HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Portland > Downtown & City of Portland

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #41  
Old Posted Aug 24, 2016, 7:54 PM
maccoinnich maccoinnich is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Portland
Posts: 6,062
This is scheduled before the Design Commission tomorrow, but there are no drawings up online yet.
__________________
"Maybe to an architect, they might look suspicious, but to me, they just look like rocks"

www.twitter.com/maccoinnich
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #42  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2016, 7:10 PM
Rhome's Avatar
Rhome Rhome is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 67
DAR Submission (obtained from the Goose Hollow neighborhood website):
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #43  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2016, 3:23 AM
Derek's Avatar
Derek Derek is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,431
__________________
Portlandia
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #44  
Old Posted Aug 26, 2016, 7:16 PM
2oh1's Avatar
2oh1 2oh1 is offline
9-7-2oh1-!
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: downtown Portland
Posts: 2,219
I have high hopes for this one! GBD did two of my favorite recent projects here: The Pearl West building, and Hassalo On Eighth.

The word "transform" is so overused in development. Almost every project seems to claim it will transform a neighborhood, but this is a case where that would be true and then some. I've been dreaming of a day when those awful Oregonian bunkers would be torn out. Replacing that dead zone with something like this would be fantastic!!!

I'm not sure which direction I hope the tower faces. They show both options on that PDF. If it ends up going north to south, it'll block more of the noise from Providence Park, but if it stretches from east to west, it'll block less of the downtown view from Goose Hollow.

Either way, I'll be thrilled. Build, baby, BUILD!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #45  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2016, 1:52 PM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 686
I've heard from the architects that they would like the primary face of the development to front onto Yamhill, which is the light rail side of the project. This makes sense since thats the only consistent frontage for both the full and half block sites.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #46  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2016, 9:09 PM
urbanlife's Avatar
urbanlife urbanlife is offline
A before E
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Milwaukie, Oregon
Posts: 10,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhome View Post
DAR Submission (obtained from the Goose Hollow neighborhood website):
This building will probably look fairly mediocre when it is built, but I really like this drawing....not sure if it was by hand or not, but it looks good.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #47  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2016, 12:48 AM
tworivers's Avatar
tworivers tworivers is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Portland/Cascadia
Posts: 2,504
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife View Post
This building will probably look fairly mediocre when it is built...
Why?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #48  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2016, 5:16 PM
Orlando's Avatar
Orlando Orlando is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,845
I like this project overall, but that is a poor translation of the newspaper concept.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #49  
Old Posted Aug 28, 2016, 8:12 PM
urbanlife's Avatar
urbanlife urbanlife is offline
A before E
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Milwaukie, Oregon
Posts: 10,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by tworivers View Post
Why?
It just looks like a standard rectangle building. Nothing really stands out with it to me yet. Maybe that will change the closer we get to the actual building being built. Though the hand drawing look does look cool.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #50  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2016, 3:00 PM
cab cab is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,447
Slab buildings with limited balconies are horrible. Just a big wall.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2016, 7:19 PM
AcmeGreg AcmeGreg is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by cab View Post
Slab buildings with limited balconies are horrible. Just a big wall.
If it's going to be a big slab they should at least make the surface visually interesting. Perhaps organize the facade such that it references the history and tradecraft of the site (newspaper printing) by creating the curtain wall from a tiny grid of square glass panels which would be tinted at different values, arranged to create a giant halftone image of Tom McCall's face. You could also apply different levels of reflectivity to certain panels in order to create entirely different images depending on ambient light conditions. Vera Katz's beaming countenance might appear on sunny summer days, while gloomy and overcast weather could summon up the melancholic visage of Neil Goldschmidt. Imagine those two faces bouncing back and forth on one of our active weather days during the fall or spring!

I'm thinking Skylab might be the perfect choice for this type of concept, given that their recent experience re the Yard has no doubt made them experts in the area of reflective glass.

Just a thought.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #52  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2016, 10:38 PM
babs babs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcmeGreg View Post
If it's going to be a big slab they should at least make the surface visually interesting. Perhaps organize the facade such that it references the history and tradecraft of the site (newspaper printing) by creating the curtain wall from a tiny grid of square glass panels which would be tinted at different values, arranged to create a giant halftone image of Tom McCall's face. You could also apply different levels of reflectivity to certain panels in order to create entirely different images depending on ambient light conditions. Vera Katz's beaming countenance might appear on sunny summer days, while gloomy and overcast weather could summon up the melancholic visage of Neil Goldschmidt. Imagine those two faces bouncing back and forth on one of our active weather days during the fall or spring!

I'm thinking Skylab might be the perfect choice for this type of concept, given that their recent experience re the Yard has no doubt made them experts in the area of reflective glass.

Just a thought.
I'd actually like to see a unique facade facing Providence Park side. Perhaps it's some digital signage that changes with the events going on. Perhaps it's rooftop seating for games. I'd just like something to take advantage of this unique perspective.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #53  
Old Posted Sep 6, 2016, 5:28 PM
Photogeric Photogeric is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 285
Make the roof have a step down section facing the stadium and put row seats there!!!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #54  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2016, 9:59 PM
maccoinnich maccoinnich is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Portland
Posts: 6,062
Quote:
GBD Architects and Mithun draw up three new buildings for Goose Hollow



Directly east of Providence Park sits two former Oregonian newspaper buildings, currently squat, concrete, windowless slabs that now look to be replaced with what could be one of the tallest buildings in the city, pending approval.

Representatives from the Goose Hollow Foothills League Neighborhood Association strongly oppose the height and came to the city’s Design Commission advice meeting in late August to testify, as designs are in the early stages and have options at this point.

The plans currently point to demolishing the two Oregonian buildings on the 1.5 block site, replacing them with three new buildings of different scales and massings.

Plans for a full-block development at 1621 S.W. Taylor St. are currently fluid, and could optionally become a 20-story and a six-story mixed-use apartment buildings, or become 30-floors and four-floors of mixed-use apartments — and would be among the tallest in the city.
...continues at the Business Tribune.
__________________
"Maybe to an architect, they might look suspicious, but to me, they just look like rocks"

www.twitter.com/maccoinnich
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #55  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2016, 10:48 PM
innovativethinking innovativethinking is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 591
I don't get what it is with these citizens of Portland that is soooo scared of tall buildings. Just up north in Seattle they have tons of buildings approved that just even one in Portland would be groundbreaking for us.

I mean check out the Seattle thread. I was shocked how many 40 plus story towers are approved and ready for construction there.

I wish we can stop being a "Boise, Idaho" and more like a Seattle or Vancouver Bc. We have 200,000 estimated ppl moving here in the next 15 plus years. We need to absorb these numbers.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #56  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2016, 11:29 PM
58rhodes 58rhodes is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 393
Quote:
Originally Posted by innovativethinking View Post
I don't get what it is with these citizens of Portland that is soooo scared of tall buildings. Just up north in Seattle they have tons of buildings approved that just even one in Portland would be groundbreaking for us.

I mean check out the Seattle thread. I was shocked how many 40 plus story towers are approved and ready for construction there.

I wish we can stop being a "Boise, Idaho" and more like a Seattle or Vancouver Bc. We have 200,000 estimated ppl moving here in the next 15 plus years. We need to absorb these numbers.
There was a time when Seattle and Portland were not that far apart business wise, however those days are over for now and only time will tell which city fairs better because of it. Also keep in mind that Seattle is much more locked in to a smaller space. I think Seattle's density is a tad under 8000-ppsm and Portland is around 4200 ppsm.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #57  
Old Posted Sep 12, 2016, 11:32 PM
Rhome's Avatar
Rhome Rhome is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 67
Quote:
We have 200,000 estimated ppl moving here in the next 15 plus years. We need to absorb these numbers.
FAR (i.e. building volume) dictates how many people you can house, not height. Unless you increase available FAR for a project, you are not going to squeeze more people into a taller (and necessarily thinner) building.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #58  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2016, 1:06 AM
Tykendo Tykendo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by innovativethinking View Post
I don't get what it is with these citizens of Portland that is soooo scared of tall buildings. Just up north in Seattle they have tons of buildings approved that just even one in Portland would be groundbreaking for us.

I mean check out the Seattle thread. I was shocked how many 40 plus story towers are approved and ready for construction there.

I wish we can stop being a "Boise, Idaho" and more like a Seattle or Vancouver Bc. We have 200,000 estimated ppl moving here in the next 15 plus years. We need to absorb these numbers.
Totally agree. It's ridiculous. PDX is moving forward. If they don't like progress, and the jobs it brings, move to the burbs, or better yet, Mayberry RFD.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #59  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2016, 4:02 AM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 686
i think the article is a bit sensational. is 20 stories among the city's tallest? no. there are buildings from the 60s quite a bit taller. and there are some buildings in Goose Hollow near Burnside that appear to me to as tall, if not taller.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #60  
Old Posted Sep 13, 2016, 4:22 AM
DMH DMH is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Portland (part-time); warm foreign countries (part-time)
Posts: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by 58rhodes View Post
There was a time when Seattle and Portland were not that far apart business wise, however those days are over for now and only time will tell which city fairs better because of it. Also keep in mind that Seattle is much more locked in to a smaller space. I think Seattle's density is a tad under 8000-ppsm and Portland is around 4200 ppsm.
I am not confident that your density figures are correct. In the following Huffington Post piece about density using 2010 Census Data, Portland had a density of 3528 ppsm, and Seattle had a density of 3028 ppsm. Yes. Seattle was less dense.

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5888424

Could there have been that much greater population growth in Seattle during the past 6 years?

Seems doubtful.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > Portland > Downtown & City of Portland
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:42 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.