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  #11141  
Old Posted May 11, 2018, 9:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kora View Post
Immigration to Canada, by country of citizenship, 2017

India back on top, overtaking Philippines. Nigeria and Iraq are new entrants in the top 10.

India: 51,650
Philippines: 40,855
China: 30,280
Syria: 12,045
USA: 9,100
Pakistan: 7,655
France: 6,600
Nigeria: 5,460
UK: 5,295
Iraq: 4,740

Government of Canada
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration...open-data.html
The open data link says 2015 numbers, is there a direct link to the 2017 figures presented here?
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  #11142  
Old Posted May 12, 2018, 12:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mistercorporate View Post
The open data link says 2015 numbers, is there a direct link to the 2017 figures presented here?
It's under:
Monthly updates
Permanent Residents – Monthly IRCC Updates
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  #11143  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2018, 4:07 PM
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Exports up, imports down in April. Trade surplus with USA rises from $2B to $3.6B (largely on oil sales and lower auto imports) - perhaps not ideal timing for that...

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail...-eng.htm?HPA=1
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  #11144  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2018, 11:02 PM
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  #11145  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 12:58 PM
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Canada's population estimates, first quarter 2018

Released: 2018-06-14

Select geography

Quarterly population estimate — Canada

37,067,011


April 1, 2018

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Source(s): Table 17-10-0009-01.

Canada's population passes the 37-million mark

According to preliminary estimates, Canada's population was 37,067,011 on April 1, 2018. It took two years and two months for the Canadian population to go from 36 million to more than 37 million. This was the shortest length of time ever observed for an increase of this magnitude. In the first quarter, Canada's population growth rate was 0.3%, up 103,157 compared with January 1, 2018.

International migration is the main source of population growth

From January 1 to April 1, 2018, international migratory increase was 88,120, the highest level ever for a first quarter. Canada received 79,951 immigrants, while the number of non-permanent residents rose by 22,283. The increase in the number of non-permanent residents was attributable to an increase in the number of work permit holders and refugee claimants.

Natural increase in the first quarter was 15,037, or the difference between 93,944 births and 78,907 deaths. Natural increase reached historic lows according to preliminary data, primarily because Canada had never recorded so many deaths in a single quarter. In addition, there are generally fewer births during this time of the year.

Population grows everywhere except in Newfoundland and Labrador

The population grew in every province and territory in the first quarter, with the exception of Newfoundland and Labrador (-0.3%). Nunavut (+0.7%), Ontario and Alberta (+0.4% each) had higher population growth rates than Canada's (+0.3%). Alberta returned to the positive side in its migratory exchanges with other provinces and territories in the last three quarters, following two consecutive years of losses. The province had interprovincial migration gains of 1,862 in the first three months of the year.
https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail...098-1&indgeo=0



https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1...pid=1710000901
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  #11146  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:14 PM
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Are there any projections re what Newfoundland's population is expected to fall to over time?
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  #11147  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:15 PM
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Strong growth everywhere (except in Nfld), and Canada has already hit 37M? I feel like we hit 35M only recently.

Last edited by le calmar; Jun 14, 2018 at 1:43 PM.
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  #11148  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:22 PM
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Our own government predicts we will drop to 506,000 by 2036 in the most likely scenario.

If things go better than expected, 523,500. If things go worse, 492,000.

For St. John's specifically, the most likely scenario is 235,000 by 2036.

If things go better than expected, 242,500. If things go worse than expected, 228,000.

Our predictions for ourselves are consistently more accurate than Stats Can so I think it's safe to expect this range to prove accurate.

None of this is the end of our people. To keep things in perspective, Iceland has 335,000 people, with 122,000 of them in Reykjavik (216,000 in the Capital City Region, basically identical to St. John's).
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  #11149  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Strong growth everywhere (except in Nfld), and Canada already hit 37M? I feel like we hit 35M only recently.
Me too. We're moving in on 40M way faster than I thought we were.
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  #11150  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 1:36 PM
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"Now we are twenty million"

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  #11151  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:02 PM
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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
Strong growth everywhere (except in Nfld), and Canada has already hit 37M? I feel like we hit 35M only recently.
As I was just saying on the Atlantic Canada Stats thread, the population of Canada 'stuck' for me at 30M when I was in high school in the 90's.

Google has a nice chart showing the growth through the years.

1966: 20M
1982: 25M (16 years)
1997: 30M (15 years)
2012: 35M (15 years)
2018: 37M
est: 40M by 2025 (or sooner more likely)

By that graph our growth has been pretty stable at 5M/15 years, but we're clearly starting to take off in recent years. We wouldn't be due for 40M until 2027, but we should be there by 2023-2024 most likely.
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  #11152  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:13 PM
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Given current growth, there could be 2,000,000 Maritimers in 10 years time.

Newfoundlanders though need to pick up the pace..........
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  #11153  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:27 PM
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Originally Posted by SignalHillHiker View Post
None of this is the end of our people. To keep things in perspective, Iceland has 335,000 people, with 122,000 of them in Reykjavik (216,000 in the Capital City Region, basically identical to St. John's).
Iceland gets about five times the number of tourists annually, though.

I was just in Reykjavik, actually. It feels bigger than St. John's but that's probably because apartment blocks are more common there than they are in North America. Home ownership with a separate house and yard is simply entirely less common. Makes the city feel more built up than it actually is, and condenses distances nicely.
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  #11154  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 2:30 PM
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Oh Europe always feels bigger. You certainly don't need to go to 122K to find something that feels bigger than St. John's. Waterford Ireland has 53K and feels every bit as big.
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  #11155  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 3:03 PM
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The worst six month stretch for Saskatchewan in 12 years. Bad news with only minimal optimism in the near future.
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  #11156  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 4:04 PM
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^^Manitoba had the same slow recent Q2 stretch with only 1,800 people increase as compared to Saskatchewan's 1,500. It probably is traditionally the slowest quarter of the year.


Interesting, at this rate with PEI gaining 3,000/ year & Newfoundland losing 3,000/ year, Newfoundland could drop to smallest province in Canada in...oh, say 60 years.

I was in Iceland in April and to me it seemed like a thriving little country, very self sufficient, probably because it's had centuries to refine it's game, acting like a country.

I've never been to Newfoundland so I can't say why it's not the same. Maybe because Canada has fostered Newfoundland's reliance to the nation as a whole, with equalization payments over the years & not helping the province manage it's cod fishing industry etc.

As far as urbanization/big city feel goes I think it just has to do with the urban trappings that give me the big city feel in places I've been. Whistler village in BC probably has the most congested, tight knit urban feel of most any town I've been in Canada, with probably the highest sq foot/population of restaurants, convention space, bars & clubs anywhere in the country but I don't think it has a big city feel, which is my same impression of Reykjavik, I imagine St. John is the same. Spread out city suburbs like Scottsdale or Anaheim make me think big city way more than any small fishing port ever could.
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  #11157  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 4:09 PM
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I didn't know that Manitoba/Saskatchewan and Alberta/B.C we so close in populations.
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  #11158  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 4:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SaskScraper View Post
^^Manitoba had the same slow recent Q2 stretch with only 1,800 people increase as compared to Saskatchewan's 1,500. It probably is traditionally the slowest quarter of the year.


Interesting, at this rate with PEI gaining 3,000/ year & Newfoundland losing 3,000/ year, Newfoundland could drop to smallest province in Canada in...oh, say 60 years.

I was in Iceland in April and to me it seemed like a thriving little country, very self sufficient, probably because it's had centuries to refine it's game, acting like a country.

I've never been to Newfoundland so I can't say why it's not the same. Maybe because Canada has fostered Newfoundland's reliance to the nation as a whole, with equalization payments over the years & not helping the province manage it's cod fishing industry etc.

As far as urbanization/big city feel goes I think it just has to do with the urban trappings that give me the big city feel in places I've been. Whistler village in BC probably has the most congested, tight knit urban feel of most any town I've been in Canada, with probably the highest sq foot/population of restaurants, convention space, bars & clubs anywhere in the country but I don't think it has a big city feel, which is my same impression of Reykjavik, I imagine St. John is the same. Spread out city suburbs like Scottsdale or Anaheim make me think big city way more than any small fishing port ever could.
It's a mixed bag as far as St. John's is concerned. I certainly don't get a big city feeling in places like Mount Pearl or Mississauga or Scottsdale, but that aside your assessment is mostly right.

St. John's kind of has a bit of everything. It has quaint sanitized tourist areas and artsy lively local neighborhoods. It has hideous and littered industrial areas and gossipy insular working class neighborhoods. Music and art permeate everything, and in the core it's still a walkable city with things like superettes and pubs and barber shops on every other block. Then it has the suburbs that emphasize the very worst of North American urban planning with none of the aesthetic value.

Overall I would say it feels like a European city of 50K, with the added gravitas of being an isolated, self sufficient capital. And it feels like a North American city of up to about 500K. It's livelier and grittier. But if you're coming from a city the size of Winnipeg and up, it's going to feel very small. Coming from North American cities smaller than that, you really shouldn't feel underwhelmed or that you're in a comparably more provincial town.
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  #11159  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 6:28 PM
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Originally Posted by TorontoDrew View Post
I didn't know that Manitoba/Saskatchewan and Alberta/B.C we so close in populations.
Actually, Saskatchewan would have more people than Manitoba had it not stagnated for so long. It was supposed to boom in the 80's thanks to potash but for whatever reason, that never panned out. It only really started growing again over the past decade or so.

On the other hand, Manitoba was stagnant for years and picked up only fairly recently as well. It's somewhat interesting that both of those provinces were stagnant for so long and suddenly that all changed around the turn of the millennium.
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  #11160  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2018, 7:45 PM
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There's really no hope for Newfoundland. There's a hole in our demographics where all the young folks starting families should be. And there's a blister that's the 65+ demographic that's beginning to pop.

Little to no diversification in our economy, even in St. John's, will be our downfall. It's all and well to try and get people to stay here or come from away to learn at MUN, but when there are no jobs in any of those fields what are you left to do? We've been suffering a huge brain drain for decades, and it has no signs of stopping.
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