HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #2981  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2018, 12:54 PM
Acajack's Avatar
Acajack Acajack is offline
Monsieur Sainte-Nitouche
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vieux Canada
Posts: 31,844
I've always found the Montreal Jewish accent a bit New Yawkish.
__________________
SSP Canada's Most Interesting Man
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2982  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2018, 1:58 PM
esquire's Avatar
esquire esquire is offline
Think about Winnipeg.
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
There's a Montreal Jewish accent. Irwin Cotler is a good example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1W6lywxnwU
I always found Cotler's accent very distinctive. To my ears that could only be the accent of a Jewish man from Montreal.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2983  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2018, 10:49 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
There's a Montreal Jewish accent. Irwin Cotler is a good example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1W6lywxnwU
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I've always found the Montreal Jewish accent a bit New Yawkish.
Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire View Post
I always found Cotler's accent very distinctive. To my ears that could only be the accent of a Jewish man from Montreal.
Kind of goes back to the idea that Montreal's older "Anglo"-oriented or assimilated ethnic groups share a similar "Ellis Island" influence, more so than historic immigrant European communities farther west.

Yet it's still distinctively Jewish-Canadian, not Jewish-American, in the way for example you still have the Canadian raising vowel sounds.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2984  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2018, 10:52 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,503
What's the trend now for the English influence of "Anglo" oriented immigrants in Montreal now in terms of which accent they assimilate to?

Still a local homegrown English Canadian accent? General Canadian? General North American English?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2985  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2018, 3:00 PM
Acajack's Avatar
Acajack Acajack is offline
Monsieur Sainte-Nitouche
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vieux Canada
Posts: 31,844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
Kind of goes back to the idea that Montreal's older "Anglo"-oriented or assimilated ethnic groups share a similar "Ellis Island" influence, more so than historic immigrant European communities farther west.
.
Anglo-oriented Italian Montrealers also have a New Yawkish sound to their accent IMO. Or at least they used to - this seems to be changing though.
__________________
SSP Canada's Most Interesting Man

Last edited by Acajack; Apr 5, 2018 at 3:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2986  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2018, 3:12 PM
esquire's Avatar
esquire esquire is offline
Think about Winnipeg.
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 19,364
^ The Jewish NY and Mtl accents sound very distinctive to my ears. I would never confuse Cotler's accent for Bernie Sanders', for example.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2987  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2018, 3:18 PM
Acajack's Avatar
Acajack Acajack is offline
Monsieur Sainte-Nitouche
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Vieux Canada
Posts: 31,844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsicum View Post
What's the trend now for the English influence of "Anglo" oriented immigrants in Montreal now in terms of which accent they assimilate to?

Still a local homegrown English Canadian accent? General Canadian? General North American English?
That's an interesting question.

My sense is that Anglo-Montrealers are less and less "just among themselves" these days, which is not really conducive to maintaining a single accent across the community or even giving rise to a new one.

For the average Anglo-Montrealer, a lot of their daily conversations in English are probably with second or third language English speakers (both francophones and allophones) as opposed to native anglos. And that's not even mentioning daily conversations that take place in French. Or a mix of French and English.
__________________
SSP Canada's Most Interesting Man
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2988  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2018, 5:54 PM
Docere Docere is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire View Post
^ The Jewish NY and Mtl accents sound very distinctive to my ears. I would never confuse Cotler's accent for Bernie Sanders', for example.
Yeah, I wouldn't mix up a Montreal Jewish accent with a NYC one.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2989  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2018, 9:17 PM
Capsicum's Avatar
Capsicum Capsicum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Western Hemisphere
Posts: 1,503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
That's an interesting question.

My sense is that Anglo-Montrealers are less and less "just among themselves" these days, which is not really conducive to maintaining a single accent across the community or even giving rise to a new one.

For the average Anglo-Montrealer, a lot of their daily conversations in English are probably with second or third language English speakers (both francophones and allophones) as opposed to native anglos. And that's not even mentioning daily conversations that take place in French. Or a mix of French and English.
It's interesting that Montreal Anglos historically (and even more so now) despite living in one city were fractured and not really one "speech community", yet western Canadians are so homogeneous in accent despite being separated from one another by hundreds or thousands of km of sparsely populated terrain and sharing such disparate original roots or linguistic heritage (eg. British Columbians descended from Brits, versus Albertans who were originally Americans versus western Canadians descended from easterners etc., plus all the immigrants directly moving to the west straight from overseas, be they Norweigians, Ukrainians, Germans, Chinese etc).

Something managed to unite western Canadians to assimilate to a relatively homogeneous accent despite the vast distances involved and time spent travelling between them.

Then again, social distance and geographical distances don't line up. The example of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) stood out to me living in the US. I definitely noticed that various black communities all over the country, from California to the northeast shared elements of AAVE that had noticeable similarities with southern US English, despite being thousands of miles away -- a shared history (including segregation and a strong Black American identity that ensued) made a Californian speaker of AAVE and New Yorker AAVE speaker sound more like one another than their other Californian and New York neighbours.

Often the things that divide us in terms of who we talk and don't talk to, and end up sounding like during our formative years aren't a matter of physical or geographic barriers but social ones.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 8:12 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.