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  #2101  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2017, 7:45 PM
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Vancouver emerging as global maritime hub, says major European report
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The view east from Kaity Arsoniadis-Stein’s office window shows the Port of Vancouver, through which hundreds of millions of dollars worth of cargo pass every day.

But as vital as the waterfront activity is to the region’s economy, Arsoniadis-Stein is less concerned with the docks and more focused on what’s happening a few blocks south: office towers in the city’s commercial centre, where the businesses of maritime law, finance and technology are conducted.

And if Arsoniadis-Stein — executive director of the Vancouver International Maritime Centre — is successful, the coming years will see substantially more maritime business activity in those towers.

For the first time, Vancouver this year has become one of the leading maritime capitals of the world, according to a new report from Europe.

“This isn’t about tankers moving in the Burrard Inlet, this is about the corporate activity behind global trade,” said Arsoniadis-Stein.
http://vancouversun.com/business/local-business
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  #2102  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2017, 11:28 PM
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I still wonder why Atlantic Canada is struggling so badly to create jobs compared to, say, Toronto or Vancouver. They are the lowest price jurisdiction in Canada by quite a wide margin and taxes aren't exceptionally high compared to Quebec, Ontario or some US states. Is distance the big killer there?
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  #2103  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 1:06 AM
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Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
I still wonder why Atlantic Canada is struggling so badly to create jobs compared to, say, Toronto or Vancouver. They are the lowest price jurisdiction in Canada by quite a wide margin and taxes aren't exceptionally high compared to Quebec, Ontario or some US states. Is distance the big killer there?
The unemployment rate on the Island of Montréal has not been this low since 1987. 7.3%
Quebec is leading in jobs creation since at least 2015. and leads in private sector jobs
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  #2104  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 2:06 AM
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Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
I still wonder why Atlantic Canada is struggling so badly to create jobs compared to, say, Toronto or Vancouver. They are the lowest price jurisdiction in Canada by quite a wide margin and taxes aren't exceptionally high compared to Quebec, Ontario or some US states. Is distance the big killer there?
In terms of international shipping or just in general? Others can chime in with better insight than myself but trucking and railing distance are a big downside. The ports in Saint John and Halifax are growing and seeing increased traffic every season. The local market in the Maritimes simply isn't that large and the larger key markets are a day away for some transport.

In general we have very limited population growth for a number of different reasons (demographics, aging, immigration caps). Job creation is a difficult sell if there's no growth potential in many areas. Jobs could be created via resource development, as an example, but NB and NS have enacted moratoriums on things like fracking and have decided to focus their economic development plans elsewhere. We do have a lot of people moving here from elsewhere in the country because our cost of living is so much lower compared to Toronto or Vancouver but the relative local economy and job market is so poor it's almost not worth it. Because NB and NS are so much older in median age compared to the rest of Canada it's going to be interesting to see what happens when all the baby boomers retire in the next 10-15 years and what happens with all of their jobs, either if they dry up or if there's a big immigration push/youth push to fill those positions. There's not enough young people here right now to support the healthcare and seniorcare costs that are about to rise.

This doesn't even get into the issues of rural areas drying up and emptying out which is currently happening and which will increase in the coming years. We're seeing large population shifts in NB and NS as their respective populations begin to centralize in urban areas. Both provinces are floating around the low 50%s for urban populations - much lower than Canada's larger provinces.

New Brunswick will be benefiting from higher exports to the US and a lower Canadian dollar as NB is the most dependent province on export trade to the US as a % of total exports.
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  #2105  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 8:44 AM
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Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
I still wonder why Atlantic Canada is struggling so badly to create jobs compared to, say, Toronto or Vancouver. They are the lowest price jurisdiction in Canada by quite a wide margin and taxes aren't exceptionally high compared to Quebec, Ontario or some US states. Is distance the big killer there?
I'm 40 years old and I'm pretty sure that the Atlantic provinces are actually doing the best they have done economically overall since I was born. The cities are doing very well but it's the rural areas that are struggling which is pretty common across North America.

Distance is an issue for Newfoundland and Labrador but not as much for the maritime provinces. There are also things such as infrastructure and being around many other large companies and suppliers that attracts large employers.
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  #2106  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 9:10 AM
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Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
The unemployment rate on the Island of Montréal has not been this low since 1987. 7.3%
Quebec is leading in jobs creation since at least 2015. and leads in private sector jobs
Do you mean job growth in Canada? Technically BC has had a higher job growth in both 2016 and 2015 than Quebec. But Quebec's growth has been amazing and such a big turnaround, they are definitely at the leaderboard now.
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  #2107  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by shreddog View Post
And regarding equalization, FTR every province that charges a royalty on a natural resource, and water is on, has those royalties included as part of the provinces fiscal capability.

Since 2007 Quebec has been charging said water royalties which therefore DOES impact the amount of equalization dollars it gets. (hint: these royalties reduce the total amount of equalization dollars received)***

Sheshhh. With the number of times this topic has been beaten to death here, you'd think more people would be aware such things.


*** In 2007 it was estimated that roughly the $600M brought in through these royalties reduced Quebec's per capita transfers of -$0.38.
Generally speaking, equalization let's not forget is about fiscal capacity, the amount of money that's "out there" in a province and that can be tapped into. Even with the downturn in oil, and including hydro for the hydro rich provinces like Quebec and Manitoba, their GDP per capita and other wealth measures are still lower than Alberta's and Newfoundland"s.

I highly doubt that organizations like the OECD or even StatsCan exclude "hydro" from economic output stats.
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  #2108  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Rollerstud98 View Post
Maybe not direct money out of their hand but yes you did receive federal assistance through transfer payments
What do you mean by "transfer payments"? Every province receives transfer payments, pretty much relative to population. Not the same as equalization.
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  #2109  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 2:42 PM
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Originally Posted by GreaterMontréal View Post
The unemployment rate on the Island of Montréal has not been this low since 1987. 7.3%
Quebec is leading in jobs creation since at least 2015. and leads in private sector jobs
I'm not sure whether it is Quebec or B.C. that has been "leading" but, in Quebec's case, have you seen any analysis of why things seem to be going so well in that regard? Is it related in any way to the provincial government getting finances under control, finally? Low hydro rates? A combination of factors? Happenstance?
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  #2110  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 2:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Generally speaking, equalization let's not forget is about fiscal capacity, the amount of money that's "out there" in a province and that can be tapped into. Even with the downturn in oil, and including hydro for the hydro rich provinces like Quebec and Manitoba, their GDP per capita and other wealth measures are still lower than Alberta's and Newfoundland"s.

I highly doubt that organizations like the OECD or even StatsCan exclude "hydro" from economic output stats.
Perhaps the problem with equalization isn't Quebec's neediness, but rather Alberta's inordinate wealth. I feel like a light has gone on in my head!
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  #2111  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 5:56 PM
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Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
I still wonder why Atlantic Canada is struggling so badly to create jobs compared to, say, Toronto or Vancouver. They are the lowest price jurisdiction in Canada by quite a wide margin and taxes aren't exceptionally high compared to Quebec, Ontario or some US states. Is distance the big killer there?


Taxes are just one incentive for businesses. Give it time. There's more startup news coming out of the area than I can ever remember. This will play big into the coming generation's entrepreneurs on whether to stay or leave.
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  #2112  
Old Posted Jan 8, 2017, 6:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eternallyme View Post
I still wonder why Atlantic Canada is struggling so badly to create jobs compared to, say, Toronto or Vancouver. They are the lowest price jurisdiction in Canada by quite a wide margin and taxes aren't exceptionally high compared to Quebec, Ontario or some US states. Is distance the big killer there?
They are low-cost precisely because they aren't growing. High costs mean the area is desirable. This is why the GTA has the vast bulk of job creation in Ontario despite being by far the highest cost region of the province; and why California has the most private investment in North America, despite California having the highest business taxes in North America.
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  #2113  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 5:44 AM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
I'm not sure whether it is Quebec or B.C. that has been "leading" but, in Quebec's case, have you seen any analysis of why things seem to be going so well in that regard? Is it related in any way to the provincial government getting finances under control, finally? Low hydro rates? A combination of factors? Happenstance?
My views:

I have travelled to all provinces and can speak French so I think I may know why...

The balanced budgets and and low hydro rates certainly help but I would say there is much more to it.

There has been stability in Quebec now that a federalist party has been in power at the National Assembly since 2003 (with the exception of the very short minority Marois PQ government) Also, the Bloc Quebecois hasn't been an official party in our federal parliament since 2011. Polls are showing support for sovereignty on average at only between 30-35% and some more recent ones are showing that support is still falling. So the separation threat is not scaring businesses which means more investment.

Don't forget that Quebec lost a lot of its economic power and scared businesses away when there were threats of separation and changes that made many uncomfortable. Now with much of the threat gone, Quebec is actually seen as being a very stable society.

Some other things that play a large roll:

-current provincial government is very pro-business

-Quebeckers are known for being very reliable and honest (and action was taken concerning corruption) and businesses have an easier time finding good employees. The population is very well educated in general.

-a very safe place to live and to own a business (very low crime rates and fewer problems with poverty compared to elsewhere in Canada, also fewer problems with vandalism)

-Quebec is the best place in Canada for entrepreneurs in retail and restaurants. You should see how well they promote their products!

-strong regional identities within the province (the regions do an amazingly good job of attracting and promoting business) A lot of Quebeckers today identify more with the region they live in rather than just being Quebecois. It really helps with brands, advertising, etc.

-Quebec leads in hospitality and service. I've travelled to all provinces and vouch for that. It's not just friendliness that they are good at but also resolving issues and doing it without complaining.

-infrastructure has seen major improvement over the last decade

-most people are socially liberal and don't have grudges against others
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  #2114  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 7:05 AM
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
I'm not sure whether it is Quebec or B.C. that has been "leading" but, in Quebec's case, have you seen any analysis of why things seem to be going so well in that regard? Is it related in any way to the provincial government getting finances under control, finally? Low hydro rates? A combination of factors? Happenstance?
It's easy man: because QC is so cool! If you have to live in Canada, why would you want to live anywhere else?
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  #2115  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 8:41 AM
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It's easy man: because QC is so cool! If you have to live in Canada, why would you want to live anywhere else?
*Cringes violently*

Let the shitstorm begin!
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  #2116  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 8:57 AM
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*Cringes violently*

Let the shitstorm begin!
Hey I lived in Hali and I miss it every day of my life. I miss NS totally and completely. I always want to go back, but you can have multiple misstresses..
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  #2117  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2017, 1:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
My views:

I have travelled to all provinces and can speak French so I think I may know why...

The balanced budgets and and low hydro rates certainly help but I would say there is much more to it.

There has been stability in Quebec now that a federalist party has been in power at the National Assembly since 2003 (with the exception of the very short minority Marois PQ government) Also, the Bloc Quebecois hasn't been an official party in our federal parliament since 2011. Polls are showing support for sovereignty on average at only between 30-35% and some more recent ones are showing that support is still falling. So the separation threat is not scaring businesses which means more investment.

Don't forget that Quebec lost a lot of its economic power and scared businesses away when there were threats of separation and changes that made many uncomfortable. Now with much of the threat gone, Quebec is actually seen as being a very stable society.

Some other things that play a large roll:

-current provincial government is very pro-business

-Quebeckers are known for being very reliable and honest (and action was taken concerning corruption) and businesses have an easier time finding good employees. The population is very well educated in general.

-a very safe place to live and to own a business (very low crime rates and fewer problems with poverty compared to elsewhere in Canada, also fewer problems with vandalism)

-Quebec is the best place in Canada for entrepreneurs in retail and restaurants. You should see how well they promote their products!

-strong regional identities within the province (the regions do an amazingly good job of attracting and promoting business) A lot of Quebeckers today identify more with the region they live in rather than just being Quebecois. It really helps with brands, advertising, etc.

-Quebec leads in hospitality and service. I've travelled to all provinces and vouch for that. It's not just friendliness that they are good at but also resolving issues and doing it without complaining.

-infrastructure has seen major improvement over the last decade

-most people are socially liberal and don't have grudges against others
The current situation (dollar, etc.) favours provinces that have large portions of their economies devoted to diverse trade with the U.S., especially finished products. So Ontario, Quebec and also to some degree B.C.

One reason Quebec might be outperforming Ontario is the perceived business climate in the province.

The Couillard government is extremely unpopular in the general populace in Quebec, but it is very well-liked by the business community and élites. Certainly much more than any Quebec government in living memory.

Whereas in Ontario the Wynne Liberals are seemingly disliked by everyone, from business leaders to average joes.
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  #2118  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 12:29 AM
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Originally Posted by OutOfTowner View Post
Hey I lived in Hali and I miss it every day of my life. I miss NS totally and completely. I always want to go back, but you can have multiple misstresses..
And the have to live in Canada part?

I think you meant, if you hit the citizenship lottery jackpot and got to live in Canada.
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  #2119  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 12:43 AM
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And the have to live in Canada part?

I think you meant, if you hit the citizenship lottery jackpot and got to live in Canada.
I'm happy to live in Canada (obviously, since I do) but it's not the only country in the world. There are at least a dozen or so other lotteries I could have won. I'd love to give Germany another, longer go. Berlin, specifically.
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  #2120  
Old Posted Jan 10, 2017, 12:49 AM
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Originally Posted by OutOfTowner View Post
I'm happy to live in Canada (obviously, since I do) but it's not the only country in the world. There are at least a dozen or so other lotteries I could have won. I'd love to give Germany another, longer go. Berlin, specifically.
Europe has lots of nice countries (UK, Germany, Netherlands, etc.). They're terrific to visit or for temporary stays. To live long term Canada's the best country in the world imo. I'm a dual Canadian/UK citizen. If I had to I'd give up my UK passport but I'd never give up my Canadian passport for anything.
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