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  #861  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2017, 7:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Jim in Chicago View Post
Also a bunch of new housing going up very close by. Assuming there will be an entrance on the Harrison side this is literally a 5 minute walk from RiverLine.
Yes, I also expect the Post Office and Riverline should jumpstart the relatively barren area between Harrison and Roosevelt from the river to west to I-90.

If I'm not mistaken that area might be under a PMD, which seems a good candidate for rezoning at this point?
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  #862  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2017, 7:41 PM
Khantilever Khantilever is online now
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Originally Posted by intrepidDesign View Post
Time and time again I see this. Getting corporations to relocate from the suburbs is like robbing Peter to pay Paul. Chicago and Illinois should be focusing on acquiring new corporate HQ's from overseas, or at the very least, out of state. Hollowed out suburbs will just spell trouble for the city, time to start thinking a little differently about city/suburb dynamics, I don't see the two being mutually exclusive.
Firms are more productive in cities, so unless they're moving just for tax incentives the overall benefits almost certainly exceed the loss to the burbs. (The fact that many firms were originally lured or kept in the burbs by tax incentives only strengthens this point)

And there are already many mechanisms at the federal, state and county level that re-distribute the pie so that everyone can be better off after corporate relocations. To the extent that these are inadequate, we can come up with more revenue sharing arrangements.
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  #863  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2017, 7:48 PM
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Originally Posted by killaviews View Post
A suburb relocation is just a more realistic scenario. A large company relocating from far away would risk losing tons of employees in the process. And while the state may not gain directly from these relocations, the city and County could. You could even count less traffic and less pollution as a benefit.
I never said anything about how realistic it is. An international HQ would probably hire mostly local/regional staff anyway. That's the thing, NEW headquarters from international companies usually create jobs, not merely shift them from one place at the expense of another. For instance (while not a corporate headquarters) The Foxxcon plant in (potentially) Wisconsin, they are not laying off X amount of employees in China, they are going to hire Wisconsinites, Illinoisans, etc. NEW JOBS, not shifted jobs. My point was stripping the suburbs is an extremely short sighted strategy. Also to have any meaningful impact on traffic and pollution would take like 20 post offices full of relocations.
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  #864  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2017, 4:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Jim in Chicago View Post
Well, call me impressed. My initial thought was that the sides needed a thicker upright, but then realized that they match the existing windows. Then I realized how closely they match overall, same number of panes in the same configuration, even the exact same panels to match the operable portions of the existing windows. I wonder if they actually open of it it's just for show, but in any case "solid work all around".
These may be refurbishments rather than totally new windows.

http://re-view.biz/steel-windows.php

Industrial sash windows are terrible from a thermal standpoint - and guaranteed to fail Chicago Energy Code, which is why loft conversions rarely keep them. However, the single glass panes can be replaced with small double-pane IGUs. The frames can be sandblasted and repainted with an epoxy or other product.

If Post Office team was going with a replacement plan instead of refurbishment, I doubt you'd see those thicker mullions around the operable ventilators, or operable ventilators at all... it would just be three big fixed windows mulled together, with simulated divided lite. This would give you 95% of the historic appearance, for 50% of the cost of a true steel replacement.
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  #865  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2017, 3:04 PM
OrdoSeclorum OrdoSeclorum is offline
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Originally Posted by intrepidDesign View Post
Time and time again I see this. Getting corporations to relocate from the suburbs is like robbing Peter to pay Paul.
It's "robbing Peter to pay Paul" if you think about Peter and Paul as basically the same. If I like Paul way better and don't care much for Peter, and say, for example, he stole money from Paul in the past, I'm happier with Paul having the money.

I care a lot about the health of the metro region. I'm excited when a large HQ moves to or expands in the suburbs, like Caterpillar, Takeda or Zurich. I'm more excited when a large operation moves downtown from anywhere. That's where most businesses belong and it was temporary market distortions and externalities that led them to decamp to highway-served greenfields in the first place.

Chicago's metro is better served if infrastructure and services can be concentrated in a hub. It's easier to get employees to one central place than it is to get them to numerous sprawling sites. Having a concentration of business downtown allows us to leverage our existing assets without having to dilute or reproduce them multiple times. I prefer dense, walkable, transit oriented environments and having a tax base and employment downtown makes it easier to serve that and build more of it. For all those reasons, I'd be super jazzed if Walgreens or someone like that left a highway-offramp campus behind to rot and moved to the city, despite not being especially interested in seeing rot develop anywhere.
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  #866  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2017, 6:13 PM
Jim in Chicago Jim in Chicago is offline
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
These may be refurbishments rather than totally new windows.

http://re-view.biz/steel-windows.php

Industrial sash windows are terrible from a thermal standpoint - and guaranteed to fail Chicago Energy Code, which is why loft conversions rarely keep them. However, the single glass panes can be replaced with small double-pane IGUs. The frames can be sandblasted and repainted with an epoxy or other product.

If Post Office team was going with a replacement plan instead of refurbishment, I doubt you'd see those thicker mullions around the operable ventilators, or operable ventilators at all... it would just be three big fixed windows mulled together, with simulated divided lite. This would give you 95% of the historic appearance, for 50% of the cost of a true steel replacement.
I'm even more thrilled at the possibility that they're the original windows, refurbished, and beautifully from the pics. I did observe some early investigation into the metal work on the South facade, so this may indeed be the case.
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  #867  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2017, 6:22 PM
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anyone know if they plan on making a connection to the Clinton blue line stop?
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  #868  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2017, 6:53 PM
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anyone know if they plan on making a connection to the Clinton blue line stop?
That would be a brilliant move if they did. Works for the Merchandise Mart.
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  #869  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2017, 7:48 PM
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anyone know if they are accidentally knocking down the Holiday Inn to the west?
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  #870  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2017, 3:20 AM
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Originally Posted by tjp View Post
anyone know if they plan on making a connection to the Clinton blue line stop?
In the PD document there's a mention that part of the connection would be built, but the CTA would be responsible for actually connecting it to the existing station. Who knows why they didn't get them to pledge to build the whole thing.
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  #871  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2017, 1:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
If Post Office team was going with a replacement plan instead of refurbishment, I doubt you'd see those thicker mullions around the operable ventilators, or operable ventilators at all... it would just be three big fixed windows mulled together, with simulated divided lite. This would give you 95% of the historic appearance, for 50% of the cost of a true steel replacement.
I have actually seen aluminum replacement windows replicate the thicker muntins for the operable sashes before, so it is possible. From this far away it's hard to tell exactly what they did. With the protective covenants placed on the building they were probably held to maintaining the historic window appearance whether they were replaced or restored.
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  #872  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2017, 1:44 PM
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The developers of this bad boy must be going mad aggressive in their marketing efforts, because this is a lot of space. My guess is that they will get another suburban HQ in here.

But I would love if they got a company to move here from outside of Chicagoland
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  #873  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2017, 1:56 PM
BuildThemTaller BuildThemTaller is offline
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Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
The developers of this bad boy must be going mad aggressive in their marketing efforts, because this is a lot of space. My guess is that they will get another suburban HQ in here.

But I would love if they got a company to move here from outside of Chicagoland
Or even better, for a young, local company to "graduate" into this space. The overwhelming majority of new hires in this economy are from local companies. The site selection enterprise gets a lot of press relative to their contribution to the local economy. For every McDonald's relocation, there's far more Groupons and Coyote Logistics that don't get nearly the attention they deserve. I think another business incubator, perhaps focused on transportation or construction would be a great addition to the space to help supply a steady stream of potential new office occupants in the Post Office.
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  #874  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2017, 2:08 PM
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Saw that another renovation permit was recently issued. This time for the outlying "compressor building." So is that the old building that powered the compressed air mail tubes?
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  #875  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2017, 5:48 PM
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Originally Posted by BuildThemTaller View Post
Or even better, for a young, local company to "graduate" into this space. The overwhelming majority of new hires in this economy are from local companies. The site selection enterprise gets a lot of press relative to their contribution to the local economy. For every McDonald's relocation, there's far more Groupons and Coyote Logistics that don't get nearly the attention they deserve. I think another business incubator, perhaps focused on transportation or construction would be a great addition to the space to help supply a steady stream of potential new office occupants in the Post Office.
^THIS! All of the suburbs vs city argument is a waste of energy. The real companies we should be focused on are Outcome Health, Uptake, SpotHero, GrubHub, SMS Assist, and their ilk. These companies represents employment that adds to the metro instead of just shuffling from suburbs to city. That being said, I think you are likely to get more startup activity in the city compared to the suburbs.
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  #876  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2017, 8:04 PM
LouisVanDerWright LouisVanDerWright is online now
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Guys this is not a zero sum game. 1 job in the suburbs does not have the same value to metro Chicago as 1 job in the city. Period.

This is not how cities work, cities exist because they become more and more efficient the more dense they become. That is because you have more users sharing the costs of infrastructure and creating unique opportunities for exchange. You will not have the same growth as a company if you wallow out in the suburbs where your employees will likely never interact on any given day with someone from outside of the company. That is bad for the company. Interactions with many different people with different ideas, ways of doing things, opinions, etc is what drives innovation and creativity. It's why the first trading posts sprung up and then grew into Hamlet's, then towns then cities. It's literally the story of civilization and suburbanization runs totally contrary to it.


Additionally these employees, by cloistering inside of a corporate campus, never interact with other businesses and do not provide the economic multiplier effect that brings. So not only do corporations not benefit from being in the burbs, but the businesses around them do not benefit as much because the great distances do not lend themselves to trade. That's why suburbs have malls and cities have a fabric of retail streets.

Finally the employees themselves do not benefit. Think of the great variety of options living in a city brings. Literally anything you want is at your fingertips. Want a gastro pub boom, it's there, want a brewery boom it's there, have an extremely obscure hobby, boom there's a Warhammer 3000 shop just for you. The most interesting thing about this is that it all starts the cycle anew. The great variety of options available to urban consumers makes them more creative, it let's them pursue anything they want and to drill down to the deepest level of their interests. This further Stokes their creativity and that feeds right back into their work life further benefiting their employers who in turn grow and attract yet more residents. Before you know it you have great business districts like the Chicago Loop.

And guess what? All suburbs are an unnatural outgrowth of that business district that feed off the dynanism of that agglomeration. Reconsolidating these employers and employees is reinvigorating our economy and is a self perpetuating process that cannot be stopped at this point. These are not 1 for 1 gains for the city and losses for the suburbs. Every job that comes downtown makes Chicago metro healthier and has a multiplier effect on literally every aspect of our economy that simply does not occur in the burbs. Economists have studied this. Take a course in urban economics. This is not some rant or bizzare theory I made up. It is accepted, tested, fact.
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  #877  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2017, 9:31 PM
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I don't see corporations clammoring to give 50% raises to their employees so that they can relocate. I have a family and I can't afford to move into the city. And I'm not squishing into a two bedroom.

I'll take the train first. Bedroom suburbs around the Metra stations aren't going away.
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  #878  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2017, 10:40 PM
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Only the most googly googly idealists among us (hanging out with other singles drinking fancy cocktails and pretending the world outside of the city doesn't exist--a fun world but not real) actually think bedroom suburbs will go away for good.

But a HQ relocation to the city makes sense for many corporations. Metra and the highways ensure that suburbanites will still get to a downtown job.
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  #879  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2017, 6:02 PM
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  #880  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2017, 6:12 PM
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^Hooooly shit. That's gorgeous. Definitely did not expect them to be at this stage in the lobby so quickly.
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