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  #201  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2017, 7:43 PM
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Where is the $$? Still vaporware til that is lined up.

Easiest/best route for HSR in the country tho except for it being in Texas
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  #202  
Old Posted Dec 18, 2017, 7:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Eightball View Post
Where is the $$? Still vaporware til that is lined up.

Easiest/best route for HSR in the country tho except for it being in Texas
This is a private project. It's being privately funded. Yes, there will be government cooperation on certain things, but it's not a state agency project like the California high speed rail project.
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  #203  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2017, 1:01 PM
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Yeah but they don't have any money at the moment and have been talking about this for decades with no movement
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  #204  
Old Posted Dec 19, 2017, 2:52 PM
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Yeah but they don't have any money at the moment and have been talking about this for decades with no movement
That's not quite truthful. They have raised the money to pay for the legally required environmental studies, and pay for the required pubic meetings about them.
It's difficult to sell securities for projects without the necessary government paperwork and permits approved. Even Brightline has faced the same difficulties before the permits are issued, yet seem to be able to sell the securities to build the sections of the rail corridor once the permits are in place. I don't expect Texas Central or anyone else to do better on that front. You have to first get all the foundations for a building in place before you can build the building.
While the process is slow, Texas Central has been accomplishing things in the proper order, step by step. Only time will tell if they will be successful.
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  #205  
Old Posted Dec 23, 2017, 1:42 AM
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Originally Posted by electricron View Post
That's not quite truthful. They have raised the money to pay for the legally required environmental studies, and pay for the required pubic meetings about them.
It's difficult to sell securities for projects without the necessary government paperwork and permits approved. Even Brightline has faced the same difficulties before the permits are issued, yet seem to be able to sell the securities to build the sections of the rail corridor once the permits are in place. I don't expect Texas Central or anyone else to do better on that front. You have to first get all the foundations for a building in place before you can build the building.
While the process is slow, Texas Central has been accomplishing things in the proper order, step by step. Only time will tell if they will be successful.
This is spot on. And it seems like they're truly gaining steam toward being successful, especially with regard to public attention. People are talking about it more, they want it more, and more folks are seeing the need for it. Of course, this doesn't equal dollars in many cases, but it isn't insignificant. Several landowners (not a majority, however) in between are even beginning to support it due to the benefit of more folks in the state. Good conversations are happening. I'm excited to see how all of this pans out, for sure.
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  #206  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2018, 5:21 PM
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HOUSTON-DALLAS HIGH SPEED TRAIN CLEARS FEDERAL HURDLE

https://www.moderncities.com/article...federal-hurdle

Quote:
.....

- The Texas 'bullet train' cleared a major hurdle with the release of a draft environmental impact statement from the Federal Railroad Administration that identifies a preferred route between Dallas and Houston as well as passenger station locations.

.....



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  #207  
Old Posted Jan 29, 2018, 8:54 PM
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Today Texas Central Partners released renderings and plan maps for the Dallas Station.

Here is the link.

https://www.texascentral.com/2018/01...train-station/
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  #208  
Old Posted Jan 30, 2018, 2:09 PM
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Today Texas Central Partners released renderings and plan maps for the Dallas Station.

Here is the link.

https://www.texascentral.com/2018/01...train-station/
From street level, that new elevated train station will look more like parking garages than anything else because it is surrounded by them.
I really like its location at the hub of Dallas' hub and spoke and wheel freeway system.
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  #209  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2018, 6:01 PM
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As much as I would love to see this...I would ride the hell out of this thing...it seems like a pie in the sky concept that will wind up no where. Like Houston's monorail in the 80's. This is Texas, way too much resistance it will have to go up against Southwest/United/AA which have a load of flights every day and are fairly cheap.
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  #210  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2018, 6:25 PM
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As much as I would love to see this...I would ride the hell out of this thing...it seems like a pie in the sky concept that will wind up no where. Like Houston's monorail in the 80's. This is Texas, way too much resistance it will have to go up against Southwest/United/AA which have a load of flights every day and are fairly cheap.
In all fairness this has come along so much further than we have already anticipated. I think many people there are fed up with living in the 13th century, taking into account the world is growing up around them back there more than many realize, especially here in Asia where high speed rail is common and the norm. Things are changing and it's something the opposition will have to accept. In Texas, they have been able come come a lot farther with this project than it's sister project out in California which has had problems from the get go. I'm sure back in the day when they were building the interstate highways they met their fair share of opposition as well, but got through it.

I don't know anything about the monorail system that was proposed for Houston back in the 1980's, but I'm sure a huge reason that project never got off the ground was that it required at least some degree of public funds to finance it, and as well all know there in Texas practically would have been heresy, at least for transit projects other than roads. This project is completely privately financed from my understanding and at least appears to be smooth sailing all considering. Been keeping track of it and Googling it almost every week for news updates for the last two years and have good vibes here. Now I may be speculating to a degree, but just figured I'd throw in my two cents.

We are all rooting for you all in Texas and that this will show how it's done right.
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  #211  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2018, 11:41 AM
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In Texas, they have been able come come a lot farther with this project than it's sister project out in California which has had problems from the get go.
CAHSR is under construction.

DSC_0034 by California High-Speed Rail, on Flickr

Nothing has broken ground yet in Texas...

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Originally Posted by CHAPINM1 View Post
We are all rooting for you all in Texas and that this will show how it's done right.
Building an HSR line that solely caters to business travelers isn't inherently what should count as "doing it right."

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Originally Posted by CHAPINM1 View Post
This project is completely privately financed from my understanding and at least appears to be smooth sailing all considering.
...they said they'd be under construction by now, when they initially announced the project. Since, that date has continually been pushed back, the cost estimate is still murky, and we've gotten no firm details about their financing (other than the vague notion that there's commitment from a consortium of investors: Bank of Japan, Japanese Gov't, JR, etc).

"Our goal is to complete the financing at some point when the project progresses a little bit further in the approvals process,"
he says. "We hope to be in a position where we
would be under construction by late 2016 or early 2017, and that would allow us to complete and commission
the system in a 2020-2021 period. So the big requirement for financing is going to be during that 2017 to
2020-2021 period."


Look, I'm not starting an argument here. I'm all for this project (although, I still have major concerns with TXCentral's plans).

However, this strange bias that leads us to never discuss this program's shortcomings while insisting CAHSR is a long-shot (even while 80-90% of the trunk-line is fully funded, and under construction!) drives me nuts!
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  #212  
Old Posted Feb 4, 2018, 7:23 PM
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Originally Posted by phoenixboi08 View Post
However, this strange bias that leads us to never discuss this program's shortcomings while insisting CAHSR is a long-shot (even while 80-90% of the trunk-line is fully funded, and under construction!) drives me nuts!
While CHSR construction is already underway in the valley, it's not even close to being fully funded. From CHSR's own website:
http://www.hsr.ca.gov/About/Funding_...ing_plans.html
There's three (3) funding plans implemented to date.
(1) Central Valley Segment Funding Plan
Otherwise known as Segment A.
Projected costs estimated at $7.813 billion for 119 miles
From Proposition 1A $2.609 billion
Matching Federal grants totaling $2.970 billion
State Cap-and-Trade Proceeds totaling $2.234 billion

(2) San Francisco to San Jose Peninsula Corridor Funding Plan
Otherwise known as the Peninsula Corridor Electrification Project (PCEP)
Projected costs estimated at $1.980 billion for 51 miles
Federal funds amounts: (total $977.7 million)
FTA Formula Program Funds $330.7 million
Section 5309 Core Capacity $647 million
State funds amounts: (total $733 million)
From Proposition 1A $600 million
From Cap-and-Trade $113 million
Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program $20 million
From Proposition 1B $8 million
Local funds amounts: (total $261.6 million)
JPB Members $193.2 million
From MTC Bridge Tolls $39.4 million
From BAAQMD $20 million
Caltrain (LCTOP) $9 million

(3) Rosecrans/Marquardt Grade Separation Project Funding Plan
Raises one highway intersection over the railroad tracks (0 miles of track)
Projected costs estimated at $155.3 million
Federal funds amounts ($23.135 million)
US TIGER $15 million
National Highway Freight Program $8.135 million
State funds amounts ($96.665 million)
From Proposition 1A $76.665 million
From Interregional Transportation Improvement Program $7 million
From Section 190 Grade Separation Program $15 million
Local funds amounts ($33.5 million)
Measure R $26.5 million
BNSF $7 million

Total funds dedicated for the CHSR program so far is $9.948 billion for just 170 miles of HSR corridor. The entire HSR system will have over 800 miles of corridor and projected to cost over $64 billion.

Let's do some simple math.
$10 billion/$64 billion = 12.9% funded financially
170 miles/800 miles = 21% funded scope of corridor
That's no where close to being 80-90% funded.

For optimists, a FYI, Proposition 1A authorizes up to $9 billion of funding for CHSR, they have allocated $3.276 billion so far, leaving just $5.724 billion left. They have only spent 36.4% of it so far. That's assuming all $9 billion of Proposition 1A was for CHSR. The remaining $5.724 billion will be quickly consumed as they start construction in the mountains.
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  #213  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2018, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by electricron View Post
While CHSR construction is already underway in the valley, it's not even close to being fully funded.
Revisit what I wrote...
Quote:
(even while 80-90% of the trunk-line is fully funded, and under construction!)
They have enough cash on hand to finish what is essentially the trunk of the HSR network (SAC/SF-LA, and SF/SAC-Anaheim, SF/SAC-SD all rely on that 300+mi trunk in the CV), which is why it is being built first...

The only question is what the cost of the tunnels under Pacheco will cost. Either it's included in the existing construction package 4-5, or they will stop at Gilry in the interim and finish the tunnels to San Jose, afterwards -- having cash inflow from operations will certainly help.
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  #214  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2018, 9:43 PM
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Originally Posted by phoenixboi08 View Post
having cash inflow from operations will certainly help.
There won't be any, "cash inflow from operations" as it will be operating at a loss. Starting operations will only further increase cash OUTFLOWS.
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  #215  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2018, 10:32 PM
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  #216  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2018, 3:30 PM
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I didn't see that rendering of the Dallas terminus. Yikes. It's on an island between railyards and freeways, with only long pedestrian bridges connecting it to the Cedars neighborhood. Literally zero architectural or urban value to this plan. Plus, any connections to local transit would be very unpleasant - a half mile walk to the convention center LRT station, and no connection to TRE if you want to go to Ft Worth (although TRE could easily be extended to the new site).

A smarter scheme would be to build a tall garage in the air rights over the UP tracks, and build a retail concourse through the garage leading to the station platforms. That would basically move the front door of the station into the Cedars neighborhood itself. The parking revenue would still be there plus the retail rents, and the other proposed garage sites could be reserved for future TOD.

You can tell that this developer has no plans to make money off real estate. Contrast this to All Aboard Florida where multiple hotels and highrises are planned along the route, and the Miami terminus is seamlessly integrated into the city.

Honestly the best thing that could happen right now is that Sears goes out of business, and their enormous distribution center in the Cedars becomes available. The station could be moved to the north/east side of the UP tracks where it could also seamlessly integrate with the neighborhood, and with many acres of TOD.

The Houston plan is just in a shitty location, but understandably Texas Central could not negotiate right-of-way to get to a more centralized location in the city. The site has no connection to local transit but could eventually host significant TOD (admittedly as a suburban node) and if/when access to downtown Houston is secured, it could work as a convenient suburban station that reduces the need to find parking options near the downtown station.
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  #217  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2018, 8:47 PM
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Originally Posted by electricron View Post
For optimists, a FYI, Proposition 1A authorizes up to $9 billion of funding for CHSR, they have allocated $3.276 billion so far, leaving just $5.724 billion left. They have only spent 36.4% of it so far. That's assuming all $9 billion of Proposition 1A was for CHSR. The remaining $5.724 billion will be quickly consumed as they start construction in the mountains.
I know this is off-topic but the Texans keep introducing the comparisons so whewn they are wrong they need to be corrected.

Correct: CAHSR isn't FULLY funded.

Incorrect: Prop 1A funding is the only firm funding.

Quote:
California bullet train deal: Hundreds of millions of dollars
By CHRIS MEGERIAN
JUN 12, 2014 | 8:48 PM
| SACRAMENTO

California's controversial bullet train would receive hundreds of millions of dollars in the coming year under a budget deal reached by Gov. Jerry Brown and lawmakers . . . .

The money would be drawn from the cap-and-trade program, which charges fees to polluters who emit greenhouse gases above certain limits. Under the budget deal, $250 million would be allocated to high-speed rail in the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. In each following year, the bullet train would receive 25% of cap-and-trade revenue . . . .

Cap-and-trade could provide billions of dollars for the bullet train over the next several years, a relatively small chunk of the project's overall $68-billion price tag. However, the money would arrive at a critical time . . . .
http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-p...613-story.html
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  #218  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2018, 6:26 PM
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Speaking of Texas, what happened to the DART thread ? No interest ?
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  #219  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2018, 4:06 AM
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It's hilarious how Elon Musk and other hucksters have tricked the public into thinking the California HSR project disappeared when in fact it is very much under construction. Besides, California HSR and Texas HSR have virtually nothing in common.

As a private for-profit venture, Texas HSR offers no ancillary benefits to other Texas rail services or freight rail. By contrast, California HSR loosely parallels existing freight tracks through the Central Valley, and nearly all freight grade crossings on a 100+ mile stretch are being eliminated as part of the HSR project. Also, both SF and LA commuter rail will experience significant physical and service upgrades as part of HSR.

California HSR is serving the actual downtowns of San Francisco and LA, and interchange directly with the hubs of their rapid transit/light rail systems. Texas HSR will not terminate in either downtown and so won't encourage significant public transportation use. Therefore existing public services will not receive a boost.

Texas HSR will not directly serve any intermediate towns whereas California HSR will transform the state's Central Valley. By the 2030s, Fresno and Bakersfield will enjoy very fast and convenient rail service to downtown SF and LA, as well as San Jose and SFO.
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  #220  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2018, 6:53 PM
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As an aside: Musk is the man. I was gobsmacked when he did what NASA couldn't do in decades - land a rocket vertically. But he wasn't through. Oh, no! He figured out a way to land rocket boosters vertically!
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