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  #8861  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 12:13 AM
Corndogger Corndogger is offline
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Originally Posted by Monolith View Post
I doubt many, as it can't pollute the ocean after an accident.
But it can pollute the rivers and destroy much more than any tanker spill ever would. But that's not part of the protest points given to them so they remain ignorant about bigger problems.
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  #8862  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 12:28 AM
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We have 100 years of hydro dam history and our rivers are very clean. Never even heard of dam pollution.
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  #8863  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 12:37 AM
Doug Doug is offline
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Originally Posted by Denscity View Post
We have 100 years of hydro dam history and our rivers are very clean. Never even heard of dam pollution.
Look a bit south. The slag dumped in Trail has accumulated being Grand Coulee.

Or to the far north where the Bennett Dam contaminated the Peace with methy mercury.

Last edited by Doug; Jun 22, 2018 at 2:26 AM.
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  #8864  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 2:11 AM
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Look a bit south. The slag dumped in Trail has accumulated being Grand Coulee.

Or to the far north where the Bennett Dam contained the Peace with methy mercury.
The slag dumped in trail is nothing to do with a dam
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  #8865  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 2:25 AM
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Originally Posted by libtard View Post
The slag dumped in trail is nothing to do with a dam
Dams trap sediment. Toxins concentrate as the sediment accumulates. The former Milltown Dam on the Clark Fork had a similar problem. Eventually all dams incur clean up costs to deal with sediment even if the sediment isn't particularly toxic. Dams like the O Shaunessy on the Tuolumne trap less sediment as their watersheds are mostly granite. The Glen Canyon silts up much faster as the Colorado drains easily eroded sandstone.
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  #8866  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 3:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Doug View Post
Dams trap sediment. Toxins concentrate as the sediment accumulates. The former Milltown Dam on the Clark Fork had a similar problem. Eventually all dams incur clean up costs to deal with sediment even if the sediment isn't particularly toxic. Dams like the O Shaunessy on the Tuolumne trap less sediment as their watersheds are mostly granite. The Glen Canyon silts up much faster as the Colorado drains easily eroded sandstone.
Are you somehow trying to equate generating stations to the oil sands in terms of environmental damage? If so that's pathetic
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  #8867  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 1:09 PM
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No insider info, just a keen observer. A few friends who may want o buy a brewery on the cheap. And yes, good, interesting ones will succeed. Right now at least it is pretty hard to fail - one brewery continued to churn out products after their second batch went to skunk and didn't find the problem for like 6 months. I do think the industry is reaching a consolidation phase; where a breweries with a small location but great product will buy out or merge with brewery with bad product but lots of potential to expand (giving the big one an exit and the small one easy expansion).

A big problem for Alberta is the different processes that make it impossible to get Alberta product onto shelves in other provinces. Whether it is restrictions on local products only in corner stores (Quebec), restrictions on local products only in grocery stores (Ontario), but the big one is universal product mixes in monopoly stores, requiring massive volumes to supply every store versus a competitor who can ship one skid to supply 5 stores in Alberta. Even if the product mix is different, some provinces require such a large supply to be held in their warehouse; it destroys the economics of supplying to them (the time value of money and all).
Interesting, thanks.

What's needed, of course, is a full liberalization of all trade between the provinces. Which would have to be implemented federally as the provinces are incapable of doing the right thing on this matter on their own, preferring byzantine systems in 10 different jurisdictions.

But I now understand that is forbidden by convention in Canada, as mandating free trade within a country (despite it explicitly being called for in the constitution), would apparently be federal overreach. Let's all be poorer instead.
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  #8868  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 3:44 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is online now
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Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Work around, or followed the required process despite the time and money that entailed?
Every brewery that wants to sell in Quebec being required to build an independent warehouse, because the SAQ process is broken, is rather ridiculous. That is not the sign of something working.
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  #8869  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 3:46 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is online now
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Originally Posted by Doug View Post
Look a bit south. The slag dumped in Trail has accumulated being Grand Coulee.

Or to the far north where the Bennett Dam contaminated the Peace with methy mercury.
The Bennett Dam also caused a localized famine in northern Alberta Indigenous communities, and destroyed much of the wetlands along the river downstream.
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  #8870  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 3:46 PM
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Every brewery that wants to sell in Quebec being required to build an independent warehouse, because the SAQ process is broken, is rather ridiculous. That is not the sign of something working.
So Beau's built a warehouse?
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  #8871  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 3:47 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is online now
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So Beau's built a warehouse?
Yes, according to the article.
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  #8872  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 3:56 PM
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Beau's has been extremely aggressive about expansion and has a fair amount of financial backing - it's probably the second largest independent brewery in Ontario (after Steamwhistle). Unfortunately not all breweries have that option. I suppose that is why Collective Arts doesn't sell in Quebec (or BC) but is all over the NE United States now.
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  #8873  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 6:52 PM
Doug Doug is offline
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Are you somehow trying to equate generating stations to the oil sands in terms of environmental damage? If so that's pathetic
I attempted to raise facts, not bait a climate change troll.
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  #8874  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 8:13 PM
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I attempted to raise facts, not bait a climate change troll.
Tailings ponds
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  #8875  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 9:04 PM
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A perfect learning opportunity for Libtard!

Environmental Impacts of Dams

https://www.internationalrivers.org/...mpacts-of-dams

The environmental consequences of large dams are numerous and varied, and includes direct impacts to the biological, chemical and physical properties of rivers and riparian (or "stream-side") environments.

The dam wall itself blocks fish migrations, which in some cases and with some species completely separate spawning habitats from rearing habitats. The dam also traps sediments, which are critical for maintaining physical processes and habitats downstream of the dam (include the maintenance of productive deltas, barrier islands, fertile floodplains and coastal wetlands).
Another significant and obvious impact is the transformation upstream of the dam from a free-flowing river ecosystem to an artificial slack-water reservoir habitat. Changes in temperature, chemical composition, dissolved oxygen levels and the physical properties of a reservoir are often not suitable to the aquatic plants and animals that evolved with a given river system. Indeed, reservoirs often host non-native and invasive species (e.g. snails, algae, predatory fish) that further undermine the river's natural communities of plants and animals.
The alteration of a river's flow and sediment transport downstream of a dam often causes the greatest sustained environmental impacts. Life in and around a river evolves and is conditioned on the timing and quantities of river flow. Disrupted and altered water flows can be as severe as completely de-watering river reaches and the life they contain. Yet even subtle changes in the quantity and timing of water flows impact aquatic and riparian life, which can unravel the ecological web of a river system.
A dam also holds back sediments that would naturally replenish downstream ecosystems. When a river is deprived of its sediment load, it seeks to recapture it by eroding the downstream river bed and banks (which can undermine bridges and other riverbank structures, as well as riverside woodlands). Riverbeds downstream of dams are typically eroded by several meters within the decade of first closing a dam; the damage can extend for tens or even hundreds of kilometers below a dam.

Riverbed deepening (or "incising") will also lower groundwater tables along a river, lowering the water table accessible to plant roots (and to human communities drawing water from wells) . Altering the riverbed also reduces habitat for fish that spawn in river bottoms, and for invertebrates.
In aggregate, dammed rivers have also impacted processes in the broader biosphere. Most reservoirs, especially those in the tropics, are significant contributors to greenhouse gas emissions (a recent study pegged global greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs on par with that of the aviation industry, about 4% of human-caused GHG emissions). Recent studies on the Congo River have demonstrated that the sediment and nutrient flow from the Congo drives biological processes far into the Atlantic Ocean, including serving as a carbon sink for atmospheric greenhouse gases.
Large dams have led to the extinction of many fish and other aquatic species, the disappearance of birds in floodplains, huge losses of forest, wetland and farmland, erosion of coastal deltas, and many other unmitigable impacts.
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  #8876  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 10:11 PM
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Dams aren't nearly as green as they're sold to be. They are carbon-friendly, but not exactly friendly about other topics.

Nuclear is actually arguably the best form of power; it's clean, safe, minimal environment impact if properly managed, and generates a huge amount of power at all times. As opposed to fossil fuel plants (carbon emissions & pollution; though natural gas is a lot better than coal), wind/solar (insufficient yield and inconsistent output), or hydroelectric (high costs AND significant environmental damage).

IMO, Alberta should have built a nuclear power plant in the oil sands region to power the operations up there. Would have been an elegant way to minimize the carbon impact of the operation.
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  #8877  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 10:18 PM
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Trump's lumber tariffs make home ownership too expensive for more than a million Americans

U.S. duties on softwood lumber causing spike in housing prices, record profits for big Canadian producers

Katie Simpson · CBC News

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/us-...mber-1.4712160
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  #8878  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 10:26 PM
MalcolmTucker MalcolmTucker is online now
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Originally Posted by 1overcosc View Post
Dams aren't nearly as green as they're sold to be. They are carbon-friendly, but not exactly friendly about other topics.

Nuclear is actually arguably the best form of power; it's clean, safe, minimal environment impact if properly managed, and generates a huge amount of power at all times. As opposed to fossil fuel plants (carbon emissions & pollution; though natural gas is a lot better than coal), wind/solar (insufficient yield and inconsistent output), or hydroelectric (high costs AND significant environmental damage).

IMO, Alberta should have built a nuclear power plant in the oil sands region to power the operations up there. Would have been an elegant way to minimize the carbon impact of the operation.
Until the natural gas price collapse, there were proposals for one 4 reactor site, and I believe another less advanced project in Alberta.



After that, natural gas was just so cheap, the carbon cost would have had to be super high (like $200 high) to make it worth it.
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  #8879  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Hackslack View Post
A perfect learning opportunity for Libtard!

Environmental Impacts of Dams

https://www.internationalrivers.org/...mpacts-of-dams

The environmental consequences of large dams are numerous and varied, and includes direct impacts to the biological, chemical and physical properties of rivers and riparian (or "stream-side") environments.

The dam wall itself blocks fish migrations, which in some cases and with some species completely separate spawning habitats from rearing habitats. The dam also traps sediments, which are critical for maintaining physical processes and habitats downstream of the dam (include the maintenance of productive deltas, barrier islands, fertile floodplains and coastal wetlands).
Another significant and obvious impact is the transformation upstream of the dam from a free-flowing river ecosystem to an artificial slack-water reservoir habitat. Changes in temperature, chemical composition, dissolved oxygen levels and the physical properties of a reservoir are often not suitable to the aquatic plants and animals that evolved with a given river system. Indeed, reservoirs often host non-native and invasive species (e.g. snails, algae, predatory fish) that further undermine the river's natural communities of plants and animals.
The alteration of a river's flow and sediment transport downstream of a dam often causes the greatest sustained environmental impacts. Life in and around a river evolves and is conditioned on the timing and quantities of river flow. Disrupted and altered water flows can be as severe as completely de-watering river reaches and the life they contain. Yet even subtle changes in the quantity and timing of water flows impact aquatic and riparian life, which can unravel the ecological web of a river system.
A dam also holds back sediments that would naturally replenish downstream ecosystems. When a river is deprived of its sediment load, it seeks to recapture it by eroding the downstream river bed and banks (which can undermine bridges and other riverbank structures, as well as riverside woodlands). Riverbeds downstream of dams are typically eroded by several meters within the decade of first closing a dam; the damage can extend for tens or even hundreds of kilometers below a dam.

Riverbed deepening (or "incising") will also lower groundwater tables along a river, lowering the water table accessible to plant roots (and to human communities drawing water from wells) . Altering the riverbed also reduces habitat for fish that spawn in river bottoms, and for invertebrates.
In aggregate, dammed rivers have also impacted processes in the broader biosphere. Most reservoirs, especially those in the tropics, are significant contributors to greenhouse gas emissions (a recent study pegged global greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs on par with that of the aviation industry, about 4% of human-caused GHG emissions). Recent studies on the Congo River have demonstrated that the sediment and nutrient flow from the Congo drives biological processes far into the Atlantic Ocean, including serving as a carbon sink for atmospheric greenhouse gases.
Large dams have led to the extinction of many fish and other aquatic species, the disappearance of birds in floodplains, huge losses of forest, wetland and farmland, erosion of coastal deltas, and many other unmitigable impacts.
No one is arguing that dams destroy fish habitat. But they don't completely poison the rivers like the oil sands have done to the Athabasca and countless other rivers and wetlands
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  #8880  
Old Posted Jun 22, 2018, 11:59 PM
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Oil sands developments have increased cancer rates in many First Nation communities along the athabasca river. Do you confirm or deny this, Albertans? Simple yes or no will do
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