HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #121  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 3:16 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 13,001
GM is shutting the Oshawa plant for two weeks, apparently due to shortages of auto parts attributed to the recent earthquake in Japan. Interestingly, neither Honda nor Toyota has indicated that they are having parts supply problems (yet). Oddities of global supply chains.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #122  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 3:44 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 16,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stryker View Post
I'm quoting this, wondering if anyone has looked at the nalcor numbers, on tab 2.


Seems like these people are dramatically over payed but I have no idea what to compare it to.

Considering they are an ineffective crown corporation(whatever it is) in utilities it seems like these numbers are hugely over inflated.(i.e. fort macmurray numbers)

Martin, Edmund J. Nalcor Energy President & CEO $685,600.00
Sturge, Derrick Nalcor Energy Vice-President Finance & Chief Financial Officer$351,100.00
MacIsaac, John Nalcor Energy President, Newfoundland Hydro $335,000.00
Bennett, Gilbert J. Nalcor Energy Vice-President Lower Churchill $334,100.00
Day, Reginald M. Nalcor Energy Electrical/Mechanical Supervisor $333,000.00
Keating, Jim Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Oil & Gas $318,500.00
Kieley, Chris Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Strategic Planning & Business Development$295,900.00
McDonald, Gerard Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Human Resources & Organizational Effectiveness$272,700.00
Henderson, Robert J. Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Transition to Operations$267,500.00


It aactually gets far more alarming when you get to employee #100 who still makes something like 150 grand a year.
I'm assuming they're all in the $900-a-year levy bracket
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #123  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 3:47 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 16,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
It seems to defeat any advantage to be found in the Westminster Model - sacrificed at the altar of () populism. Me no like, but I don't have to live there!
I would tend to look at it the other way -- if I were a PM, I would hope that my budget is reasonable enough that I don't have to coerce my MPs into voting for it. Should be a free vote and still pass, otherwise there's a problem, and it's a problem with the budget, not with the retive MPs.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #124  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 7:32 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 13,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
I would tend to look at it the other way -- if I were a PM, I would hope that my budget is reasonable enough that I don't have to coerce my MPs into voting for it. Should be a free vote and still pass, otherwise there's a problem, and it's a problem with the budget, not with the retive MPs.
One assumes that caucus would have a fair inkling of the contents of a coming budget. Withdrawing support after it has been tabled is populist grandstanding, imho. It also seems terribly self-serving - helping to defeat your own government while trying to save your seat if/when the government falls. Why not just act on principle and resign, if it's that big an issue?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #125  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 11:18 PM
Loco101's Avatar
Loco101 Loco101 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Timmins, Northern Ontario
Posts: 1,984
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stryker View Post
I'm quoting this, wondering if anyone has looked at the nalcor numbers, on tab 2.


Seems like these people are dramatically over payed but I have no idea what to compare it to.

Considering they are an ineffective crown corporation(whatever it is) in utilities it seems like these numbers are hugely over inflated.(i.e. fort macmurray numbers)

Martin, Edmund J. Nalcor Energy President & CEO $685,600.00
Sturge, Derrick Nalcor Energy Vice-President Finance & Chief Financial Officer$351,100.00
MacIsaac, John Nalcor Energy President, Newfoundland Hydro $335,000.00
Bennett, Gilbert J. Nalcor Energy Vice-President Lower Churchill $334,100.00
Day, Reginald M. Nalcor Energy Electrical/Mechanical Supervisor $333,000.00
Keating, Jim Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Oil & Gas $318,500.00
Kieley, Chris Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Strategic Planning & Business Development$295,900.00
McDonald, Gerard Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Human Resources & Organizational Effectiveness$272,700.00
Henderson, Robert J. Nalcor Energy Vice-President, Transition to Operations$267,500.00


It aactually gets far more alarming when you get to employee #100 who still makes something like 150 grand a year.

The people above are paid peanuts compared to those at Hydro One and OPG (Ontario Power Generation). But for NL's population I would say that it's not easy to digest.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #126  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2016, 11:31 PM
Marty_Mcfly's Avatar
Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 3,106
I have no issue with people who work hard their entire lives, and elevate themselves into VP and CFO roles and get paid well. My issue would be more along the lines if administrative assistants are making 100k.

That being said, I never looked at our sunshine list. I know it was made with ill intentions.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #127  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 11:16 AM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,595
The media finally found someone to take a slightly more positive tone. I agree with this nurse as well, but it's nice to have someone trying to take a positive spin.

Budget 'tipping point' for young nurse's decision to leave N.L.

Quote:
A young nurse who came to Newfoundland and Labrador five years ago for a cheaper education and fell in love with the province has decided to leave, and is blaming tax measures in last week's budget.

Taylor Kerr said she's one of many young professionals feeling alienated by the budget, and said there isn't much of a future for her generation.

"It almost feels like the government doesn't see us as an asset," Kerr told CBC News Tuesday.

Reasons to be optimistic

But a public policy and regional development specialist at Memorial University's Harris Centre doesn't believe this is the beginning of an exodus from the province.

Rob Greenwood said a lot of people are hurting as the economy falters and job losses mount, but he sees plenty of reasons to be optimistic.

Greenwood said the province is coming off the most prosperous decade in its history. The population is more skilled, experienced and worldly than ever before, he said, and is ripe for an explosion of entrepreneurship.

"Anyone who's sizing up the merits of moving versus staying and have skills and expertise and knowledge in particular sectors ... I think we're going to have a real opportunity — and track the stats, I guarantee ya — you're going to see more business creation over the next four to five years."

Greenwood predicts a flood of job opportunities as the baby boomer generation retires in large numbers.

With Alberta's economy also sagging, he said the only real pull is from southern Ontario and some parts of British Columbia. But "off the charts" housing prices make those regions less attractive.

"I don't think there's going to be a massive outmigration, at least in the short to medium term," said Greenwood, "because of that lack of pull to go with the push."

Job opportunities greater in Nova Scotia

But the pull is strong enough for Kerr and her partner, who are returning to their home province of Nova Scotia in the fall.

They both graduated a year ago from Memorial University, and were strongly considering putting down roots in Newfoundland and Labrador.

They talked about buying a house and starting a family, and were enjoying the network of friends they had established.

But Kerr's chances of getting a full-time job as a community health nurse are slim, and she said the increased cost of living in the Liberal government's budget raised many questions.

"Can we afford a vehicle? Can we afford insurance on that vehicle? Can we afford to buy a home now? Have kids? All that kind of stuff," Kerr said.

"It's almost like they're not welcoming us into the province.They're almost saying 'we're going to tax you on almost everything you can possibly do here.'"

Greenwood acknowledged there is a "painful adjustment" ahead as the province moves past a period of "irrational exuberance" driven by record oil production and royalties and government spending, but doesn't buy into the doom and gloom predictions.

"I think when you compare the push and the pull factors, there's a lot of reason to stay," he said.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfou...land-1.3543125
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #128  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 2:24 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
I have no issue with people who work hard their entire lives, and elevate themselves into VP and CFO roles and get paid well. My issue would be more along the lines if administrative assistants are making 100k.

That being said, I never looked at our sunshine list. I know it was made with ill intentions.
Transparency in government?

I have no problems with someone working hard and making 150k a year.

But when people start making ten times the mininum wage, I fail to understand how anyone can be said to deserve such money.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #129  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 2:24 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 13,001
Not to be harsh, but how does the experience of a low-level professional moving back to Nova Scotia from Newfoundland constitute a news story? The local CBC must be hard up this week.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #130  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 2:26 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,595
Small city, I suppose. There are a lot of anecdotal stories like that. Of every possible type - hard news, human interest, positive, negative, whatever.
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #131  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 3:04 PM
Marty_Mcfly's Avatar
Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 3,106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stryker View Post
Transparency in government?

I have no problems with someone working hard and making 150k a year.

But when people start making ten times the mininum wage, I fail to understand how anyone can be said to deserve such money.
Ten times the minimum wage comes out to be around 200k before taxes. That's not an insane wage depending on what you're doing. Definitely won't be making that right out of school, or in most fields ever But if you were near the top of the corporate ladder it's a fair salary, depending on whether or not the company can afford to pay you such.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Not to be harsh, but how does the experience of a low-level professional moving back to Nova Scotia from Newfoundland constitute a news story? The local CBC must be hard up this week.
You should check out our local news daily. There's nothing to report on. Maybe some news from government as the top story, maybe an armed robbery or two, and then a few stories from smaller communities....and then that's it. We're forced to report on car accidents and personal stories about our neighbours Somehow, NTV runs a 90 minute evening news program Monday through Friday, I imagine after the initial 10 minutes there's a lot of stories about cod and basket weaving.

Oh, and probably 20 minutes dedicated to the weather. Newfoundlanders love talking about weather.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #132  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 3:11 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 13,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
Ten times the minimum wage comes out to be around 200k before taxes. That's not an insane wage depending on what you're doing. Definitely won't be making that right out of school, or in most fields ever But if you were near the top of the corporate ladder it's a fair salary, depending on whether or not the company can afford to pay you such.



You should check out our local news daily. There's nothing to report on. Maybe some news from government as the top story, maybe an armed robbery or two, and then a few stories from smaller communities....and then that's it. We're forced to report on car accidents and personal stories about our neighbours Somehow, NTV runs a 90 minute evening news program Monday through Friday, I imagine after the initial 10 minutes there's a lot of stories about cod and basket weaving.

Oh, and probably 20 minutes dedicated to the weather. Newfoundlanders love talking about weather.
Well, to be fair, our local news today includes a piece on a pair of "mystery" ospreys nesting at a lake north of here ("mystery" because they don't seem to be the birds that nested there last year). On the other hand, there's also a business report about a local motorhome manufacturer preparing for a $75million investment and up to 300 new manufacturing jobs.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #133  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 3:17 PM
Stryker Stryker is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 3,559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty_Mcfly View Post
Ten times the minimum wage comes out to be around 200k before taxes. That's not an insane wage depending on what you're doing. Definitely won't be making that right out of school, or in most fields ever But if you were near the top of the corporate ladder it's a fair salary, depending on whether or not the company can afford to pay you such.
My problem is that people that advocate such high wages have nothing but a pile of biases and nonsensical reasonings for such high wages.

There's a huge pile of evidence that suggests that this vertical management style is nothing but a bunch of pseudo scientific theory on why anyone is that useful.


Be clear I'm not saying that situation is the same when the ceo is also the owner of the company etc. Obviously being a shareholder changes things.

But this reasoning shouldn't apply to government services.


Its just absolute fraud as far as I'm concerned.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #134  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 4:20 PM
lio45 lio45 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Lévis, QC
Posts: 16,001
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwoldtimer View Post
Not to be harsh, but how does the experience of a low-level professional moving back to Nova Scotia from Newfoundland constitute a news story? The local CBC must be hard up this week.
If it's deemed a "typical" story, then yes, I have no problem seeing how it's actual news material.

For example, say there's a foreclosing crisis in Wabush after the mine closes; you can interview one (representative) family losing their home, and that's a news story.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #135  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 7:24 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,595
Economic diversification has started.

__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #136  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 8:19 PM
kwoldtimer kwoldtimer is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: La vraie capitale
Posts: 13,001
There was a report today (CBC?) about somebody building an on-line "direct from the boat to your restaurant" business in Newfoundland that seemed brilliant to me - I could see fine dining restaurants in Ontario and Quebec clamouring for such a service.

Plus the new farmers market will be a good outlet for all those local mustard pickle canners that have started up!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #137  
Old Posted Apr 23, 2016, 8:45 PM
Bcasey25raptor's Avatar
Bcasey25raptor Bcasey25raptor is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Vancouver-False Creek
Posts: 2,052
All of my friends still in Newfoundland are planning on moving to BC within 2 years.
__________________
~ Singles life in Vancouver 2017, 200sq ft micro condos, thanks mayor Moonbeam.
~ Just a girl trapped in an inner city micro studio
~ Just Watch me
- Pierre Elliot Trudeau
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #138  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 7:09 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,595
We're just far enough from Downtown that there's rarely anything advertised on our poles in Rabbittown. Not so with this.

They're everywhere.



__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #139  
Old Posted Apr 24, 2016, 9:39 PM
Marty_Mcfly's Avatar
Marty_Mcfly Marty_Mcfly is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: St. John's, NL
Posts: 3,106
Saw the first panhandler downtown today with a sign saying "need $100 for groceries, out of money because of budget cuts". Hard to tell if he's really in need or not
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #140  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2016, 3:49 PM
SignalHillHiker's Avatar
SignalHillHiker SignalHillHiker is offline
I ♣ Baby Seals
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: See post below...
Posts: 24,595
Revolt of the bologna republic


The sacking of Parliament. April 5, 1932. St. John's, NL.

Quote:
I am grateful to the Dwight Ball Liberals for their most recent budget — not for the content, on that front the new government is a bitter disappointment, so oblivious to the financial pulse — but for the public reaction the document has provoked.
There’s life in us yet.

...

We are a people easily pacified. We’ve lived most of our 500-plus years hand-to-mouth, barely eking out an existence from the land and sea, and, generally speaking, we take what little we’re given, and kiss the hand that offers it.

...

Only the ’32 riot, in which the Prime Minister of the day, Sir Richard Squires, barely made it out alive (some reports had him disguised as a woman), led to Newfoundland surrendering her democracy the very next year. We had lost faith in our ability to govern ourselves. My late Grandmother was among the 10,000-strong mob and was not impressed that the liquor stores (and not the grocery stores) were plundered.

...

Next time we have money (Please God there’s a next time), things will be different.

Our economic engine must be rebuilt to work without oil, while, at the same time, praying for at least one more prolonged boost in the price of a barrel to fund our moving-on expenses.

...

So here we stand, with Russell Wangersky, leading columnist at the province’s largest daily advising us to “get out if you can.”

He’s either given up hope (and burnt himself out), or deliberately poking the Newfoundland and Labrador bear. (Thanks for that, by the way.)

The changes that we must fight for now are not just in budget choices (which, experts warn, will lead to personal bankruptcies ), but an overthrow of the status quo.

The Finance minister accused the Opposition Tories of weaving a “tapestry of bologna” in their criticism of the budget, but the minister herself wouldn’t know a stick of bologna if the Hamburglar swung it like a baton.

The revolt has begun, the Revolt of the Bologna Republic.

Newfoundland and Labrador will never prosper until it controls its three main resources: fish, oil and gas, and hydro. Battles must be waged with respect to fisheries management; the continuation of the Upper Churchill contract and future power transmission through Quebec; as well as the ownership of offshore oil and gas reserves.

As it stands, we control none. Even the Atlantic Accord is supposed to make us the principle beneficiary of our offshore resources — and we are not.

We are not now, and have never been, masters of our own destiny. Danny Williams raised the possibility, but the follow through went nowhere.

...

Newfoundland and Labrador’s best interests too often do not align with those of the Maritimes or the rest of the country. I’ve seen that first hand.

Dwight Ball cannot represent out best interests as long as he’s in loving lock-step with Justin Trudeau. That can’t work.

Our political system does not allow MHAs or MPs to speak their minds, to stray from the official party line. As a Member of Parliament, the thing I missed most from my life before politics was freedom.

That system will be our undoing.

Unprecedented times call for unprecedented measures. The time has come for a Newfoundland and Labrador party, similar to Alberta’s Wildrose, the Saskatchewan Party, or even Quebec’s Parti Québécois.

Comparable in that the mandate of the new party must be to represent Newfoundland and Labrador’s best interests — always, and above all else.

That sort of change isn’t easy — indeed, it would take a monumental effort — but the fire begins with a spark.

And, thankfully, we have another one now.
http://fishermansroad.blogspot.ca/20...-republic.html

I'm loving where this is going.
__________________
Note to self: "The plural of anecdote is not evidence."
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > Canada
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 7:20 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.