HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #61  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 3:24 PM
Centropolis's Avatar
Centropolis Centropolis is offline
crisis actor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: poodle ranch
Posts: 8,808

https://www.census.gov

the situation in wyoming notwithstanding, the map shows how the interior northwest and intermountain west is where the future growth is going to be.

i do always wonder why new mexico lags behind the others.
__________________
t h e r e is no C h a o s.... . . . only g r e a t E n e r g y
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #62  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 3:34 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: New Jersey - Somerset County
Posts: 23,020
Quote:
Originally Posted by CIA View Post
Hudson County and Newark) were strongly growing at last report.

There could be major troubles for upstate NY and central and south NJ.
I could see Vineland and Atlantic County see a decline. The area around Trenton and Camden might continue to grow but at a slow rate. As a proxy to Philly, you'd think it would grow much faster due to the generally low prices relative to lets say Hunterdon County or the areas near Princeton. I attribute horrid schools and crime for the stagnation.

Central NJ is expensive, and growth out in the burbs (where I'm at) is very slow. Places like Plainfield might account for most of the growth. There is a heavy Hispanic population in Plainfield. There have been some apartments built near the rail lines, but not much really going on in Somerset County.



Essex and Hudson County is where the action is at. Also with Edison, Middlesex is up there. Although Edison NJ is a hellhole. Horribly planned and text book definition of urban sprawl.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #63  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 3:39 PM
SteveD's Avatar
SteveD SteveD is offline
Back on the road again
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: East Atlanta Village
Posts: 1,898
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post

https://www.census.gov

the situation in wyoming notwithstanding, the map shows how the interior northwest and intermountain west is where the future growth is going to be.

i do always wonder why new mexico lags behind the others.
Not really. It's easy for those sparsely populated states to rack up big growth rates due to the small base, but the biggest numerical growth has been and is likely to continue to be the Atlantic southeast, southwest, and west coast.
__________________
Maybe Martians could do better than we've done
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #64  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 3:41 PM
Centropolis's Avatar
Centropolis Centropolis is offline
crisis actor
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: poodle ranch
Posts: 8,808
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveD View Post
Not really. It's easy for those sparsely populated states to rack up big growth rates due to the small base, but the biggest numerical growth has been and is likely to continue to be the Atlantic southeast, southwest, and west coast.
true. i think its going to be an ever increasing trend, though.
__________________
t h e r e is no C h a o s.... . . . only g r e a t E n e r g y
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #65  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 4:15 PM
Sun Belt Sun Belt is online now
'Sunny'
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Sunshine and Shorts
Posts: 1,832
^I can see Salt Lake City giving Denver a run for it's money. Also, Boise seems poised for some high growth decades ahead of it. They both offer the western lifestyle, but at a fraction of the cost of places like Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #66  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 4:44 PM
BG918's Avatar
BG918 BG918 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 2,821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centropolis View Post
the situation in wyoming notwithstanding, the map shows how the interior northwest and intermountain west is where the future growth is going to be.

i do always wonder why new mexico lags behind the others.
New Mexico and Wyoming lack diverse economies that can drive growth outside of oil/gas/mining. Albuquerque has potential to grow into more of a hub in the future but does not currently have a very dynamic economy and NM is overall one of the poorer states in the country. Wyoming is just very rural, only 585,000 people live in the entire state! The city proper of Denver has more people than the entire state of Wyoming which is the 10th largest state by area.

I agree Boise and Salt Lake City are likely the next growth magnets in the western region.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #67  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 6:19 PM
subterranean's Avatar
subterranean subterranean is offline
homesick alien
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Portland
Posts: 2,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
^I can see Salt Lake City giving Denver a run for it's money. Also, Boise seems poised for some high growth decades ahead of it. They both offer the western lifestyle, but at a fraction of the cost of places like Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Boise seems poised, but it’s also a very conservative state. I hear people in community development/planning having a really hard time getting things done there.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #68  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2017, 8:31 PM
Cottonwood Cottonwood is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Boise
Posts: 4,013
Quote:
Originally Posted by subterranean View Post
Boise seems poised, but it’s also a very conservative state. I hear people in community development/planning having a really hard time getting things done there.
Boise is booming, construction is everywhere and the city is not really all that conservative. The current big dilemma in the Boise area is handling the growth but some of the smaller outlying suburbs are resistant to the growth which they will have to give into at some point. Prized farm land out in the rural areas is being consumed with homes and commercial developments in order to handle the growth of people moving here from Washington, Oregon, and California.

Page 12 of this link shows where most of the in-migration is coming from.

http://www.bvep.org/images/content/d...-General-1.pdf

Last edited by Cottonwood; Dec 21, 2017 at 8:42 PM. Reason: added a link
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #69  
Old Posted Feb 12, 2018, 11:40 PM
CherryCreek's Avatar
CherryCreek CherryCreek is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Denver
Posts: 575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt View Post
^I can see Salt Lake City giving Denver a run for it's money. Also, Boise seems poised for some high growth decades ahead of it. They both offer the western lifestyle, but at a fraction of the cost of places like Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Anything is possible, but for this current decade the Denver CSA has widened the gap on the Salt Lake CSA.

The 2016 CSA estimate for Salt Lake is 2.514 million, which is 10.4% growth since 2010.

The 2016 Denver CSA estimate is 3.46 million, which is 12.3% growth since 2010.

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...xhtml?src=bkmk

Here's all 1 million + CSA ranked by percentage growth - 2010 to 2016:


Percentage Growth – 2010-16

1 Cape Coral-Fort Myers-Naples, FL CSA 15.7
2 Houston-The Woodlands, TX CSA 14.0
3 Orlando-Deltona-Daytona Beach, FL CSA 13.7
4 Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC CSA 12.7
5 Denver-Aurora, CO CSA 12.3
6 Dallas-Fort Worth, TX-OK CSA 12.0
7 Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro, TN CSA 11.1
8 Charlotte-Concord, NC-SC CSA 10.8
9 Salt Lake City-Provo-Orem, UT CSA 10.7
10 Seattle-Tacoma, WA CSA 9.6
11 Las Vegas-Henderson, NV-AZ CSA 9.5
12 Oklahoma City-Shawnee, OK CSA 9.3
13 Atlanta--Athens-Clarke County--Sandy Springs, GA CSA 9.2
14 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Port St. Lucie, FL CSA 9.0
15 Jacksonville-St. Marys-Palatka, FL-GA CSA 9.0
16 Portland-Vancouver-Salem, OR-WA CSA 8.2
17 San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA CSA 7.3
18 Washington-Baltimore-Arlington, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA CSA 6.8
19 Sacramento-Roseville, CA CSA 6.3
20 New Orleans-Metairie-Hammond, LA-MS CSA 6.2
21 Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson, SC CSA 5.9
22 Columbus-Marion-Zanesville, OH CSA 5.8
23 Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI CSA 5.7
24 Indianapolis-Carmel-Muncie, IN CSA 5.3
25 Fresno-Madera, CA CSA 4.9
26 Grand Rapids-Wyoming-Muskegon, MI CSA 4.7
27 Tulsa-Muskogee-Bartlesville, OK CSA 4.6
28 Los Angeles-Long Beach, CA CSA 4.5
29 Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City, MO-KS CSA 4.4
30 El Paso-Las Cruces, TX-NM CSA 4.2
31 Knoxville-Morristown-Sevierville, TN CSA 3.8
32 Greensboro--Winston-Salem--High Point, NC CSA 3.8
33 Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT CSA 3.6
34 Louisville/Jefferson County--Madison, KY-IN CSA 3.5
35 Tucson-Nogales, AZ CSA 3.4
36 Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA-NC CSA 2.9
37 New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA CSA 2.7
38 Harrisburg-York-Lebanon, PA CSA 2.7
39 Cincinnati-Wilmington-Maysville, OH-KY-IN CSA 2.3
40 Albuquerque-Santa Fe-Las Vegas, NM CSA 2.3
41 Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD CSA 1.6
42 Birmingham-Hoover-Talladega, AL CSA 1.3
43 Memphis-Forrest City, TN-MS-AR CSA 1.2
44 Milwaukee-Racine-Waukesha, WI CSA 0.9
45 St. Louis-St. Charles-Farmington, MO-IL CSA 0.7
46 Chicago-Naperville, IL-IN-WI CSA 0.4
48 Albany-Schenectady, NY CSA 0.3
49 Detroit-Warren-Ann Arbor, MI CSA 0.0
50 Rochester-Batavia-Seneca Falls, NY CSA -0.2
51 Dayton-Springfield-Sidney, OH CSA -0.5
52 Buffalo-Cheektowaga, NY CSA -0.5
53 Hartford-West Hartford, CT CSA -0.7
54 Cleveland-Akron-Canton, OH CSA -0.9
55 Pittsburgh-New Castle-Weirton, PA-OH-WV CSA -1.0

Last edited by CherryCreek; Feb 13, 2018 at 12:29 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #70  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2018, 5:32 PM
Obadno Obadno is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,830
Quote:
Originally Posted by CherryCreek View Post
Anything is possible, but for this current decade the Denver CSA has widened the gap on the Salt Lake CSA.

The 2016 CSA estimate for Salt Lake is 2.514 million, which is 10.4% growth since 2010.

The 2016 Denver CSA estimate is 3.46 million, which is 12.3% growth since 2010.

https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...xhtml?src=bkmk

Here's all 1 million + CSA ranked by percentage growth - 2010 to 2016:


Percentage Growth – 2010-16

1 Cape Coral-Fort Myers-Naples, FL CSA 15.7
2 Houston-The Woodlands, TX CSA 14.0
3 Orlando-Deltona-Daytona Beach, FL CSA 13.7
4 Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC CSA 12.7
5 Denver-Aurora, CO CSA 12.3
6 Dallas-Fort Worth, TX-OK CSA 12.0
7 Nashville-Davidson--Murfreesboro, TN CSA 11.1
8 Charlotte-Concord, NC-SC CSA 10.8
9 Salt Lake City-Provo-Orem, UT CSA 10.7
10 Seattle-Tacoma, WA CSA 9.6
11 Las Vegas-Henderson, NV-AZ CSA 9.5
12 Oklahoma City-Shawnee, OK CSA 9.3
13 Atlanta--Athens-Clarke County--Sandy Springs, GA CSA 9.2
14 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Port St. Lucie, FL CSA 9.0
15 Jacksonville-St. Marys-Palatka, FL-GA CSA 9.0
16 Portland-Vancouver-Salem, OR-WA CSA 8.2
17 San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA CSA 7.3
18 Washington-Baltimore-Arlington, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA CSA 6.8
19 Sacramento-Roseville, CA CSA 6.3
20 New Orleans-Metairie-Hammond, LA-MS CSA 6.2
21 Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson, SC CSA 5.9
22 Columbus-Marion-Zanesville, OH CSA 5.8
23 Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI CSA 5.7
24 Indianapolis-Carmel-Muncie, IN CSA 5.3
25 Fresno-Madera, CA CSA 4.9
26 Grand Rapids-Wyoming-Muskegon, MI CSA 4.7
27 Tulsa-Muskogee-Bartlesville, OK CSA 4.6
28 Los Angeles-Long Beach, CA CSA 4.5
29 Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City, MO-KS CSA 4.4
30 El Paso-Las Cruces, TX-NM CSA 4.2
31 Knoxville-Morristown-Sevierville, TN CSA 3.8
32 Greensboro--Winston-Salem--High Point, NC CSA 3.8
33 Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT CSA 3.6
34 Louisville/Jefferson County--Madison, KY-IN CSA 3.5
35 Tucson-Nogales, AZ CSA 3.4
36 Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA-NC CSA 2.9
37 New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA CSA 2.7
38 Harrisburg-York-Lebanon, PA CSA 2.7
39 Cincinnati-Wilmington-Maysville, OH-KY-IN CSA 2.3
40 Albuquerque-Santa Fe-Las Vegas, NM CSA 2.3
41 Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD CSA 1.6
42 Birmingham-Hoover-Talladega, AL CSA 1.3
43 Memphis-Forrest City, TN-MS-AR CSA 1.2
44 Milwaukee-Racine-Waukesha, WI CSA 0.9
45 St. Louis-St. Charles-Farmington, MO-IL CSA 0.7
46 Chicago-Naperville, IL-IN-WI CSA 0.4
48 Albany-Schenectady, NY CSA 0.3
49 Detroit-Warren-Ann Arbor, MI CSA 0.0
50 Rochester-Batavia-Seneca Falls, NY CSA -0.2
51 Dayton-Springfield-Sidney, OH CSA -0.5
52 Buffalo-Cheektowaga, NY CSA -0.5
53 Hartford-West Hartford, CT CSA -0.7
54 Cleveland-Akron-Canton, OH CSA -0.9
55 Pittsburgh-New Castle-Weirton, PA-OH-WV CSA -1.0
Phoenix and Tucson are too far apart to have a CSA
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #71  
Old Posted Mar 1, 2018, 6:10 PM
subterranean's Avatar
subterranean subterranean is offline
homesick alien
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Portland
Posts: 2,396
Grand Rapids is an oft-overlooked bright spot in the Midwest. If I ever move back to MI, it would probably be there. Great beer and music scene, close to the lake, big beautiful historic homes, and still relatively affordable.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:52 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.