher punishments for drivers who disobey them.

The new rules came into effect on Jan. 1 requiring more patience for Ontario drivers waiting for pedestrians to cross the road in certain types of crossings. Drivers face fines of up to $500 if they don't wait until a pedestrian has completely crossed the road before they go again.

For now, Hamilton only has one type of crossing affected by the new rules, but city traffic staff say that could change in the coming months.

The rules affect school crossings when crossing guards are present and pedestrian "crossovers," usually controlled with signs and amber flashing lights.

For now, in Hamilton, "the only one that really comes into play is the school crossing locations," said Dave Ferguson, the city's traffic superintendent.

But in the next couple of months, city staff plan to bring a plan for city council approval that would install the pedestrian crossovers in certain locations across the city, he said.

The new rules and crossings come after eight pedestrians were killed in 2015, according to Hamilton Police. That's almost half of all of the 18 traffic fatalities reported by the police last year.

Ferguson said the plan will include around 20 locations where crossovers could be installed as early as this year without "a huge impact," and another phase of suggested locations that would require more planning, awareness campaigns and consultation.

One of the locations his team is working on is at Queen and Herkimer streets in Durand, he said, in response to a request from Coun. Aidan Johnson.

Ferguson said both drivers and pedestrians need to be taught about how the crossovers work.

"This is obviously a big change from what motorists have been used to," he said. "You don't want to just throw these things out there."

The crossovers and new laws will resemble what some drivers and pedestrians are used to from other parts of the country, he said.

"Ontario, for whatever reason, has a driver behavior where 'I need to get where I'm going fast, quick,'" he said. "I think there's going to be some growing pains with it and that's where the education component is really going to have to come into play."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilt...fety-1.3388821
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  #20  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2016, 2:53 AM
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First pedestrian crossovers pitched for Hamilton

Hamilton Spectator By Matthew Van Dongen

Councillors will consider locations for the city's first five pedestrian crossovers Thursday.

The pedestrian crossover differs from a painted crosswalk or controlled intersection because motorists must stop and wait until all pedestrians have left the roadway, under new provincial legislation that came into force this year.

The city has received 140 requests for crossovers so far, but traffic operations manager Martin White previously told the Spectator the department is "overwhelmed" with traffic-calming requests and can't do everything at once.

The department also wants to start slow to ensure drivers become familiar with the new rules — and the higher fines, ranging from $150 to $500 and up to three demerit points for ignoring the rules.

Pedestrian crossovers will feature special street markings, more visible signage and sometimes flashing beacons, similar to school crossings that share the same kinds of rules.

A report recommending five initial locations in Wards 1, 2, 6 and 15 will be considered by public works committee Thursday. It also proposes an education campaign to familiarize motorists and pedestrians with the new rules of the road.

An additional 14 locations across the urban city are also recommended as part of regular planned road work this year and next to "maximize construction efficiencies and lessen disruption," the report says.

The first locations were chosen based on the department's own traffic studies, collision and other safety statistics and consultation with ward councillors.

Two of the first five are in Ward 6, one on Mountain Brow Boulevard at Limeridge Road and the second on Limeridge at the rail trail.

Ward Coun. Tom Jackson said "thousands" of pedestrians are regularly crossing the busy Limeridge collector road to access the popular rail trail and nearby sports park. He added increasing numbers of visitors walk down and across Mountain Brow to access waterfalls east of the boulevard.

"It's busy, so if we can make a proactive, preventive move to ensure the safety of all of those walking and cycling in the area, I am all for it," he said.

The report says each pedestrian crossover can cost anywhere from $15,000 to $30,000 to install, depending in part on whether flashing lights are required. The city will use cash from a $11-million reserve fund annually topped up with fine revenue from red light camera tickets.


mvandongen@thespec.com

905-526-3241 | @Mattatthespec

Pedestrian crossovers

Here are the recommended first locations for pedestrian crossovers:

•Locke Street at Stanley Avenue (east/west);

•Queen Street at Herkimer Street (all directions);

•Limeridge Road at rail trail (north/south)

•Mountain Brow Boulevard at Limeridge Road (east/west)

•Hollybush Drive just west of Pentland Road (east/west)

http://www.thespec.com/news-story/68...-for-hamilton/
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